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Publication numberUS1574004 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 23, 1926
Filing dateNov 29, 1922
Priority dateNov 29, 1922
Publication numberUS 1574004 A, US 1574004A, US-A-1574004, US1574004 A, US1574004A
InventorsRyder Henry
Original AssigneeWire Fibrous Products Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Multiple-wire fibrous yarn
US 1574004 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. 23 1926.

H. RYDER MULTIPLE WIRE FIBROUS YARN Filed Nov. 29. 1922 A TTORNE Y "Patented Feb. 23, 1926.

UNITED STATE-S' 1,574,004 PATENT OFFICE.

HENRY RYDER, NEW YORK, N. Y., ASSIGNOR T0 WIRE FIBRO'OS PRODUCTS COM- I IPANY, OF NEW YORK, N. Y., A. CORPORATION OF NEW JERSEY.

' MULTIPLEWIRE FIBROUS YARN.

Application filed November 29, 1922. Serial No. 603,993.

To all whom it may concern:

e it known that I, HENRY RYDER, a citize of the United States, residing at No. 37 West 46th Street, New York, in the county of New York, State of New York, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Multiple-WVire Fibrous Yarns and I do hereby declare the following to be a full, clear, and exact description of the invention, such as will enable others skilled in the art to which it appertains to make and use the same.

This invention relates to a multiple wire fibrous 'yarn or rope structure and to the method of making the same. The multiple yarn which forms the subject matter of this application comprises a combination of wires and fibres arranged in such a manner that the wires and fibres may each carry a part of the load which may be applied to the yarn as a'whole. The im roved arn consists of a core and a plurality of fi res spun around the core in such a manner that the fibres lie parallel with each other spirally around'the core. The core consists of a plurality of single wire fibrous yarns of the type disclosed in my prior Patent No. 831,108. These sin le yarns, forming the core, lie parallel wlth each other, and the multiple yarn is made in such a manner that there is no torsion or twist in the several single yarns forming the core.

-It is an established fact that if a wire or yarn ofany description is rasped firmly and unwound from a spool y pulling the wire or yarn straight away from the spool the wire or yarn is subjected to considerable torsion. The direction of this torsion depends upon whether the Wire or yarn is taken. from the underside of the spool 01 from the top.

In order to relieve the wire or yarn from this torsion, it is necessary to either turn the spool from which the wire or yarn is taken, or to turn the wire itself. In'either case this turning'should be in such a di rection that it tends to take the torsion or twist out of the wire or yarn.

Accordingly, one of the principal objects of this invention is to provide a method whereby yarns may be fed from a plurality of spools in such a manner that this torsion which normall develops when the yarn is drawn from t e spool, is completely neutralized or eliminated. This is accomplished by rotating the spools about the' transverse axesin such directions that t e torsion or twist is taken out of the yarns which are being drawn or pulled off of the spools.

, The improved multiple wire fibrous yarn may be made by means of the spinning machine, disclosed in my copending application, Serial No. 603,992, filed Nov. 29, 1922.

The present invention may be best understood by referring to the following detailed description which is to be considered in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, in which:

Fig. 1 is an elevation showing a piece of single wire fibrous yarn as disclosed in my prior Patent No. 831,108;

Fig. 2 is a transverse section of the yarn shown inFig. 1;

Fig. 3 is an elevation of a iece of multiple wire fibrous yarn showmg the construction thereof;

Fig. 4 is a transverse section of the yarn shown in Fig. 3.

My improved multiple yarn or rope structure can be made by means of the spinning machine disclosed in my copending application above mentioned. In this machine the spool holder rotates in the same direction and with the same speed that the fiyer rotates. The yarns passing from the several spools are brought together to form a substantially compact core which passes along above a conveyor. Fibers are s un around this core so that they lie parailel to each other spirally around the core in the form of a homogeneous layer. In order to prevent torsion from being developed in the yarns as they are being drawn off from the spools,'each of the spools is rotated about a Y transverse axis in the direction opposite to that in which the spool holder rotates.

From the above description it should be apparent that the method of making multiple wirefibrous yarn comprises, in general, supplying a plurality of single wire fibrous yarns to the nipper of the spinning machine in such a manner that they lie parallel to each other, and also so that there is no torsion or twist in the individual single yarns, and then spinning fibres around this core of single yarns in such a manner that the fibres lie parallel to each other spirally around the core. The finished product comprises multiple wire fibrous yarn in which the wires and fibres may carry an equal stress under load. The wires and fibres, are combined in such amanner that there is no torsion. or initial stress 1n the single yarns forming the core. The

fibres around the wires serve to cushionthem and thus to prevent them from chafing against each other and gradually wearing out. Furthermore, the improved yarn is very durable due to the fact that the strain ordinarily taken by the fibre of a 'of'single wire fibrous yarns and fibres. In this event the wires would be simply substituted in place of the single wire fibrous yarns and supplied to the nipper parallel to each other and inan untwisted condition.

, I prefer, however, to make the multiple wire fibrous yarn by using single wire fibrous yarns for the core, for the reasons stated above.

I claim: A

1. A rope structure, comprising a core of yarns-in parallel relation, and a covering of fibres spun above said core.. 2. A rope structure, comprising a core of yarns in parallel relation and in a substantially untwisted condition, and a plurality of fibres enclosing said core in the form of a homogeneous layer.

3. A rope structure, comprising a core of yarns in parallel relation and in a substantially untwisted condition and a lurality ot' fibres enclosing said core, said fibres lying parallel to each other spirally around said vcore in the form of a homogeneous layer.

4. A rope structure, comprising a core of yarns in parallel relation, and a covermg of 'untwisted fibresspun about said core, each of said yarns having a wire core. I In testimony whereof I aflix my signature.

HENRY RYDER;

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3234723 *May 20, 1963Feb 15, 1966Kenard D BrownElongated tension load carrying element for oil wells and the like
US4262480 *Mar 1, 1979Apr 21, 1981Frederick A. LowensteinNovelty yarn and method and apparatus of making same
US4300321 *Mar 3, 1980Nov 17, 1981Bayer AktiengesellschaftComposite fibre material articles with inlays and a method of producing them
US4777789 *Oct 3, 1986Oct 18, 1988Kolmes Nathaniel HWire wrapped yarn for protective garments
US4838017 *Jun 6, 1988Jun 13, 1989Kolmes Nathaniel HWire wrapped yarn for protective garments
US5655358 *May 8, 1995Aug 12, 1997Kolmes; Nathaniel H.Cut resistant support yarn suitable for wrapping with an additional yarn covering
US5806295 *May 23, 1997Sep 15, 1998Robins; Steven D.Protective apparel, multiple core cut-resistant yarn, and method of constructing a multiple core cut-resistant yarn
US6363703Jun 1, 2000Apr 2, 2002Supreme Elastic CorporationWire wrapped composite yarn
US6467251Nov 22, 2000Oct 22, 2002Supreme Elastic CorporationLightweight composite yarn
US6779330Oct 31, 2000Aug 24, 2004World Fibers, Inc.Antimicrobial cut-resistant composite yarn and garments knitted or woven therefrom
US7121077Apr 5, 2004Oct 17, 2006World Fibers, Inc.Antimicrobial cut-resistant composite yarn and garments knitted or woven therefrom
US20040187471 *Apr 5, 2004Sep 30, 2004World Fibers, Inc.Antimicrobial cut-resistant composite yarn and garments knitted or woven therefrom
US20070084182 *Oct 17, 2006Apr 19, 2007World Fibers, Inc.Antimicrobial cut-resistant composite yarn and garments knitted or woven therefrom
USRE38136 *Aug 12, 1999Jun 10, 2003Supreme Elastic CorporationCut resistant support yarn suitable for wrapping with an additional yarn covering
Classifications
U.S. Classification57/210, 57/224
International ClassificationD07B1/00
Cooperative ClassificationD07B2201/1092, D07B1/005, D07B1/04
European ClassificationD07B1/04, D07B1/00B