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Publication numberUS1582883 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 27, 1926
Filing dateJun 8, 1925
Priority dateJun 8, 1925
Publication numberUS 1582883 A, US 1582883A, US-A-1582883, US1582883 A, US1582883A
InventorsGeorge R Rich
Original AssigneeGeorge R Rich
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Valve tappet and like article
US 1582883 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April 27 1926.'

- 1,582,883 a. RICH VALVE TAP'PET AND LIKE ARTICLE Filed June a, 1925 Patented Apr. 27, 1926c chosen n. men,- or BATTLE canes, urcnrean.

vanvnrarrnr also LIKE enuresis.

Application filed June 8, 1925. Serial lie. 35,548. I

To all whom itmag concern:

Be it known that I, GEORGE E. Bron, a citizen of the United States, and a resident of Battle Creek, Calhoun County, and State of Michigan, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Valve Tappets and like Articles, of which the following is declared to be a full, clear, and exact description.

This invention relates to valve tappets and like articles of manufacture for use 'in internal combustion engines, and its prim cipal object is to provide a twopiece article having a disc like head and a hollow stem united in a novel manner by'a forging process. .Another object is to provide a headed, hollow stem article, of which the stem may be formed of one forgeable metal and the head of the same at a different forgeable metal. Among the advantages of a hollow stem or thin shell stem valve tappet are the lightness in weight, thesaving of power and the economy in the use of gasoline or other explosive mixtures used in internal combus-' 25 tion engines. Another object is to provide a more effective union between the head and hollow stem of valve tappetsor other headed articles of manufacture, whereby the possibility of separation between the two under hard usage, is entirely eliminated.

With these ends: in view, this invention consists in a headed article of manufacture having a hollow stem, united therewith by a forging process in which the end of'the hollow stem is spread outward and laterally into the head portion during the forging process. It further consists in a headed article of manufacture having a hollow stem, the end portion of which is spread outward and laterally into the head portion, during the forging process, and a part below the flared portion is forced inward into the interior of the hollow stem portion and into intimate contact with that side of the head adjacent the stem. The invention further consists in the several novel features hereinafter fully set forth and claimed.

The invention is clearly illustrated in the drawings accompanying this invention, in which Fig. l is a side elevation of a valve tappe't illustrating one embodiment of the present invention; Fig.- 2 is a central longitudinal section therethrough; Fig. 3 is a side elevation-of the two assembled pieces from, which the tappet is constructed; Fig. 4 is a cross section taken'on the line H of Fig. 2;

'Fig. 5 is a central longitudinal section through fragments of forming dies, employed in the process of formingup the tappet, the two pieces from which the tappet is formed, being also shown in central, longitudinal section; Fig. 6 is an end view of the piece, from which the head is formed, the view being taken in the direction indicated by the arrow 6 in Fig. 3, and Fig. 7 is an end view of the piece from which the stem is formed, the view being taken in the direction indicated by the arrow 7 in Fig. 3.

, Referring to said-drawing, which illustrates one embodiment of the present invention applied to a valve tappet, the reference character 10 designates the head and 11 the stem of the tappet. The head may be of the usual disc like formation, composed of any desirable forgeable metal suitable for withstanding the usual wear occasioned thereon by the cams of internal combustion engines, as is well understood. The stem is hollow and as a preference is formed from a piece 11 of metal rod bored lengthwise of itself from one end to leave a thin shell '12 (see Fig. 5) and a solid end 13. The metal of which the stem is composed may be the same kind or different from that of which the head is formed. I For instance, the head may be formed of alloys, containing tungsten, or chrome steel, chrome nickel steel, silicon iron and so forth. The stem may be formed of straight steel or other suitable steels as is found most desirable.

In the finished article the solid end 13 is usually bored out and tapped as at 14 (see Fig. 2 for .the usual adjustment stud (not shown The head and hollow stem are united in a novel manner by a forging process, and the method of constructing and umting the parts will now be described.

Referringto Figs. 3, 5, 6 and 7 the head of the tappet is formed from a cup like head piece 10 of suitable dimensions to form the tappet head. Said headpiece 10 has an end wall 10 and an annular side wall 10, the internal diameter of which is made to receive the hollow stem piece 11*.

In assembling the two pieces "10 11 and forming them up into a tappet, the head piece 10' is slipped upon the stem piece ll and temporarily secured theteon by friction or otherwise. The assembled article is then placed in a furnace and heated to a forging temperature. It is then placed in a die A, which has an intaglio design or countersink a, formed in its upper face, which corresponds to the side 15 and edge of the tappet head. The die is placed in the anvil of a suitable powen hammer (not shown) and the hammer arm set in motion.

The arm'ca'rries a suitable heading die A which strikes the parts of the article that protrude abovethe countersink a, inthe die A, and drives them down upon the face of the countersink a, where the head piece 10, and end part 11 of the hollow stem piece 11 (Fig. 5) are spread outward'and laterally into the shape illustrated in Fig. 2. The side wall 10 of the head piece 10, or

a considerable portion thereof, is forced upon the face of the countersink, and the art ll of the stem piece, which is within t e head piece,-follows it and forms the thin widely flaring part 16 seen in Fig. 2. When 'the illustrated shape of countersink a, is used, the lower edge 10 of the head piece is forced into the side of the tappet as shown in Fig. 2. The outer portion of the top of the head piece 10 is forced .down upon the widely flaringpart 16 of the stem 11, and the unsupported middle part of the top is bulged inward toward the hollow of the Stem as at 17. The part of the stem piece adjacent the lower edge, of the head piece being unsupported, is forced inward into.

the hollow of the stem piece, thereby forming an annular shoulder 18. The part of the tappet head 10 which protrudes beyond the stem piece, being supported by the die during the final hammering strokes, is compacted, and those parts are effectively united against possible separation, because of the intimate contact formed between them. They are, to all intents and purposes, forged together into an integral piece and the unsupported interior parts are forced into close and intimate contact. Because of the fact that the relatively thin, widely flaring part 16 of the stem, is embedded in the head portion, and presents relatively wide areas of contact to the metal of the head, incipientfusion takes place during the forging operation and the head and stem are thereby effectively united to such an extent, that the usage to which they are subject in a motor, does not cause separation between them. Furthermore, the inwardly pressed annular part being in intimate contact with the adjacent side of the head, it acts as a shoulder and takes up'its portion of the shock, jar and pressure occasioned by the passage of the cam across the end face of the tappet. Furthermore, said shouldered part reinforces the stem at its place of connection with the head. --The advantages of a hollow .stem valve maasse tappetare well known, lightness in weight, saving of power and increase in mileage are some of theln. The principal objections to two piece .valve tappets, in which the head portion is weldedto the stem, is the danger of separation between the two pieces from ordinary use in a motor. Moreover, such tappets are'comparatively costly to produce, and the difficulty of welding together metals ofwidely different fusing points .is apparent. At best, only poorresults are obtained. Valve tappets made in accordance with the present-invention have overcome all of these obstacles and provide a highly efficient, durable and serviceable article.

More or less variation of the exact details of construction is possible without dearting from the spirit of this invention; T desire, therefore, not to limit myself to. the exact form of the construction shown and described, but intend, in the following claims, to point out all of the invention disl closed herein. v

f I claimasnew, and desire to secure by Letters Patent: 7 I

1. As a new article of manufacture, a forged, headed stem, composed of two pieces of forgeable metal, .and comprising a .disc like head portion anda stem portion, irremovably secured thereto, one end of the stem portion being concave and having a widely flaring laterally extending end part embedded in that part of the metal of the head which projects beyond the sides of the stem, the metal of the head portion being thickened at its middle part and entering the concave space in the flaring end part of the stem, and both faces of said flaring end part being held in intimate contact with and bylthe contiguous metal of the head portion, located on opposite sides of said flaring end-part of the stem.

2. As a new article of mani1facture, a,

of the head portion located on opposite sides of said flaring end part of the stem.

8. A two piece valve tappet, composed of forgeable metals and comprising a forged together disc like tappet head portion and a hollow tappet stem portion, the hollow tappet stem portion having a thin, widely flaring end part embedded in that part of the disc like head portion which protrudes beyond the side of the stem portion, and an inwardly projecting annular shoulder in intimate contact with the side of the head adjacent the stem portion.

4. A two piece'valve tappet, composed of forgeable metals and comprising a forged together disc like tappet head portion and a hollow tappet stem portion, the head portion having a middle portion bulging toward the stem portion, and the hollow tappet stem portion having a thin, Widely flaring end part embedded in that part of the disc like head portion which protrudes beyond the side of the stem portion, and an inwardly projecting annular shoulder in intimateeontact with the bulged side oft-he head adjaeent the stem portion.

GEORGE R. RICH.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3200801 *Mar 11, 1964Aug 17, 1965Gen Motors CorpValve lifter
US3501976 *Feb 24, 1966Mar 24, 1970Thompson Mfg Co Earl ACamshaft
US3502057 *Feb 24, 1966Mar 24, 1970Earl A ThompsonAlloy,article of manufacture,and process
US3502058 *Feb 24, 1966Mar 24, 1970Thompson Earl ARocker arm
US3508529 *Feb 24, 1966Apr 28, 1970Earl Thompson Mfg CoComposite valve structure
US4094279 *May 7, 1976Jun 13, 1978Johnson Products Div. Of Sealed Power CorporationDuctile iron roller tappet body and method for making same
US6871622Oct 18, 2002Mar 29, 2005Maclean-Fogg CompanyLeakdown plunger
US7028654Oct 18, 2002Apr 18, 2006The Maclean-Fogg CompanyMetering socket
US7128034Oct 18, 2002Oct 31, 2006Maclean-Fogg CompanyValve lifter body
US7191745Oct 18, 2002Mar 20, 2007Maclean-Fogg CompanyValve operating assembly
US7273026Oct 18, 2002Sep 25, 2007Maclean-Fogg CompanyRoller follower body
US7281329Feb 2, 2004Oct 16, 2007Maclean-Fogg CompanyMethod for fabricating a roller follower assembly
US7284520Mar 8, 2007Oct 23, 2007Maclean-Fogg CompanyValve lifter body and method of manufacture
Classifications
U.S. Classification123/90.51, 29/888.43, 164/DIG.130
International ClassificationF01L1/14
Cooperative ClassificationF01L1/14, Y10S164/13
European ClassificationF01L1/14