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Publication numberUS1568959 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 12, 1926
Filing dateNov 20, 1924
Priority dateNov 20, 1924
Publication numberUS 1568959 A, US 1568959A, US-A-1568959, US1568959 A, US1568959A
InventorsChase Harold Mason, Robertson George Wilmot
Original AssigneeRiverside And Dan River Cotton
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Process of treating warp in long chain or rope form
US 1568959 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 12 1926.

H.,M. CHASE Er AL PROCESS OF TREATING WARP Ill LONG CHAIN 0R ROPE FORM Filed Nov. 20, 1924 lll i II I1 I II I Patented Jan. 12, i926. I

UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE.

HAROLD MASON CHASE AND GEORGE WILKO'I ROBERTSON, OF DAN VILLE, VIRGINIA,

ASSIGNORS TO RIVERSIDE AND DAN RIVER COTTON MILLS. OF DANVILLE, VIR- GINIA, A CORPORATION 01' VIRGINIA.

PROCESS OI TREATING WARP IN LONG CHAIN OR ROPE FORK.

Application filed November 20, 1924. Serial- No. 751,054.

To all whom it may concern:

Be it known that we, HAROLD MAsoN CHASE and Gfionon lVILMo r ROBERTSON, citizens of the United States, residing at 5 Danville, in the county of Pittsylvania and State of Virginia, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Processes of Treating Warp in Long Chain or Rope Form, of which the following is a specifica- Ition.

Our process is designed for the continuous treatment of long chain warps whereby the white war s are "by successive-and continuous steps oiled out, cooled, dipped in dye liquid, oxidized, cleaned, dried, and delivered com lete ready for the beaming machinewit out being handled manually.

The illustration is a diagram of the apparatus shown in our Patent No. 1500298 of July 8, 1924, which is adapted to carry out our process.

A long chain warp may be defined as a number of cotton or yarn threads all lying arallel and arranged in rope form consistmg of approximately four hundred threads on the average and varying in length from one to twelve thousand yards.

These lon chain warps when made are, of course, w ite and the roblem is to dye them a uniform shade an .a dyed condition forthe next ste in using the wi l with the least laboran expense.

It wi be remembered that the threads or ends are not manufactured into the form of a long chain warp except for the urpose of dyeing, bleaching or other c emical treatment; that is to say, it is entirely possible, and is used by some mills, to make white cloth by running thewhite threads directl from the spools to the beamer, and it is a so possible to make colored cloth by dyeing the cotton before it isis un. In the ever, the raw unbleached cotton is spun and formed into the long chain war 5. The problem is to dye these long cham warps with indi 0, although the process is equa y as valuab e for other vat dyes. I

Prior to our invention of this rocess, this dyein of long chain warps was andled in the f0 owing way: A long chain war was brought to a vat equipped wit squeeze rollers; which in principle was deliver them in 7 process we are consi ering, how-- the same as an ordinary clothes wringer and tub. This warp was passed through the vat containing hot water and some washing material for the purpose of cleaning or wetting the warp, thence through the squeeze rollers into a box or can. (2) It was manually taken out of this box by the end that went into the box last and passed through the cold water tank for the purpose of cooling it, and again deposited in the box speak, an independent process; that is to.

say, in each case the we was passed throu h a vat, deposited in a ox and taken out 0 that box again for the next machine by the end that went in last. This, of course, required manual handling and in a great many cases the warp was moved from one part of the mill to another as the successive machines were in separate units some distance apart.

The labor required is, of course, obvious. The result also was that frequently the warp became tangled and the threads were in- 'ured in removing them from the various oxes. As the warp was reversed upon or maintained in the same direction, thereby reducing the strength of the threads themselves, and rendering them more diflicult of handling in the beaming process.

In latter years efiorts were made to combine the successive steps of this process as much as possible, so as to prevent the loss in labor in handling the warp. This was particularly true because where a dee shade of dye was required, the warp ha to be dipped in successive vats or dipped repeatedly in the same vat, so that the warp would tfalkg up sufficient dye to give it the necessary s a e.

, It may be here stated that many years 90 each separate step, the fibers were not laid ago the warp was handled when a deep shade was required through successive vats and the ends were reversed for the reason that the end that went into the dye first took on a deeper shade than the end that went in last. Many years ago a process was worked out to supply to the same vat continuously the necessary dye stuff so that the shade of the warp would be the same from end to end. Up to the time of our Patents, 1500298 and 1500299, if it were necessary to dip the warp into the dyein vat more than once,

this was accomplishe by dipping it into the required number of successive vats.

By our process we are enabled to carry all of its steps in one machine and use only one dye vat for the number of successive dips necessary to obtain the desired shade. Our Patent No. 1500298 discloses a machine which is adapted to carry out -our process by which a war is taken, boiled out, cooled,

di ped in' vat ye liquid, oxidized, cleaned' dr ed and delivered completed at the other end ready for the beamer. This is one continuous run. The warp is fed in at one end and delivered at the other. It travels always in the same direction. The fibers of the yarn are all laid and maintained in the same direction and it is, of course, apparent that by our process we are enabled to save considerable labor.

As disclosed in our prior patents just above designated we ma if desired, use agitators in the dye liqui Of course it is obvious that the warp being treated under our process may be redipped in the dye as many times as may be found necessar to obtain the required shade, the oxi izing step following after each dipping of the warp in the dye.

If a warp is run through a succession of separate noncommunicating tanks, the shade represents the combination of the separate tanks. Bear in mind now, that in a continuous rocess the warp is not reversed and run in one end first, and then the other, but that the theory is that sufiicientdye stuff is supplied continuously to maintain the dye stuff at the required strength. It has been found that by the continuous process where the dye stuff is fed into the tanks it is very necessary that the dye stuff in the successive tanks be maintained at uniform strength to prevent variation in shade. Emphasis is laid upon the fact that in the continuous process there is no opportunity to stop and examine the shade to see whether it is in accordance with the requirement. In the continuous process using a succession of separate tanks, it has been found most difiicult to maintain liquid in the successive tanks in the same standard strength for the reason that it is impossible to tell how much dye stuff the warp took out of each par ticular tank, and if, therefore, it was fed into the tanks at a continuous rate the strength in the various tanks would vary, and although the same amount of dye stuff might have been fed into the succession of tanks during the rocess, due to the variation in the strengt in the particular tanks, the shade would not be uniform. This applies not only to the chain warp in question, if a long one, but to the successive warps, if passed through the tanks.

Therefore, the use of a sin le tank and the successive dips of the warp 1nto the same tank permits the dye stuff to remain the same strength for each successive dip.

The term single tank as herein used includes one individual tank or a succession of tanks having communication with each other whereby the same body of li uid d e may freely circulate from one tan to t e other thus insuring the same standard strength of dye in all tanks or vats.

The reference numeral 13 designates a track upon which a truck 12 is adapted to travel. Balls of long chain warps 10 are mounted on said truck. The long chain warp in the single continuous run passes through the boiling out machine or vat 11, thence between squeeze rollers 11, thence over a guide roller 11 and thence into cooling tank 14, thence between squeeze rollers 11, thence over a guide roller 11", thence into the dye vat or vats 15 passing over the first series of rollers, therein shown, taking up a certain amount of dye. It then asses between squeeze rollers 15 from whic it is conducted off over rollers 16 a distance in order to give it proper exposure to the air to oxidize the dye, it is then again dip ed into the vat dye liquid passing over rol ers 15 thence between squeeze rollers 15, from which it is conducted off over rollers 17, 18, 19, a distance to again give it proper exposure to the air, to again oxidize the dye and, continuing, the warp is conducted throu h the washing machine 20-21, thence over rier rolls 2223, thence to coilers 24 in perfect condition to be delivered to the beamer, thus the white long chain warp is treated, dyed, dried, coiled, and ready for the beamer without manual handling in one continuous process, and the fibres after being all laid in one direction are not disturbed in this relation throughout the entire process, consequently they are in the same relation when, the warp is ready for the beamer that they were when the process started. a

If preferred a series of dye vats may b used in our continuous process, but in such case they should be in free communication with each other and all of the dye stuff fed into one vat and a pump in that vat kee s the dyeing liquor circulating through tlie successive vats. This will maintain the same strength of dye in all of the rats. We

laid in one direction.-

1,ses,9so

refer, however, to use a single dye vat as it is much simpler. But irrespective of the machine, or apparatus, our invention resides in the continuous process of starting with the lon chain war white at the beginning and en ing .up with it dyed and dry at the other end after one continuous run.

In a mill using dyed long chain warps, that is warps in the long chain or rope form, these warps must be dyed, dried and delivered to the beaming department to be wound on section beams for the next operation. The operations involved in dyeing and drying are long and tedious and the more numerous they are the worse is the condition of the warpswhen delivered to the beamer. Moreover when warps are run in one direction through an apparatus the small fibres on the outside of the yarn are When the warp is reversed and run in the opposite direction these fibres are raised from their first position and laid in the other direction, the result being that the various sin'gle threads of the warp become matted together. The

more processes through which the warp is run separately the worse it runs in the beaming. The ideal condition would be to run them once only and have them ready for beaming. Prior to our invention this has never been accomplished, but we have been delivering to our beamers upward of 72 warps per da which have been entirel finished, boile out, dyed, oxidized, washe softened and dried in one single run. The

result has been a low cost of production and an improved product.

What we claim is:

1. The continuous method of treating warp in rope form which consists in preparing it and assing it between squeeze rollers, passing it over asset of rollers in a vat dye liquid, conducting it between squeeze rollers then-conducting it off to a distance to give proper exposure to air, then conducting 1t again into the same dye liquid over another series of rollers, then passing it between a pair of squeeze rollers and again conducting it off to a distance to give proper exposure to air, conducting it through a washing machine, thence through a dryer and thence to a coiler.

'2. The continuous method of treating warp in rope or chain form which consists in cleaning it and passing it between squeeze rollers, passing it over 'a set of rollers in a vat dye liquid, conducting it between squeeze rollers then conducting it off to a distance to give proper exposure to air, then conducting it again into the same dye liquid over another series of rollers, then passing it between a pair of squeeze rollers and again conducting it off to a distance to give proper exposure to air, conducting it through a washing machine, thence conductseries of rollers, then passing it between a air of squeeze rollers-and again conducting 1t oil to a distance to give proper exposure to air, conducting it through a washing machine, then conducting the warp through two washing vats, thence through a pair of squeeze rollers and through a dryer to a coiler.

4. The continuous 'method of treating warpin rope or chain form which consists in cleaning it and passing it between squeeze rollers, passing it over a set of rollers in a vat dye liquid, conducting it between squeeze rollers, then conducting it off to a distance to give proper exposure toair, then conducting it again into the same dye vat over another series of rollers, then passing it between a pair of squeeze rollers and again conducting it off to a distance to give proper exposure to air, conducting it through a washing machine, then through a pair of squeeze rollers, and'thence through a dryer and to coilers.

5. The continuous process of treating warp in r0 e or chain form which consists in laying t e fibres all in the same direction, boiling out the warp, dipping the warp in vat dye, oxidizing the warp, -re-dipp1ng same dye, again oxidizingit, washing it and drying it, and delivering it to a coiler.

8. The continuous process of treating warp in rope or chain form which consists in boiling out the warp, dipping the warp in a vat dye, oxidizing the warp, and redipping it in the same dye, again oxidizing the warp and washing it, and drying the warp, and agitating the dye in the vat.

9.- The continuous process of treating warp in rope or chain form which consists in boilingout the warp, dipping the Warp in a vat dye, oxidizing it, re-dipping it in the same dye, again oxidizing it, and re peating the dipping and oxidizing steps any number of successive times required to obtain the required shade, washing it and drying it.

10. The continuous method of treating long warp in rope or chain form which consists inv preparing the warp to absorb the exposure to the air between the dips into the dye liquid to obtain the required shade, and then conducting the warp through a dryer and thence .to a coiler, whereby white warp at the beginning of the process after one continuous run is delivered to the coiler dyed and dry.

11. The continuous process of treating warp in rope or chain form which consists in boiling out the warp, cooling it, dipping it in a vat dye liquid and oxidizing it, and repeating the dipping and oxidizing steps any number of successive times with exposure to the air between the dips into the dye liquid to obtain the required shade and then washing and drying the warp and thence delivering it to a coiler.

12. The continuous process of treating warp in a chain or rope form which consists in wetting the warp, dipping it in a vat dye liquid and oxidizing, and repeating the dipping and oxidizing steps to obtain the required shade, maintaining the dye at standard strength, and then washing and drying the warp and thence delivering it to a coiler.

13. The continuous method of treating contain l1qu1d to wet' and prepare the war to absorb the dye, and passing it througi squeeze rollers, thence passing under a set 0 rollers in the vat dyeing liquid, conducting it between squeeze rollers, thence conducting it to a distance to give proper exosnre to air for oxidizing, then conducting it again in to the same dye vat under another series of rollers, then conducting it off to a distance to ive proper exposure to air for oxidizing and repeating this dipping into the dye liquid any number of successive times with proper exposure to air between the dips into the dye liquid to obtain the required shade, then. conducting the warp through awashing vat and thence conducting it through a dryer and thence to a coiler.

14. The. continuous process of treating war inro e or chain form which consists in dipping it in a vat d e liquid and oxidizing it, and repeating t e dipping and oxidizing steps the necessary successive times to obtain the required shade, maintaining the dye at a standard strength, then washing and drying the warp and delivering it to a coiler.

15. The continuous process of treating war in rope or chain form which consists in dipping it in a vat d e 1i uid and oxidizing it, and re eating t e dipping and oxidizing steps t e necessary successive times to obtain the required shade, maintaining the vat dye at a standard strength, drying the warp and delivering it to a coiler.

In testimony whereof we afiix our signatures.

HAROLD MASON CHASE; GEORGE WILMOT ROBERTSON.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5359743 *Feb 8, 1991Nov 1, 1994Eduard Kusters Maschinenfabrik GmbhApplying first treatment liquor, squeezing out, applying second treatment liquor, feeding into heating zone of ager, guiding along zig-zag path of horizontal loops
US5802649 *Aug 21, 1997Sep 8, 1998FyproMethod and apparatus for dyeing a traveling textile strand
US5868010 *May 26, 1998Feb 9, 1999Fypro Thread Company, Inc.Method for dyeing a traveling textile strand
US5881411 *Dec 23, 1996Mar 16, 1999Fypro Thread Company, Inc.Twisted, dyed and bonded filaments
US20100107382 *Oct 28, 2009May 6, 2010Karl Mayer Textilmaschinenfabrik GmbhMethod and device for treating a warp thread sheet
US20100107383 *Oct 28, 2009May 6, 2010Karl Mayer Textilmaschinenfabrik GmbhDevice and method for treatment of a warp thread sheet
Classifications
U.S. Classification8/500, 8/504, 8/151, 8/931, 8/932, 8/653, 8/650
International ClassificationD06B3/04
Cooperative ClassificationD06B3/04, Y10S8/932, D06B2700/06, Y10S8/931
European ClassificationD06B3/04