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Publication numberUS1572381 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 9, 1926
Filing dateApr 5, 1922
Priority dateApr 5, 1922
Publication numberUS 1572381 A, US 1572381A, US-A-1572381, US1572381 A, US1572381A
InventorsCowles Irving
Original AssigneeCowles Irving
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Auxiliary charge-forming device for automobiles
US 1572381 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

l 8 2 7 5 l Sl E L w O C Feb. 9 1926.

AUXILIARY CHARGE FORMING DEVICE FOR AUTOMOBILES Filed April 5, 1922 Feb. 9 1926.

l. COWLES lunuLIARY CHARGE FORMING DEVICE FORAUTOHOBILES Filed April 5, 1922 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 Fei. 9 1926.

I. COWLES AUXILIARY CHARGE FORMING DEVICE FOR ATOuoILns Filed 1p1-i1 5, 1922 3 Sheets-Sheet 5 Patented Feb. 9, 1926.

Y UNITED STATES.

ravine ooivLns, ,or CHICAGO, ILLINOIS.

AUXILIAR/Y. CHARGE-FORMING DEVISE FOR AUTVOMOBLES.'

Application filed April 5,A

To all whom t may concer-vi.'

Be it. known' that' I, InviNG Cowiiics, a citizenot, the United States, residing at Ghicago, in tlie county of Cook and State oli' Illinois, have invented certain new andi uselul Improvements in Auxiliary ChargelormingDevices for Automobiles, of' whichv the` following is specification;

This invention relates to devices for ifa# cilitating'V the starting oit: gas engines, and particularly hydrocarbon engines, lwhen cold, through the introduction manually to the intake manifold ot the-engine otl an ex? plosive mixture or" i'uel'vaporand air.` Devices o'ttliis general character areI mainly1 used iior primingtlie engine in coldlweather when the temperature ottlienianitold andI engine cylinder is-too low to eilect vaporiza'- tion of the gasoline or other volatile liquid fuel, and the obtaining` or an explosive mixture citen requires a considerableperiod of idle engine operation involvingboth battery and liuel waste, and other objectionable resuits.

Most all so-called primers operate-011 the principle ot merely iniecting liquid gaso-Y line directly into the engine cylinder or in- Y take manifold, in lieu of pulling gasoline-in by suction strokes ot' the engine.V Such primers are inetiicient for the reason that, while they may reduce tlieniuscularor battery energy required to raise the gasoline, yet they do not etl'ect any vaporization and admixture ol the latter with theair'to form a charge'which willv explode when ignited. Other-.primers operate upon theprincipleot' injecting into the cylinder or intake mani- 't'old an explosive charge previously pie pared in the primer itself. This is the cor` rect principle 'for a satisfactory and etticient primer, and is the broad 'type ot primer to which my ypresent invention relates. In this type ot' primer, however, itis quite essential, in order to secure the inost' satis factory results, not onlythat liquid ueh be vapor-ined and mixed with air but that the two ingredients of the explosive charge be supplied in suoli predetermined and n'ieasured proportions that the working charge will instantly ignite and' burn throughout when subjected tothe electric spark; and hence one object of my present invention is to provide an improved device wherein, on each suction stroke ot the piston or plunger. thereof, an accurately and i'nechanically measured charge of gasoline i922; semaine. 549,941@

or other. liquidlf'uel will be introduced to the varying heights ot litt of the liquid supply tounitetlierein withl the proper proportion of atmospheric,V air to forni an explosive mixture.

A. still further and important object ot' the invention( is to provide a device of the.'

character above outlined which shall posn sess theiui'ther'tunction and capability of an Vauxiliary carburetor', todo away with thechoker` almost universally used to encylinder ot' the device irrespective of the richthemixture'when starting, andto thus avoid the objectionable results which accoin` pany the use of the choker, liquid gas in the cylinders, over carbonization in the cylinders, and dilution ofI the ylubricating oil in the crank case;

Another object is to provide ail-improved device tor automatically and mechanicallytoo much measuring the charge ot liquid fueladiiiit` l ventioii, in whichu Fig. l is a longitudinal axial section showing my improved charge-forming device mounted on the dash of an automobile, with the piston or plunger at a position. in which the device functions as an auxiliary carburetor to enrich the mixture;

Fig. Q'is a similar view showing the piston or plunger at the end. of. its inward or expelling stroke, in which position the in l take and discharge ports are both sealed;

Fig. 3- is a similar view, omitting the measuring device, showing the piston or plunger' at the limit of its outward or suction stroke;

Fig. t is an end elevation, viewed from the rightv of Fig. l; and

Figs. 5, 6, 7, 8, 9y and l0v are cross sectional details taken on the corresponding lines of Figs. Zand 3.

Referring to the diawings,l l0 designates a pump cylinder provided near its outer end. with a flange il fitting the dash board l2 of anautomobile and rigidly attached there to by screw bolts 13, the cylinder lO extend? ing through an opening 14 in the dash. The

outer end of the cylinder, beyond the flange 11, is threaded to receive a capv15, and withis fitted a thin metal valve sleeve 18, and

through this sleeve and a registering aperture in the cap 15 extends a tubular piston rod 19, in the outer end of which is secured a handle or knob`20. Y

The inner end of the stem 19 is attached to the hollow stem 21 of a hollow piston or plunger body 22, this latter having a longitudinal bore 23 terminating at its lower end in a valve seat 24, and a valve chamber 25, within which is mounted a conical check valve 26. The chambered portion of the pis-- ton is formed with a permanent shoulder 27 and a sliding shoulder oi" gland 28, between which is an asbestos and graphite packing 29 that insures an air tight joint of the plunger with the wall of the cylinder, the gland 28 being backed by a compression spring 30 which in turn is footed on an annular washer 31 locked to the piston by a ring 32. This asbestos and graphite packing 29, which seals the plunger head, is not disintegrated by gasoline, like an ordinary cup leather, since it is a ylubricant in the presence of gasoline.

Loosely articulated tothe forward end of the plunger is a cap shaped metal valvehead 33 of slightly less diameter than the internal diameter of the cylinder 10, and having on its forward face an insert 33 of soft metal or the like. The head 33` is coupled to the plunger proper by a cross pin 34 extending through a central boss of the head and through the circumferential wall of the latter and also passing through slots 36 in the forwardly projecting end portion of the valve chamber of the plunger which lies within the cap shaped head 33. Fitted within the cap shaped head 33 and encircling the boss 35 is an annular washer 37 formed with a convex outer side that constitutes, in co-operation `with the beveled lower end 38 of the plunger head, a swivel joint between the plunger and the head 33, for a purpose hereinafter described. The boss 35 is formed with a reduced extension 35 forming a mandrel for a light coil spring 39 lying within the hollow check-valve 26 and normally holding the latter to its seat 24. In the piston stein 19, ,somewhatinwardly of the knob 20 are formed a pairof air inlet ports 40.

The lower end of the cylinder-10 is closed by a head 41 suitablycored to provide an oil intake duct 42 and a mixture discharge duct 43 located above the oil duct. Tapped into the head 41 and communicating with the oil duct 42 is a hollow coupling 4 4 to the outer end of which is connected a gasoline line pipe 45 which, with an yinterposed measuring device, connects into the main gasoline pipe 46 extending from the tank to the carburetor. In the Y'primer line 45 isincorporated a gasoline measuring device shown in Figs. 1 and 2 and consisting of a tubular casing 47 containing a. measuring chamber 48 and upper and lower valve seats 49 and 50, the latter of which is controlled by an ordinary ballcheck valve 5l. Within the chamber 48 is a measuring valve 52 that cooperates with the upper valve seat 49. This measuring valve 52, in order to render it sensitive to the suction impulses of the pump, is mounted on a cylindrical float 53 of cork or like material whichsubstantially neutralizes the gravity effect of the metal head 52 of the valve and gives to the complete structure a combined specific gravity only slightly greater than that of the gasoline. The valve 52, 53 lits the chamben 48 with suicient looseness to allow the gasoline to `flow past the same, and the valve yis preferably provided with Vminute longitudinal and transverse bleed ducts 54, 55, as shown in Fig. 1, for a purpose hereinafter described.

Into the duct 43 of the cylinder head 41' is tapped a hollow coupling 56 that comn municates at its outer end with a pipe 57 leading into the intake manifold. IVithin the coupling 56 is a valve chamber 58 containing` a tapered outwardly opening check valve 59 that co-operates with a valve seat 60 on the inner end of the coupling 56.

In the operation of the device for starting a cold engine,`assuming that the parts are in the relative positions shown in Fig. 2, which is its normal idle position, the operator grasps the knob 2O and draws the plunger outwardly, compressing the spring 17. During the first portion of the outward movement the ports 40 of the plunger stem are covered by the sleeve 18 until the stem has reached the position shown in Fig. 1. This creates a ypartial vacuum below the plunger which first draws check valve 59 to its seat and then pulls a measured charge of gasoline through pipe 45 and coupling 44 into the cylinder until thekports 40 have passed the cap 15 as shown in Fig. 1. Thereupon atmospheric air flows through the ports'40 and hollow valve stem and plunger, instantly unseating the valve 26 and flowing thence Vover the opened cone washer 37, out of and around the head 33 and thence into the cylinder, cominingling with the previously induced charge of gasoline. This gasoline charge is measured as to volume by the valve Gil 54C. It will be noted that no air is admitted to the mixing chamber until the ports l0 have been uncovered, whereby a suticient degree of vacuum has been created to. quickly overcome the resistance of the light valve spring 39 and cause the valve 26 to open admitting the air to the cylinder. At this point the check valve 5l drops toits seat and the measuring valve 52 also falls to its lowermost point. As the `plunger continues its outward movement to the extreme position shown in Fig. 3, air also in a measured volume determined by theV diameter of the cylinder and the length of the outward piston stroke after ports have been uncovered flows into the cylinder and into the presence of the previously induced gasoline, forming with the latter a combustible charge. On the return or inward stroke of the plunger, the check valve 26, being no longer subject to suction, `instantly -seats itself under the thrust of its spring 39. The gasoline and air are thus trapped and, as the plunger' moves inwardly, aie further commingled 'and Iforced out past the check-valve 59 which still more thoroughly commingles them, into and through the discharge line 57, and thence into the intake manifold.

A few strokes of the 'pump plunger sufliices toill the intake manifold with an explosive mixture of gasoline vapor and air.

It will be observed that in the operation of the device the air is not drawn into the cylinder simultaneously with the gasoline, but the latter is lirst induced in a predetermined mechanically measured amount, and then the air is subsequently introduced in a measured volume through the balance of the outward stroke of the plunger' the instant the ports -lO are uncovered, filling the remining space of the cylinder.

As stated in the preamble, the device may also be used as an auxiliary carburetor to enrich the mixture after the engine is started and before it ,reaches a normal working temperature. The position of the parts when the device is thus being used is illustrated in F l, wherein the plunger` stem has been retracted sui'iiciently far to expose the air intake ports 40. The suction in the manifold draws a small amount of gasoline through the bleed ducts 55, 54 of the measuring valve 52, and this gasoline meets and joins a current of air induced through the hollow plunger stem and head. This mixture is somewhat richer than the normal mixture flowing through the carburetor, and consequently enriches the latter. As soon as the motor has reached a temperature condition at which the carburetor mixture alone is cfiicient, the knob 2O is released and the spring l7 returns the parts to 'the position shown-in F 2, in which position it will be noted the head 33, by reason of its swiveljoint nconnection to the plunger-head enabling it to automatically seat itself squarely on the inner face of the cylinder head, effectively seals the yports 42, 43, sothat there is no leakage through thedevice, which leakage is a common fault of the ordinary primers.

The spring 17 is compressed on the outward or suction stroke, and its reaction aids the inward or forcing stroke, making the latter promptand easy of performance. In fact, the knob or handle may be released at the end of each outward stroke, if desired, and the spring 17 relied upon to alone effect the compressing and'forcing stroke as well as the sealing of the line `against leakage.

ln a companion application tiled 'concurrently herewith, Serial No. 549,942, l have .disclosed and claimed an iniproved lvaporizing and spraying device lwhich may advantageously be vapplied to the delivery end of the discharge pipe 57 within the manifold; but such device is not necessaryso far as the functioning of the present device `concerned, and hence l `have not illust ated the same herein.

yl claiml. In an auxiliary charge forming device ofthe character described., the combination of a. pump, a suction line connecting said pump to a source of liquid fuel supply, means external to said pump for establishing the charge of fuel induced by the ,suction stroke of said pump at a' predetermined measured amount, means for admitting air to the cylinder of said pump in the presence of the fuel, and a valve-controlled discharge Vline from said pump.

rfi

2. ln an auxiliary charge forming device of the character described, the combination of a pump, a suction line connecting said pump to a. source'of liquid fuel supply, a fuel measuring device associated with said suction line and operating to limit the amount of fuel passed to said pump on each suction stroke of the latter, means for admitting a predetermined measured amount of air to the cylinder of said pump in the presence of the fuel, and a valve-controlled discharge line from said pump.

3. ln an auxiliary charge forming device of the character described, the combination cf a pump, a suction line connecting` said 'pump to a source of liquid fuel supply, a.

fuel `measuring device in and forming a part of said suction line and functioning to pass uniform and equal amounts of fuel to said pump on the suction strokes of the latter, means for admitting air at .atn'iospheric pressure to the cylinder of said pump in the presence of the fuel, and afvalve-ccntrolled discharge line from said pump.

4i. ln an auxiliary charge forming device of the character described, the combination of a manually operable pump adapted to be mounted on the dash of an automobile, a

` ting a measured volume of atmospheric air to the cylinder thereof after the` gasoline charge has been induced therein, anda valvecontrolled discharge line from said pump.

5. A manually operable dash pump for supplying an explosive mixture to a gas engine manifold, comprising a cylinder having one head thereof communicating with a gasoline intalre line and with a discharge line, a chambered piston having a hollow rod extending through the other cylinder head and ported to atmosphere, and a Chechvalve controlling the flow or air through said hollow rod and chambered piston.

6. A manually operable dash pump for supplying an explosive mixture to a gas engine manifold, comprising a cylinder having one head thereof communicating with a gasoline. intake line and vwith a discharge line, a chambered piston having a hollow rod extending through the other cylinder head and ported to atmosphere, and a spring-pressed check-valve mounted in the chamber of said piston and seating on the inner end of said hollow piston rod.

7. A manually operable. -dash pump for supplying an explosive mixture to a gas engine manifold, comprising a cylinder having ports in one head thereof communicating with a gasoline supply line and a discharge line respectively, a piston, a piston rod extending through the other cylinder head, means for admitting air to said cylinder on the suction stroke of said piston, and a spring acting to force the front face of said piston into covering engagement with the supply and discharge ports of said cylinder head.

8. A manually operable dash pump for supplying an explosive mixture to a gas engine manifold, comprising a cylinder having one head thereof communicating with a gasoline intake line and with a discharge line, a chambered piston having a hollow rod slidably mounted in the other cylinder head, said rod having` a lateral intake port for air located inwardly ofits outer end, an operating handle on the outer end of said hollow rod, and a sleeve-valve for said port surrounding said hollow rod inwardly of said other cylinder head.

9. A manually operable dash pump for supplying an explosive mixture to a gas engine manifold, comprising a cylinder naving ports in one head thereof communicating with a gasoline supply line and a discharge line respectively, a piston rod extending through the other cylinder head, means of said piston on the suction stroke ofthe latter, a valve head swveled on the face of y said piston and of less diameter than the internal diameter of said cylinder, and a spring acting on said piston to force said valve head into closing engagement with the supply and discharge ports of said cylinder head.

10. A manually operable dash pump for supplying an explosive mixture to a gas engine manifold, comprising a cylinder having ports in one head thereof communicating with a gasoline supply line and a discharge line respectively, a chambered piston having a gas-tight sliding lit in said cylinder, a hollow piston rod extending through the other cylinder head and formed` with a lateral intake port for air located inwardly of its outer end, an operating handleon the outer end of said hollou7 rod, a sleeve valve for said air port surrounding said hollow rod inwardly of said other cylinder head, a check-valve in the chamber of said piston, a valve head swiveled on the face of said piston and of less diameter than the internal diameter of said cylinder, and a compression spring in said cylinder behind said piston acting on the latter to force said valve head into closing engagement with the supply and discharge ports of said cylinder head. Y

ll. ln an auxiliary charge forming device of the character described, the combination with a suction pump, of a gasoline supply line connected to said pump, said supply line including a measuring device oprating to pass a uniform predetermined volume of gasoline to the pump on each suction stroke of the latter, regardless of the height of lift of the gasoline.

l2. In an auxiliary charge forming device Vof the character described, the combination with a suction pump, of a gasoline supply line connected to said pump, said supply line including a `measuring chamber having a valve seat at the end thereof nearest said pump, and a valve in said chamber drawn to said seat on each suction stroke of said pump.

13. In an auxiliary charge forming device of the character described, the combination with a suction pump, of a gasoline supply line connected to said pump, said supply line including a vertical measuring chamber having a check valve at its lower end and a valve seat at its upper end, and a valve in said chamber of slightly greater specific gravity than gasoline and drawn upwardly by the latter into engagement with said upper valve seat on each suction stroke of said pump.

le. In an auxiliary carbureting device of the character described, the combination with a dash pump having means for admitting a measured volume of air on its suction stroke, of a discharge line leading therefrom to the intake manifold of a gas engine, a gasoline supply line connected to said pump, means in said supply line permitting a limited continuous flow of gasoline through the latter, said pump, and discharge line to the intake manifold, under the suction'of the latter and means incorporated in said pump through which the connection between the supply and discharge lines through the pump is normally cut off.

l5. In an auxiliary carbureting device of the character described, the combination with a dash pump having an air inlet port adapted to be opened during the suction stroke of said pump to admit a. measured volume of air to the latter, of a discharge line leading from said pump to the intake manifold Of a gas engine, a gasoline supply line connected to said pump, a valve in said supply line permitting a limited continuous flow of gasoline through the latter, said pump, and discharge line to the intake manifold under the suction of the latter', and means incorporated in said pump through which the connection between the supply discharge lines through the pump is normally cut off.

16. In an auxiliary charge forming device of the character described, the combination with a dash pump having means for admitting a measured volume of air on its suction stroke, of a discharge line leading therefrom to the intake manifold of a gas engine, a gasoline supply line connected to said pump, said supply line including a gasoline measuring chamber, and a valve in said chamber measuring the volume of gasoline flowing therethrough on each suction stroke of said pump, said valve having a bleed duct permitting a limited continuous flow of gasoline through said measuring chamber, supply line, pump, and discharge line to the intake manifold under the suction of the latter, and means incorporated in said pump through which the ,connection between the supply and discharge lines through the pump is normally ycut off.

17. The method of priming an internal combustion engine with an explosive mixture, which consists in successively bringing together in a confined space or chamber me chanically measured amounts of a volatile liquid fuel and ratmospheric air, and then forcing the connningled fuel and air into the intake of the engine.

18. The method of priming an .internal combustion engine with an explosive mix ture, which consists in successively inducing by suction into a confined space or chamber mechanically measured amounts of a volatile liquid fuel and atmospheric air, and then forcing the commingled fuel and air into the intake of the engine.

IRVING COWLES.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4375206 *Mar 27, 1980Mar 1, 1983Outboard Marine CorporationFuel primer and enrichment system for an internal combustion engine
US4508068 *Jun 9, 1983Apr 2, 1985Emerson Electric Co.Fuel mixture enrichment system for internal combustion engine
Classifications
U.S. Classification123/179.11
International ClassificationF02N99/00
Cooperative ClassificationF02N99/008
European ClassificationF02N99/00C6