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Publication numberUS1569231 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 12, 1926
Filing dateOct 24, 1917
Priority dateOct 24, 1917
Publication numberUS 1569231 A, US 1569231A, US-A-1569231, US1569231 A, US1569231A
InventorsMayo Etta
Original AssigneeUnited Shoe Machinery Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Shoemaking
US 1569231 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

- B. F. MAYO I SHOEMAKING Original Filed Oct. 24, 1917 Patented Jan. 12, 1926.

UNITED .STATES PATENT OFFICE.

BENJAMIN F. MAYO, OF'SALEM I, MASSACHUSETTS; ETTA MAYO, OF SALEM, MASSA- GHUSETTS, EXECUTE/IX OF SAID BENJAMIN F. MAYO, DECEASED, ASSIGNOB TO UNITED SHOE MACHINERY CORPORATION, OF PATERSON, NEW JERSEY, A COR- SHOEMAKING.

Application filed October 24, 1917, Serial N'o. 198,199. Renewed June 19, 1922. Serial No. 569,575-

2 '0 all whom it may concern: 1

Be it known that I, BENJAMIN a citizen of the United States, residing at Salem, in the county of Essex and Commonwealth of Massachusetts, have invented certain Improvements in Shoemaking, of'which the following description, in connection with the accompanying drawings, is a specification, like reference characters on the drawings indicating like parts in the several figures.

This invention relates to a method of relatively positioning the parts of shoes.

In the assembling of the parts of a shoe, the placing of the parts in the proper relative positions is a matter requiring considerable skill and care, since the appearance and quality of the shoe may be greatly imaired by even a slight displacement of the parts from their correct relative positions. One method of relatively locating the parts employed heretofore consists in making one or more gaging marks upon one of the parts to be relatively positioned and locating an edge of the other of said parts even with this mark. According to another method a series of edge gages have been employed, these gages first being located in a predetermined position with relationto one of the parts and the other of the parts then being positioned properly relatively to the first part by placing its edge or edges in engagement with these gages.

These methods are open to certain objections. In the first of these methods the relative placing of the parts is performed wholly by the eye and requires a great deal of care. It is often impracticable to determine absolutely the relative positions of the parts by means of such gaging marks and the assembling of the parts requires considerable skill and experience. When edge gages are employed for relatively locating the parts, such gages also ordinarily allow a certain amount of variation in the relative positions of the parts, so that the operation of relatively placing the parts requires some'skill and must be carefully performed. Neither of these methods insures the proper relative positioning of the parts; The assembling operation is often carelessly or unskillfully performed and imperfect work results.

F. MAYO,-

There are certain other difficulties involved in following either ofthese methods, particularly when one or both of the parts to be relatively positioned consists of thin, flexible material such as that of which the upper of a shoe is made. When two parts of an upper for a shoe of a certain size are died out, they have a certain predetermined outline, the dimensions of the one part corresponding to that of the other. After being cut to shape, the parts are usually rolled and tied in bundles and remain for some time in this condition before assembling. The result often is that when the parts reach the operator to be assembled they are warped or wrinkled, and the stock has shrunk to some extent, so that they will not lie properly in'position and that they do not correspond in dimensions. With the parts in such condition it is a very difficult matter to locate them in the proper relative positions by following either of the above methods. In order to follow either of these methods successfully it is practically essential that all wrinkles and unevennesses along the portions of the parts which are to overlap should be smoothed out, and that the parts should correspond in dimensions. When edge gages are employed, these gages are set for a certain predetermined outline of the part to be positioned. When the part is wrinkled or shrunk, thereby diminishing this predetermined outline, the gaging of the part from its edge may fail to locate the part properly. Furthermore, in such case it may be difficult or practically impossible to bring the edges of the part up to the several edge gages. Also, to locate a part consisting of thin, flexible material properly by means of an edge gage is a diflicult operation, since even a slight forcing of the edge of the part against the gage will result in an improper placing of the part.

One object of the present invention is to provide an improved process of relatively positioning the parts of shoes by which the parts may be more quickly and accurately assembled in the proper relative positions than could bedone by any process followed ieretofore.

Another object of the invention is to provide animproved process of relatively positioning the parts of shoes which will obviate the difficulties involved in the following of prior processes, which will insure the placing of the parts in their proper relative positions without the exercise of any particular skill or care on the part of the opera tor, and which will enable the parts readily to beheld in their proper relative positions.

With these objects in view the invention consists in the process involving the novel features hereinafter described and particu larly pointed out in the claims.

In the accompanying drawings forming a part of the present application, are illustrated the improved method as applied to the assembling of a vamp and a toe cap, and one form of apparatus which may convenie'ntly be employed in this method, the elements of which are constructed and arranged particularly for use in assembling these parts of a shoe. It is to be understood, however, that in its broader aspects the invention is not limited to use in the relative positioning of these or any other parts of an upper, but that it may be successfully employed in relatively positioning other parts of a shoe.

In the accompanying drawings, Figure 1 is a plan view of a shoe vamp treated in accordance with the method forming a part of the present invention; Fig. 2 is a plan view of a toe cap or tip of a shoe, treated in accordance with said method; and Fig. 3 is a perspective view illustrating a form of apparatus which may be employed in the process of assembling a vamp and a toe cap embodied in the work positioning and holding devices of a sewing machine for sewing one or more lines of stitches through the overlapping margins of the vamp and toe cap to attach the same together.

In preparing parts of a shoe upper which are to be relatively positioned in accordance with the illustrated manner of practicing the present invention, each part is provided with positioning surfaces at predetermined points specially shaped and arranged to control the location of the parts with relation to each other in the assembling opera tion. Preferably, in such assembling operation, the relative location of the parts is fixed by bringing these positioning surfaces into engagement with gages. The positioning surfaces may be provided either at the time when the parts are died or dinl'ed out or otherwise. out to shape, or at any convenient stage in the manufacture of the shoe. The surfaces may be of any suitable shape. Preferably, however, they are formed by gaging perforations or holes, in the parts of the shoe to be relatively positioned, through which a gaging tool or pin may be inserted. Each of said surfaces is made at a point having a predetermined relation to the contour of the'part on which it is placed such that when the parts are assembled and the surfaces are placed in predetermined relative positions the parts will be accurately located in predetermined relation to each other. Preferably each surface is formed by a perforation or hole located in such a relation to the contour of the part on which it is placed that the parts may be positioned properly with relation to each other by placing the perforations in registration or alignment. When two or more positioning surfaces are madeon each of the parts, the surfaces of the series on one of the parts preferably have the same spacing and relative arrangement as the surfaces of the series on the other of the parts, so that all of the several surfaces on the first part may be placed respectively in exact registration with the surfaces on the other part. When the parts are formed with perforations or holes in the stock, as above described, the perforations may be readily brought into exact registration by inserting a gaging tool through the corresponding perforations in the two parts. The gaging tool may consist of an suitable instrument of the proper size to ht the gaging perforations in the parts. In the construction which has been found to be particularly suitable for the operation, the gaging tools consist of pins mounted upon a support, spaced substantially the same distance apart and having the same relative arrangement as the perforations in one or both of the parts to be relatively positioned. The perforations in the parts are preferably made adjacent their margins or at, points such that they will not be visible in the finished shoe. The perforations may be made at any convenient distances apart. When the perforations are made adjacent the margins of the parts, the spacing of the perforations will vary in parts of different sizes. To accommodate different spacings of the parts to be relatively positioned the gaging pins may be relatively adjustable to vary their distances apart.

In Fig. 1 of the drawings is illustrated the vamp of a shoe, indicated by the reference numeral 2, having positioning surfaces formed by perforations or holes 4: in the stock adjacent the forward margin of the vamp. In Fig. 2 is illustrated a toe cap or tip indicated by the reference numeral 6, having positioning surfaces formed by perforations or holes 8 in the stock adjacent the rear margin of the toe cap, the perforations 8 being of substantially the same size as the perforations 4: in the vamp. The perforations 4 in the vamp are spaced substantially the same distance apart as the perforations 8 in the toe cap and the perforations 4 in the vamp and the perforations 8 in the toe cap are located relatively to the outline of these parts in predetermined positions such that when the toe cap is placed on the vamp and the perforations 8 are brought into registration with the perforations 4 the toe cap will be located accurately in the proper position relative to the vamp. It is to be noted that in this method of relatively placing the parts, the parts are relatively located laterally, longitudinally and angularly in the correct positions. As illustrated in the drawing, the perforations ion the vamp are symmetrically placed relatively to the lateral edges of. the forward portion of the vamp, and are each spaced the same predetermined distance from the forward edge of the vamp, and the perforations upon the toe cap are symmetrically. placed with relation to the lateral edges of the rear portion of the toe cap, and are each spaced the same predetermined distance from the rear edge of the toe cap.

In assembling the tip and the vamp after being perforated as described, the tip is placed with its rear margin overlapping the forward margin of the vamp, and is located relatively to the vamp by placing the corresponding perforations in the parts in exact registration. The vamp is formed with an arcuate forward edge, and the toe cap is formed with an arcuate rear edge, the radius of which is somewhat greater than that of the forward edge of the vamp. With the gaging perforations located in the Vamp and toe cap as described, the bringing of these'perforations into registration will place the rear edge of the toe cap substantially in concentric relation to the forward edge of the vamp. The bringing of the perforations into exact registration may be very easily performed without the exercise of any particular-skill or care,by inserting a gaging pin through the corresponding perforations in the two parts. Such gaging pins may consist of any suitable instruments of the proper size to fit the perforations, and may be held and manipulated by hand. Gaging pins, however, having the construction and arrangement illustrated in Fig. 3 of the drawings, may be convenientlv employed.

In Fig. 3 of the drawings are illustrated work positioning and holding devices particularly designed for machines for sewing one or more lines of stitches through the overlapping margins of a toe cap and a vamp, and comprising a pair of gage pins adjustably mounted on the work support or work plate of the machine and devices for clamping the parts in position after having been properly located relatively to each other and to the work clamp. The construction illustrated in the drawings is designed particularly to be embodied" in a machine havingsubstantially the same construction 1 and arrangement of parts as the machine illustrated and describedin applicants Patent No. 1,174,750, dated March 7, 1916. In the drawings, 10 indicates the work plate of the machine, 12 the lower member of the work clamp, 14 the upper member of the clamp connected with the lower member by a hinged joint 16, 18 a cam for engaging the upper memberof the clamp to hold thesame. in closed relation to the lower member of the clamp pivoted on the stud '20 and having an operating handle 22, 26 a frame sup- 7 and mode of operation as the corresponding parts of the machine illustrated and described in applicants patent referred to above. In this machine, devices not shown on the drawings of this application are provided for iding the work clamp in an arcuate pat to locate the lines of stitches properly in the overlapping margins of the toe cap and vamp.

The gaging pins for use in relatively positioning the toe cap and vamp and for 10- eating these parts properly in the work clamp, are indicated at 30 and 32. These pins are mounted on the frame 26, and are arranged to project upwardly through slots 34 and 36 in the work plate when the frame 26 is in elevated position. The pins are preferably located at substantially the same distances from the center about which the work clamp swings. The length of the pins is such that when elevated they will project above the lower member 12 of the work clamp far enough to pass through the perforations in both the vamp and the toe cap when these parts are superposed and the pins inserted through the perforations therein. The pins are similarly mounted on the frame 26 so that they may be adjusted laterally of the work support and work clamp to suit dilferent spacings of the perforations made in the parts of the shoe. The gage pins 30 and 32 are mounted on blocks 38 and 46 supported on an adjusting rod provided with right and left handed threaded portions and 48 engaging the blocks. The

adjusting rod is mounted in bearings in pro- 1 jections 42 and 50 on the frame 26, and carries at one end a milled-edged disk 44, and at the other end a milled-edged disk 52, by which "the rod may be turned to adjust the gage pins.

In assembling and locating properly a vamp and toe cap formed with gaging perforations as illustrated in Figs..1 and 2 with the construction illustrated in Fig.3,

,assuming that the frame 26 is elevated so devices, and 28 a depreseer bar for that the gage pins 30 and the lower mei'nber of the clamp, and that the pins are adjusted properly for the spacing of the perforations in the parts, the amp is laid on the work support and lower member of the clamp and the gage pins 30 and 32 are inserted through the perforations l: in the vamp. When the vamp has been thus properly lo-ca ed relatively to the work clamp, the toe cap is placed in the clamp with its rear margin overlapping the for ward margin of the vamp, andthegage pins are then inserted in the gaging perforations 5% in the cap. If the vamp or the toe cap is wrinkled or warped, as is often the case after the parts have been rolled and tied in bundles, or has become shrunk, the distance between the perforations may be somewhat less than the spacing of the gage pins. In such case, the part is given the proper lateral dimension by stretching the same laterally until the spacing of the gaging perforations is just suthcient to allow the pins to be inserted in the perforations. The gaging pins thus determine the proper lateral dimensions of the parts. The stretching to which the parts are subjected in placing them in position will not only extend the overlapping portions thereof to their proper absolute and relative dimensions, but will smooth out all wrinkles and irregularities in these features so that they will lie evenly in superposed relations. After the parts are in place, the pins will then preserve the proper dimensions of the overlapping portions of the parts and the proper relative positions of the parts until the work clamp is closed. The parts are thus located accurately in proper relation to each other and in proper position in the work clamp much more readily, than could be done by any method heretofore followed, and the correct positioning of the parts is absolutely insured without any particular skill or care on the part of the operator.

After the parts have been located in the clamp, as described, the upper member of the clamp may be depressed to hold the parts securely in the proper positions, and the frame 26 may be lowered to withdraw the pins below the upper surface of the work support. The parts are then held in the clamp in the proper position for sewing.

Having pointed out the nature and object of the invention, and having specifically described the manner in which it may be applied and the construction in which it may be embodied, what is claimed is:

' 1. A method of relatively positioning two parts of the upper of a shoe and securing the same together which comprises making gaging perforations in each of said parts at 82 project above predetermined points, extending the parts to their proper lateral dimensions, relatively locating the parts at all points adjacent the line along which the fastenings are'to-be inserted, and holding the'same extendedto their proper lateral dimensions byinserting in said gaging perforations gaging tools located in predetermined relative positions, and inserting fastenings-to secure the parts together.

2. A method of relatively positioning'two parts of the upper of a shoe-and securing the same together which comprises making gaging perforations in each of said: parts at predetermined points, placing gagingtools in predetermined relative positions, extending the parts to their proper lateral dimensions, relatively locating the parts at all points adjacent the line along which thefastenings are to be inserted, and holding'the parts extended to their proper lateral dimensions by inserting sai-dgaging tools'in said gaging perforations, and insertingfastenings in the parts to secure the same together.

A method of relatively positioning two parts of the upper of a shoeand securing the same together vhich comprises providing each of said parts with positioning surfaces shaped to locate at predeterminedpoints in saidparts, assemblingsaid parts, and rela tively positioning thesame by placing-the positionirig-surfaces on the two parts in predetermined positions withrelation to gages, temporarily securing theparts in the relative positions in Wl11Cl1 they aretnus assembled, withdrawing the gages from operating positions, and inserting fastenings to-secure the parts together.

4. A method of relatively positioning two parts ofthe upper of a shoe and securing the same together which comprises making gaging perforations in each of said parts-at predetermined points, inserting gaging tools in said perforations to locate'the' parts in predetermined relative positions, temporarily securing the parts in the positions in which they are thus assembled to a movable support, withdrawing the gaging toolsifrom the perforations in said parts, and inserting fastenings to secure the parts together.

5. A method of relatively positioning a vamp and a toe cap and securing the same together which comprises makingtwo or more gaging perforationsin a vamp adjacent its forward edge andin predetermined relation to its forward and lateral edges, making two or more gaging perforations in the toe capadjacent its rear edge and in predetermined'relation to its rear and lateral edges having the same spacing as the perforations in the vamp, assembling the toecap and the vamp, extending the same to their proper lateral dimensions, locating the parts in predetermined relative positions at all points adjacent the line along which the has tenors are to be inserted and" holding the same extended to' their proper lateral dimen- 'sions by inserting gaging tools in the perforations in the two parts to bring the perforations into exact registration, and while holding the parts in the positions in which they are thus assembled, presenting the same to fastener inserting mechanism.

6. A method of relatively positioning a vamp and a toe cap and securing the same together which comprises making gaging perforations in a vamp adjacent its forward edge and in predetermined relation to its forward and lateral edges, making gaging perforations in the toe cap adjacent its rear edge and in predetermined relation to its rear and lateral edges and having the same spacing as the perforations in the vamp, 1ocating gaging tools in predetermined relative positions, assembling the vamp and toe cap, extending the same to their proper lateral dimensions, locating the parts in predetermined relative positions at all points adjacent the line along which the fasteners are to be inserted and holding the same extended to their proper lateral dimensions by inserting said gaging tools in the perforations in the two parts to bring the perforations into exact registration, and while holding the parts in the positions in which they are thus assembled, presenting the same to fastener inserting mechanism.

7. A method of relatively positioning two parts of the upper of a shoe and securing the same together which consists in making gaging perforations in each of said parts at predetermined points, placing said parts on a movable support, locating said parts in predetermined positions with relation to each other by inserting gaging tools in said perforations, securing said parts temporarily to said support in the positions in which they are thus assembled, and guiding said support in a predetermined path with relation to fastener inserting mechanism.

8. That improvement in methods of making shoes which consists in providing two parts of an upper each with positioning surfaces at predetermined points specially shaped and arranged to control the location of said parts, and assembling said parts in relative fixed positions controlled by the use of said surfaces.

9. That improvement in methods of making shoes which consists in providing a plurality of different parts of an upper with positioning surfaces located respectively at predetermined points in said parts which will be invisible in the finished shoe and shaped and arranged to control the location of said parts, and securing said parts together in relative fixed positions controlled by the use of said surfaces.

10. That improvement in methods of making shoes which consists in providing two parts of an upper each with a plurality of gaging holes and securing said parts togeth= er in relative fixed the use of said holes.

positionscontrolled by 11. That improvement in methods of making shoes which consists in providing two parts of an upper each with gaging holes, fixing the relative positions of said parts by inserting gaging pins in said holes and securing the parts togetherin the relative po sitions thus fixed.

12. That improvement in methods of making shoes which consists in providing two parts of an upper each with a plurality of gaging holes in a portion of the part which will be invisible in the finished shoe, impaling the parts in said holes and aligning corresponding holes so asto fix the relative positions of said parts, and securing said parts together in the relative positions thus 13. That improvement in methods of making shoes which consists in providing two parts of an upper each with positioning surfaces at predetermined points shaped and arranged to control the location of said parts, fixing the relative positions of said parts by bringing the positioning surfaces on the parts into engagement with gages, and securing the parts together in the relative positions thus fixed.

14. That improvement in methods of making shoes which consists in providing the tip and the vamp of an upper each with gaging holes at opposite sides of said parts, impaling the tip and vamp in said holes and aligning corresponding holes so as to fix the relative positions of the tip and vamp, and stitching the tip and vamp together in the relative positions thus fixed.

15. That improvement in methods of making shoes which consists in providing each of a plurality of different parts of a shoe with positioning surfaces located respectively at predetermined points in said parts which will be invisible in the finished shoe, utilizing said surfaces and means oooperating therewith for locating adjacent parts of the shoe in predetermined relation to each other, and securing said parts together in such relation by fastening means other than said co-operating means.

16. That improvement in methods of making shoes which consists in providing each of two different parts of a shoe with gaging holes located in predetermined relation to the contour of the part and in a portion of the part which will be invisible in the finished shoe, locating said parts of the shoe in predetermined relation to each other by engaging said parts in said holes, and by a separate operation securing said parts together while they are maintained in such reation.

17. That improvement in methods of making shoes which consists in forming at predetermined points on two different parts of shoe positioning surfaces which are located respectively in predetermined relation both to the contour of the part on which they are formed and also to like positioning surfaces on the other part, utilizing said positioningsurfaces for positively locating said parts of the shoe in predetermined relation to each other, and 3y a separate operation securing said parts together while they are maintained in such relation.

18. That improvement in methods of makingshoes which consists in forming at predetermined points on two dii ferent parts of a shoe which are to be secured together with overlapping edges positioningsu'rfaces which are located respectively in predetermined re=lation both to the contour of the part on which they are formed and also to like positioning surfaces on the other part,

positively locating said parts in predetermined relation to each other with their edges overlapping by engaging said positioning surfaces, and securing said parts together while they are maintained in such relation.

19. That improvement in methods of making shoes whichconsists in forming on different parts of a shoe-gaging holes located at predetermined points with relation to the contours of the respective parts, positively locating said parts laterally, longitudinally and angularly in correct relation to each other by impaling the parts inv said holes and secnring'said parts together while they are maintained in such relation.

In testimony whereof I have signedv my name to this specification.

BENJAMIN F. MAYO.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2965909 *Jan 6, 1958Dec 27, 1960United Shoe Machinery CorpHeel end assembling and breast line lasting machines
US3216383 *Feb 4, 1963Nov 9, 1965Necchi SpaDevice for sewing trimmings
US3988993 *Jul 26, 1974Nov 2, 1976Usm CorporationPallet for registering and securing a workpiece
US4593634 *Oct 11, 1984Jun 10, 1986Suave Shoe CorporationApparatus and method for joining the parts of shoe uppers by stitching
US4659420 *Apr 14, 1986Apr 21, 1987Usm CorporationDeposting and fusing configured powder into a laminate and adhering to substrate
US5146859 *Jun 20, 1991Sep 15, 1992Mim Industries, Inc.Adjustable clamp for use in a sewing machine
US5163376 *Sep 6, 1991Nov 17, 1992Mim Industries, Inc.Tubular seaming system
US5261340 *Feb 19, 1991Nov 16, 1993Mim Industries, Inc.Detachable template clamp having a removable sewing template
US5421277 *Sep 11, 1992Jun 6, 1995Mim Industries, Inc.Sewing machine
US5427043 *Mar 28, 1991Jun 27, 1995Mim Industries, Inc.Workpiece pallet having a detachable workpiece holder and method of sewing a workpiece
US5445090 *Jul 25, 1991Aug 29, 1995Mim Industries, Inc.Interchangeable clamp for use in a sewing machine
US5509367 *Nov 16, 1992Apr 23, 1996Mim Industries, Inc.Clamp having adjustable presser members
US5632214 *Jun 6, 1995May 27, 1997Mim Industries, Inc.For use in a programmable sewing machine
US5666895 *Jan 20, 1995Sep 16, 1997Mim Industries, Inc.Adjustable clamp
Classifications
U.S. Classification12/146.00C, 12/52, 12/DIG.300, 12/61.00A, 112/475.9, 112/470.14
International ClassificationA43D11/00, A43B9/00
Cooperative ClassificationA43B9/00, A43D11/00, Y10S12/03
European ClassificationA43B9/00, A43D11/00