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Publication numberUS1577159 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 16, 1926
Filing dateJul 17, 1925
Priority dateJul 17, 1925
Publication numberUS 1577159 A, US 1577159A, US-A-1577159, US1577159 A, US1577159A
InventorsBarrett Harold G
Original AssigneeBarbarite Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Metallic reenforcing core for golf-club shafts and the like, and method of making the same
US 1577159 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 16 1926.

METALLTC REENFORCING CORE FOR GOLF CLUB SHAFTS AND THE LIKE AND METHOD OF MAKLNG THE SAME Filed July 17 1925 H. G. BARRETT Patented Mar. 16, 1926 UNITED STATES HAROLD G.

PATENT OFFICE.

BARRETT, OF WILMIETTE, ILLINOIS ASSIGNOR T0 BARBARITE CORPORA- 'IION, OF CHICAGO, ILLINOIS, A CORPORATION OF ILLINOIS.

METALLIC REENFORCING- CORE FOR GOLF-CLUB SHAFTS AND THE LIKE, AND METHOD OF MAKING THE SAME.

Application filed July 17, 1925. Serial No. 44,225.

To all whom it may concern:

Be it known that I, HAROLD G. BAnnn'rr, a citizen of the United States, residing at /vilmette, in the county of Cook and State of Illinois, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Metallic Reenforcing Cores for Golf-Club Shafts and the like, and Methods of Making the Same, of which the following is a specification.

This invention relates to improvements in shafts for golf clubs and the like, but more specifically the invention relates to an improved metallic core for re-enforcing wooden shafts of this character, thereby enabling the use of low grade wood in the manufacture of the shaft.

A further objectr is to provide an improved re-enforced wooden shaft for golf clubs and the like which will combine all of the attributes of metal and the usual wooden shafts, and at thesame time elimi nate the disadvantages of both.

To the attainment of these ends and the accomplishment of other new and useful objects as will appear, the invention consists in the features of novelty in substantially the construction, combination and arrangement of the several parts hereinafter more fully described and claimed andshown in the accompanying drawing illustrating this invention, and in which Figure 1 is a side elevation of a golf club having a shaft constructed in accordance with the principles of this invention applied thereto.

Figure 2 is a detail cross sectional view of two of the wooden members from which the shaft is constructed.

Figure 3 is a view similar to Fi ure 2, showing the wooden members assem led.

Figure 4 is a View similar to Figure 3 showing the channel reamed out for the reception of the core.

Figure 5 is a*pcrspective view of the metallic core.

Figure 6 is a cross sectional view of the metallic core.

Figure 7 is a cross sectional view of the wooden members of the shaft with the metallic re-enforcing core in position'therewood or the like, and each of the pieces isprovided with a longitudinal channel 16 opening through one face thereof. These members 15 are adapted to be placed together so that the channel in each registers with the channel in the other to form an opening extending lengthwise of the shaft to be formed.

The members 15 are secured together in any suitable manner such as by means of glue or cement.

After the parts have been assembled as shown in Figure 3 the opening formed by the channels 16 is reamed out. from one end of the members 15 as at 17, to form a tapermg opening.

A metallic re-enforcing core designated generally by the reference numeral 18 is provided and is constructed of any suitable material preferably tempered metal, and of any suitable gage or thickness, having some inherent resiliency. 1

The core 18 is split longitudinally as at 19 for the entire length of the core and the edges of the split portion are turned in wardly as at 20 to form inwardly projecting flanges, and the natural resiliency of the core 18 is such that the flanges 20 will, when the core is not inserted in the shaft,

separate the flanges 20.

The core 18 is preferably tapered and is adapted to be inserted into the shaft or the members 15 from which the shaft is formed, by passing into one end of the channel 16,

lid

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Mmlll and the core is driven into the channel during; which time the core is gradually contracted until'iit is fully seated, at which time the adjacent faces of the. flanges 20 will ahut each other as shown in Figure 7'.

The natural resiliency of the core 18 will hold the same firmly against the Wall of the channel and the flanges 20 abutting each other will prevent the core fron'i collapsing While being driven into the shaft."

After the core has been thus seated the members 15 are then shaped to form the shaft. by turning down the member 15 to the desired diameter.

The core is preferably anchored adjacent its ends to the shaft 15 so that the shaft Will have the desired torque and at the same time possess the desired resiliency and llenibility.

ilrny suitable means may he provided for thus anchoring; the core and shaft such as a fastening screw orbolt ill which passes through the shaft and the core and preferahly has threaded ettreniity Elli which is threaded into a portion of the shaft.

llsimilar fastening; device i jil may he provided adjacent the other end of the shaft for securing that end of the shalt and core together While the internicdia i ortion of the ehaft and core between. tl thing; devices 521 and are detached our each other so as to permit of a slight relative movement between the shaft and the core thereby rein during it possihle to uroduce the necessary toraue in the shaft ithout causing" the shaft to hi alt and at the same time the shaft. will possess the neon stillness and rigidity as Well tensile 'lhe flat a fill may he o throughout m he l he of incrcasii. shaft to the other so that in the same amount he provided at o: is at the other lin. the form.

' l0 and a L l in t cause it to hind upon the Wall of the opening in the shaft in which the core is located.

llith this improved construction it Will also he manifest that a shaft for golf clubs and the like may be produced from Wood of low grade and quality, and While the shaftis shown as being constructed of two sec tions it is obvious that any number of sections may he provided.

l l hile the preferred forms of the invention have been herein shown and described it is to he understood that 'arious changes may be made in the details of construction and in the combination and arrangement of the several parts, Within the scope of the claims, "Without departing from the spirit of this invention.

ll hat is claimed as. new is 1.. ll. shaft; for golf clubs and the like com-- prising plurality of wooden strips secured together and a hollow longitudinally split metallic core contracted and surrounded lay the said strips.

ll. shaft for golf eluhs and the like con'iprising a plurality of Wooden strips cured together, and a. hollow longitudinally split metallic core contracted and euriaiuuded by the said strips, the edges of the aplit portion of the core abutting each other.

ll. shaft for y l cluhs and the like comprising a plurality of wooden strips secured to rethcr a hollow longitudinally split metallic 0t. e contracted and surrounded lay the said strips, and llanges along; the edges of the split portion of the core, the said llangcs abutting each other when the core is contracted.

i shaft for ell? clubs and the like coniprlsiiug; a plurality of Wooden stri isse cured together, a hollow lo itudinally split metallic core contra d urrounded hy the said strips, the t i of the split you tion of the core abu and means adiachill; the ends of the core for securing the a nlura ii tag r and lll inc

' rte flanges on adjacent edges of the core sections abutting.

8. A shaft for golf clubs and the like comprising a plurality of wooden strips secured together, a longitudinally split hollow metallic core closely surrounded and housed by the said strips, laterally projecting flanges along the longitudinal edges of the split portion ofthe core, the proximate flanges on adjacent edges of the core, sections abutting, and means securing the ends of the core and the'shaft together, the portions of the core and shaft intermediate the said securing means being free for slight relative rotary movement.

9. A shaft for golf clubs and the like embodying a plurality of wooden strips sesured together, and a split resilient metallic core contracted and surrounded by said strips, the longitudinal edges of the core abutting, the inherent resiliency of the core tending normally to separate the said edges. 10. A shaft for golf clubs and the like embodying a plurality of wooden strips secured together, a split resilient hollow metallic cor-e contracted and surrounded by said strips, and flanges along the edges of the split portion of the core, the inherent reslliency of the core tending to separate the said flanges, the said strips surrounding and contracting the said core to cause the said flanges to abut.

11. A shaft for golf clubs and the like 0111- means adjacent the ends only of the core for fastening the core and strips against relative rotary movement.

19. A shaft for golf clubs and the like emhodying a plurality of wooden strips secured together. a split resilient hollow metallic core contracted and surrounded by said strips, flanges along the edges of the split portion of the core, the inherent resiliency of the core tending to separate the said flanges, the I ly split metallic core to cause the ed es of the core to abut, and then shaping t e exterior of the shaft.

14. The method ofconstructing shafts for golf clubs and the like which consists in pro viding a non-metallic hollow shaft, then forcing into the shaft a hollow longitudinally split resilient metallic core to contract the core and cause the longitudinal edges of the split portion of the core to abut, and then shaping the exterior of the shaft.

15. The method of constructing shafts for golf clubs and the like which consists in providing a plurality of strips of wood, then longitudinally grooving the strips, then securing the strips together to form a hollow wood shaft, then forcing into the shaft from the end thereof a hollow longitudinally split ,metallic core to cause the longitudinal edges of the split portion of thecore to abut and remain in abutment, and then shaping the exterior of the shaft.

16. The method of constructing shafts for golf clubs and the like which consists in providing a plurality of strips of wood, then longitudinally grooving the strips, then securing the strips together to form a hollow wood shaft, then forcing into the shaft from the end thereof a hollow longitudinally'split resilient metallic core to contract the core and cause the longitudinal edges of the split portion of the core to abut and remain in abutment, andthen shaping the exterior of the shaft.

In testimony whereof I have signed my name 'to this specification, on this 10th day of July, A. D. 1925.

HAROLD G. BARRETT.

forcing into the shaft a hollow longitudinal-

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4591157 *Sep 4, 1984May 27, 1986Callaway Hickory Stick-Usa, Inc.Golf club shaft
Classifications
U.S. Classification473/321, 473/322
International ClassificationA63B53/10
Cooperative ClassificationA63B53/10, A63B2209/00, A63B59/0014
European ClassificationA63B53/10