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Publication numberUS1571140 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 26, 1926
Filing dateJun 1, 1925
Priority dateJun 1, 1925
Publication numberUS 1571140 A, US 1571140A, US-A-1571140, US1571140 A, US1571140A
InventorsO'connor Michael Florance
Original AssigneeO'connor Michael Florance
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Neurovertameter
US 1571140 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 26 1 926.

- 1,571,140 M. F. OCONNOR NEUROVERTAMETER Filed June 1, 1925 2 Sheets-Sheet l WITNESSES INVENTOR ATTORNEYS Jan. 26 1926. 1,511,140 M. F. OCONNOR NEUROVERTAMETER Filed June 1, 1925 2 Sheets-$11991 WITNESSES INVENTOR W Ali O'Connor,

ATTORNEYS bar is capable of swinging horizontally upon the spindle but is locked in position by means of a set screw 13. The block 4 rides upon 'a shoulder formed between the standards and the reduced spindle. The spindle carries suitable means 14; to hold the block in place.

An upright arm 15, being a practical continuation 0f the standard 12, provides the support for the pulley 16 over which the cable runs. The lower extremity of the cable is attached to a screw eye 17 in the extremity of the base bar 1. The pulley 16 is mounted by any suitable means 18. The standard 12 fits into a base 19 in which it is adjusted as to height and held by a thumb screw 20.

Flanges 21 at the sides of the measuring sleeve 2 have openings for the passage of bolts or other securing means 22 by which a head plate 23 and bracket 24- (Figs. 1 and 4:) are held together in common. The brackets form part of a rod 25 which is slid able in a socket 26 upon the base bar 1, and held to its adjustment by a thumb screw 27. The socket is suitably attached to the base bar, for example by means of a threaded extension 28 as in Figure 5. Upon loosening the thumb screw 27 the rod 25 is slid in the socket 26 thereby adjusting the measuring sleeve 2 along the bar 1, and the plate 23 in reference to the head of the patient.

A. pair of steel spring clasps 29 are intended to grip the sides of the adjusting table T and thus steady the device when in use. These clasps are suitably mounted on the base bar 1, for example by means of a bolt 30 and they are capable of being swung up out of the way when not in use.

A measuring template 31 (Fig. 10) is used in connection with the measuring sleeve 2. This template is composed of a flat metal sheet having a slot 32 which permits slipping over the measuring sleeve (Fig. 1). The sides of the slot are graduated in inches as at 33, and the lower edges of the template at the lateral sides of the slot are also graduated in inches as at 34.

The sides and top of the measuring sleeve 2 are graduated in inches as at 35. These various graduations are important in marking locations on the back of the patient as presently appears. The template 31 has an opening 36 by means of which it is readily handled by the operator.

The operation is readily understood. As before stated, the impinged nerves are located either by palpation or by means of such a device as the neurocalometer, the patient being seated, pencil marks being made on the patients back showing the location of the impinged nerves mentioned. By vertebral papation the vertebrae causing the impingement of the nerves are located and pencil marks are made on the patients back showing the locations of the subluxated vertebrae. The patient is then placed face downward on the adjusting table T, the head piece of which is split,

care being taken to obtain the correct distance between the front and back parts of the adjusting table (known as the table distance).

Careful palpation is again made relocating the subluxated vertebrae, this being necessary for the reason that the pencil marks sometimes change position as compared with the location of the subluxated vertebrae when the patient is seated. hen these subluxations have been carefully located and pencil marks are made on the patients back indicating the location, a record of the locations of the subluxations is made through the aid of the improved neurovertameter as follows:

The bar 1 is swung around over the patients back and lowered by means of the thun'ib screw 20 so as to touch the patients head, the spine between the shoulders and the center of the sacrum (Fig. 1). The spring clasps 29 are swung down to grip the sides of th adjusting table so as to steady the bar 1.

Upon loosening the thumb screw 27 the measurlng sleeve 2 1s slid along the bar 1 until the head plate 23 rests against the top of the patients head. The thumb screw 27 is then tightened, keeping the head plate rest ing against the patients head. The measuring template 31 is now fitted over the measuring sleeve 2 to find the distance from the top of the patients head to the various subluxations, as follows:

The measuring template 31 is made to straddle the measuring sleeve 2 so that it tits at right angles thereto, the lower edge being brought into registration with one of the pencil marks on the patients back. This mark indicates the location of the first subluxation. By keeping the template upright and parallel with the graduations on the sleeve 2 the number of inches from the top of the patients head to the subluxa-tion A will be registered on the measuring sleeve. Th vertical graduations 33 on the template 31 may be employed as auxiliary checks in liceiving account of the distance between the bottom of the measuring sleeve 2 and the surface of the patients back. The graduations 34 can be used to detect a right or left high hip (bone), and to locate the apex of the lateral curvature of the spine caused by same. Record is made of all other pencil mar rs (there usually being several) in a similar manner.

When the patient returns for another adjustment from the original analysis he is at once placed upon the adjusting table, using the sa me table distanc as used in the analy sis. The bar 1 of the neurovertameter is swung around over the patients body and lowered as before over the head, the spine between the shoulders, and the center of the sacrum. The measuring sleeve 2 is then moved along until th head plate 23 rests against the head. The thumb screw 27 is tightened. By use of the movable measuring template 31 and by the measurements recorded upon the analysis card it becomes an easy matter to relocate the former subluxations and to indicate them on the patient back by means of pencil marks such as A (Fig. 1). The neurovertameter is then swung back parallel with the wall of the room, out of the way. Needed adjustments are then made according to the pencil marks on the patients back.

While the construction and arrangement of the improved neurovertameter or gauge is that of a generally preferred form, obviously modifications and changes may be made without departing from the spirit of the invention or the scope of the claims.

I claim 1. A device for assisting the recording and the relocation of subluxations in chiropractic and comprising a graduated measuring element, means by which said element is held suspended in the direction of the spine of a human body to be treated, means associated with said element to touch a portion of said body thereby to establish a gauge for the positioning of said element, and a movable template to straddle said element and contact the body, said template having graduations coacting with said element and with the surface of the body to fix the desired locations.

2. A gauge for use in combination with an adjustment table in the art of chiropractic and comprising a fixture, a measuring element carried by said fixture for tree swinging motion from side to side including a position over said table and human body reclining thereon, means associated with the measuring element to grip a portion of the table and thereby steady said element, means associated with said element to touch a portion of the body and thereby establish predeterlfiin ed relationship of said element with said body, and a freely movable template straddling and coacting with the measuring element and said body to establish the location of certain desired regions upon said body.

3. A device for use in combination with an adjustment table in the art of chiropractic and comprising a fixture, a gauging element swingably mounted upon said fixture and intended to be swung in position over a body reclining on the table, and resilient means carried by said gauging element to temporarily grip a portion of the table while said element is in operative use.

4. A device for use in combination with an adjustment table in the art of chiropractie and comprising a fixture, a gauging ele ment swingably mounted upon said fixture and intended to be swung in position over a body reclining on a table, resilient means carried by said gauging element to temporarily grip a portion of the table while said element is in operative use, and means in corporated in said fixture and permitting adjustments of said standard to bodily raise and lower said gauging element and said gripping means in respect to the body and table.

5. A neurovertameter comprising a stand ard, a base bar carried thereby, means to support said base bar in a substantially parallel position in respect to and above the spine of a human body, a graduated measuring sleeve slidable upon said bar, a head plate carried by said sleeve intended to touch the head of the body to establish a relationship of the measuring sleeve with the body, to fix the position of said sleeve and plate upon the bar, and a template fitted over the measuring sleeve and being used in a predetermined manner in connection therewith in order to establish certain locations upon the surface of said body.

6. A neurovertameter comprising a standard, a base bar swingably mounted upon the standard, means by which the base bar is suspended upon the standard in position over a human body to be treated, a graduated measuring sleeve slidable upon the bar but frictionally held thereon during adjustment, a plate to touch the head of the human body and thereby establish the relationship of said sleeve to the body, a rod secured in common through the plate and sleeve, means by which the rod can be secured to the bar to fix the adjustment of said sleeve, and a measuring template having a slot permitting straddling of the measuring sleeve to coact with the graduations thereof to establish certain desired locations upon said body.

7. A neurovertameter comprising a fixture including a base and a standard which is adjustable in respect thereto, a block swivelly but adjustably mounted upon the standard, a T-shaped base bar hinged upon said block and having limited movement in respect thereto, suspending means for the bar including a weighted cable supported by the standard, a graduated measuring sleeve slidable upon the bar, a head plate having a rod, means securing the rod,head plate and measuring sleeve together, means on the bar including a socket and thumb screw coacting with the rod and securing adjustments of the measuring sleeve, and a measuring template arranged to straddle the measuring sleeve and coact with the graduations thereof in determining desired locations upon a body to be treated.

MICHAEL FLORANCE OCONNOR.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4072144 *Jan 21, 1976Feb 7, 1978Marco Antonio PelosiInstrument and method for measuring urethral defects in patients with urinary stress incontinence
US4653509 *Jul 3, 1985Mar 31, 1987The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The Air ForceGuided trephine samples for skeletal bone studies
US4686997 *Nov 13, 1986Aug 18, 1987The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The Air ForceSkeletal bone remodeling studies using guided trephine sample
US5156162 *Aug 29, 1991Oct 20, 1992Gerhardt John JScoliosis measurement instrument with midline leg member
US5203569 *Jan 16, 1992Apr 20, 1993Golf Research Technology CorporationGolf stance trainer
US7883477 *Oct 26, 2005Feb 8, 2011Nihon UniversityHuman body backbone measuring/displaying system
US20070249966 *Apr 19, 2006Oct 25, 2007Hunter Mark IDevice and method for measuring urethral angle
US20080208080 *Oct 26, 2005Aug 28, 2008Nihon UniversityHuman Body Backbone Measuring/Displaying System
Classifications
U.S. Classification33/515, 600/594
International ClassificationA61H39/02, A61B5/107, A61B19/00
Cooperative ClassificationA61B5/6831, A61B5/107, A61H39/02, A61B19/46, A61B5/704
European ClassificationA61B19/46, A61H39/02, A61B5/107