Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS1582225 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 27, 1926
Filing dateJul 13, 1925
Priority dateJul 13, 1925
Publication numberUS 1582225 A, US 1582225A, US-A-1582225, US1582225 A, US1582225A
InventorsRoss Pulkinghorn William
Original AssigneeRoss Pulkinghorn William
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Device for impregnating flowing water
US 1582225 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April 27 1926. 1,582,225

W. R. PULKINGHORN DEVICE FOR IMPREGNATING FLOWING WATER Filed July 15 192,5

, INVENTOR. WILLIAM R-PULK/NWORN I I BY 2 l3 1, 28 E V ATTORNEY.

Paema'a r. 27, 1926.

WILLIAM BOSS PULKINGHOBNT, 0F LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA.

DEVICE FOR IMPREGNATING FLOWIN G WATER.

Application filed July 13, 1925. Serial No. 43,414.

To all whom it may concern:

Be it known that I, WILLIAM ltoss PULKINGI-tORN, a citizen of the United States, residing at Los Angeles, in the county of Los Angeles and State of California, have invented a new and useful Device for Impregnating Flowing 'Water, of which the following is a specification.

Thisinvention relates more specifically to a device designed to be used in connect on with shower, spray and bath fixtures to 1mpregnate the water flowing therethrough with various granular soluble or liquid chemicals.

A main object of the invention is to provide a simple device formed of a sanitary material, such as glass or porcelain that may be conveniently mounted in a shower, spray, or bath room fixture for deliveringwhen desired to. the water flowing therethrough soluble chemical salts or liquids in order to soften, perfume, or otherwise chemlcalize the flowing water.

Another object is to provide a device in which the soluble salts may be introduced to the flowing water when required, and to provide a convenient removable means for holding the chemical salts within. the device.

A further object is to provide suitable means connected to the device for efiiciently mixing the chemical salts with the water as it flows therethrough.

Briefly the invention consists of a small cylindrical casing formed of glass, porcelain or other sanitary material, having a water inlet leading thereto and an oppositely disposed water outlet leading therefrom at the base thereof. The open top of the casing is provided with a detachable metal closure, carrying a downwardly extending metal sleeve in which is mounted a vertically reciprocable shaft, means being provided on the upper end of the sleeve for manually reciprocating thev shaft when desired; the shaft is also provided therearound with a suitable packing to form a water tight joint. Secured to the lower end of the shaft is a circular arm extending at right angles thereto carrying on its upper face a circular valve, an impeller wheel for -mixing the chemicals being rotatably secured to the under face of the circular arm. The sleeve secured to the closure cap is provided with a pair of spring arms for supporting in posi- View taken on the line 6-6 of Fig. 2 looking tion a glass container carrying the chemical salts or liquids in the form of a test tube, its upper closed end bearing against the under surface of the metal closure cap and the longitudinal axis of the container being in alinement with the vertical axis of the circular arm, whereby when the shaft is re ciproeated-upwardly the valve'on the cirthe outer end thereof, or other forms of nozzles intended for various uses. In the drawings attached hereto and formmg a part of the following specification,

Fig. 1. is a side elevation of the device detachably mounted on a wall bracket and connected for use.

Fig. 2 is a central vertical section through the device showing the valve in an open positlon. Fig. 3 is a partial central section of the lower end of the device showing the valve in a closed position.

Fig. 4. is a transverse section of the device taken on line 44 of Fig. 2 looking in the direction indicated by the arrows thereon.

Fig. 5 is a transverse section of the device taken on line 5-5 of Fig. 2 and looking in the direction the arrows indicate thereon.

Fig. 6 is an enlarged detailed sectional in the direction shown by the arrows.

Referring more particularly to the drawings, 10 indicates acylindrical casing open at the upper end and preferably formed of heavy glass, porcelain or other sanitary material. Formed in the circular wall of the casing and adjacent the bottom thereof is a water inlet opening 11 externally threaded for the reception of a rubber tubing 12, whose free end is adapted to be secured to a water supply fixture of any approved type. Disposed diametrically opposite water inlet 10 is an' outlet 13 of the same general form as the inlet, being externally threaded on its outer end for the reception of a rubber hose 14 carrying-a spray or other discharge type of nozzle 15 on the free end thereof as clearly shown in Fig. 1. v

Detachably secured to the upper open end of the casing 10 is a metal closure cap 16 car- 119 rying adjacent its circular edge a downwardly extending metal sleeve 17. The lower end of sleeve 17 is of rectangular formation as at 18, and the upper end that projects above the closure cap 16 is threaded for the re ception of a shaft adjusting nut 19. Mounted in sleeve 17 is a reciprocable shaft 20, the upper end thereof being swivelly secured to the operating adjusting nut 19, the lower end of the shaft 21 being of rectangular formation and fitting loosely within the rectangularportion 18 of the sleeve, whereby the shaft 20 is prevented from rotating when adjusted vertically within the sleeve. In order to form a water tight joint between the shaft 20 and the interior of the sleeve 17 a tubular packing 22 is provided, it being understood that other forms of packing may be utilized if desired. 1

Rigidly secured on the lower end of shaft 20 is a circular arm 25 that projects at right angles therefrom and carries on its upper face a valve. 26 formed of rubber or other pliable material. Secured to sleeve 17 above its rectangular end 18 are spring fingers 27 adapted to support in position in the casing a removable glass container tube 28 closed at its upper end. This container tube is designed to carry the salts or chemicals for ohemicalizing the water passing throu 11 the device as W111 be more clearly exp ained further on.

Rotatably mounted on the underface of arm 25 is an impeller wheel 29 for the purpose of mixing the chemicals that fall from the container 28 into the path of fluid flow through the device. At the inner end of the outlet opening is formed a circular seat 31 for the reception of a flanged screen, designed to prevent the passage therethrough of any undissolved chemicals on an operation of the device.

In order that the water passing through the inlet opening may rotate the impeller wheel 29, a deflecting lip 33 is formed at one side of the inner end of said opening as clearly shown in Fig. 5 of the drawing. By means of this deflector lip the water entering the device will be deflected tangentially with respect to the cylindrical casing to rapidly rotate the impeller wheel, and thus mix the chemicals falling from the container 28 when the valve is opened.

The operation of the device will-be a parent from the following description. T e device when used in connection with a spray nozzle (as illustrated in Fig. 1 of the drawings) is detachably mounted on a support 35, secured to the wall 36 adjacent the source of water supply. This su port pref erably consists of a standard 3? having a pair of sprin arms 38 extending from its outer face midway its upper and lower ends, adapted to engage the cylindrical wall of the casing 10, the lower portion of the support being provided with hook seats 39 that engage the inlet and outlet nipples of the casing.

When it is desired to use the device in connection with a shower bath, the closure cap together with its attached mechanism is first removed'from the casing and a filled container tube mounted in the spring arms 27, the valve 26 bein rotated to a closed position. The plumbing fixture may now be operated to supply water for the bath, and when the same is completed the valve is unseated to release the contents of the container tube into the flowing water to impregnate the same for a final rinsing operation. As the salts fall from the container into the path of the flowing water the impeller wheel will thoroughly co-mingle the same therewith, such salts employed for this purpose being highly soluble. Should chemicals in the form of crystals be employed in the device that are not as readily soluble, the rapidly revolving impeller wheel will greatly assist in their rapid absorption.

In the drawings although I have illustrated my device in connection with a shower spray tube, it will be readily understood that it may be'just as effectively used in connection w1thother apparatus such as nasal douche, fountain syringes, or similar devices with equal facility. Further the device may be combined in connection with tub, shower or kitchen sink fixtures.

The chemical container tubes 28 may be formed of a comparatively inexpensive material, such asblown glass, and the filled containers maybe charged with chemicals of various kinds and vended in cartons of a dozen or halfdozen lots at-small cost. In the case of perfumed bath salts this method of using the same will effect economies in their use, as the tubes will not contain more than the exact uantity of salts necessary to efiiciently per ume the bath.

What I claim is:

1. A device of the class described comprismg a casing having an open upper end and provided in its lower portion with water inlet and outlet openings, a closure for the upper end of said casing, a container having an open lower end removably supported by said casing closure, and a. valve secured to said casing closure for closing the open end of said container and operating means therefor.

2. A device of the class described comprising a cylindrical casing open at its upper end and provided with fluid inlet and outlet openings, a closure for the upper end of said casing, a sleeve secured to said closure extending downwardly therefrom its upper end projecting above said closure, a shaft mounted to reciprocate in said sleeve and means to operate the same, a fluid impregnating material container detachably secured to said sleeve having an open lower end, and a valve secured to said shaft for Controlling the opening and closing of said container.

3. A device of the class described comprising a verticallyidisposed cylindrical casing provided at the bottom thereof with fluid inlet and outlet openings, a container having a discharge port for confining a water impregnating material, means for supporting said container within said casing above the fluid inlet and outlet openings, a valve for controlling the port of said container, an impeller wheel mount-ed on said valve and adapted to be actuated by the fluid passing through said casing, and means to operate the valve to open or close the port in said container.

4. A device of the class described con1- prising a cylindrical casing open at its upper end and provided with fluid inlet and outlet openings, a closure for the upper end of said casing, a sleeve secured to said closure extending downwardly therefrom its upper end projecting above said closure, a shaft mounted to. reciprocate in said sleeve and means to operate the same, a fluid impregnating material container detachably secured to said sleeve having an open lower end, a valve secured to said shaft for controlling the opening and closing of said container, and an impeller wheel rotatably secured to the under face of the valve and operated by the fluid passing through said container, whereby to mix the fluid impregnating material with the fluid on its passage through the casing.

5. A device of the class described comprising a vertically disposed cylindrical casing provided at the bottom thereof with fluid inlet and outlet openings, a container having a discharge port for confining a water impregnating material, means for supporting said container within said casing above the fluid inlet and outlet openings, a valve for controlling the port of said container, an impeller wheel mounted on said valve and adapted to be actuated by the fluid passing through said casing, the inner end of the fluid inlet opening being provided with a fluid deflecting means, whereby to actuate the impeller wheel, and means to operate the valve to open or close the port in said container.

In witness that I claim the foregoing I have hereunto subscribed my name this 30thday of June 1925.

WVILLIAM ROSS PULKINGHORN.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2537716 *Jul 21, 1948Jan 9, 1951Seichi TerauchiSoap dissolver and mixer
US2584104 *Sep 3, 1948Feb 5, 1952Aske Irving ESolution mixer and distributor
US2713834 *May 25, 1954Jul 26, 1955Shirley Guy WSub-irrigation and fertilizing device
US3382887 *Oct 3, 1966May 14, 1968Dole Valve CoPhotocopier valve
US4315601 *Aug 4, 1980Feb 16, 1982Brooker Steven AChemical injector
US6056209 *Mar 6, 1997May 2, 2000Rivera; Jose E.Chemical-free solution treatment process
US6264119 *May 24, 1999Jul 24, 2001International Business Technology CorporationWater filter spray nozzle cleaning system
US6843432 *Nov 17, 2000Jan 18, 2005Robert L. PhilpottPersonal hygiene cleansing apparatus
EP2813626A1 *Jun 13, 2014Dec 17, 2014Garcia Antonio MartinBath salt dispensing device for showers
Classifications
U.S. Classification422/266, 422/269, 239/310, 137/550, 239/142, 137/268, 137/605
International ClassificationE03C1/046, E03C1/04
Cooperative ClassificationE03C1/046
European ClassificationE03C1/046