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Publication numberUS1583223 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 4, 1926
Filing dateDec 23, 1925
Priority dateDec 23, 1925
Publication numberUS 1583223 A, US 1583223A, US-A-1583223, US1583223 A, US1583223A
InventorsCooke Maren Katherine
Original AssigneeAnna M Hull
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Card game
US 1583223 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

May 4 1926. 1,583,223

M. K. COOKE CARD GAME Filed Dec. 23, 1925 ZSheets-Shoet 1 9 m fiad-Bqakt ,9

' mvzmon m @1 BY A w W MTTORNEY May 4 1926. 4 1,583,223 M. K. COOKE cum ems Filed Dec. 25, 1925 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 mpJJJ a m 10.92131 e. 7 j y.

azq 2%ar 7 6 air INVENTOR miamezzze'oale $45 a ATTORNEY Patented May 4, 1926.

UNITED STATES 1,583,223 PATENT 0FFICE.

MAREN xn'rnnninn GOOKE, or SPOKANE, wnsnmeron, ASSIGNOR T0 ANNA M.

HULL, or MQKENNA, WASHIINGTON. I

CARD GAME.

Application filed December 23, 1925. Serial No. 77,281.

To all whom it may concern:

Be it known that I, MAREN KATHERINE UOOKE, a citizen of the United States, residing at Spokane, in the county of Spokane and State of Washington, have invented new and useful Improvements in Card Games, of which the following is a specification.

The object of this invention is to provide a novel game apparatus of the nature of a card game wherein a pack of playing cards is involved,

My improved game relates more particularly to that class of games wherein chance and amusement are primary, in contra-distinction to card games where memory and skill are the predominant requirements of a winning player. Hence, my improved game is more especially adapted for young children and to grown-ups who are attracted to this class of game.

As regards younger players, my improved game has an educational value in that it teaches them the appearance of the different kinds of growth illustrated on the cards.

One of the features of my improved game resides in the various coactions between the sets of cards themselves, and in combination with one or more objective cards, and also in combination with one or more minus cards with which the deck is provided.

My invention will be more fully described in connection with the accompanying drawings and will be more particularly pointed out in and by the appended claims.

In the drawings Fig. 1, is a playing face View of my objective card which also bears the highest winning value.

Fig. 2, is a playing face View of my minus card which is a set-back or handicap card.

Fig. 3, is the playing face view of one card of a set, into which the pack is divided, the same showing a banana.

Fig. 4, is a playing face view of another card of the set bearing the representation of a peach.

Fig. 5, is a playing-face View of another set card bearing the representation of a bunch of grapes.

Fig. 6, 1s a playing face view of another set oard illustrated with a lemon.

ig. '7, i'sa playing face View of card at the set illustrated with cherriesi Fig. 8, is a set card illustrated with a pine apple. 7

Fig. 9, is a set card, or card of the set, illustrate-d with an orange.

Fig. 10, is a card of the set illustrated with a pear.

Like characters of reference designate similar parts throughout the different figures of the drawings.

Although my improved playing cards may be employed in numbers with various divisions, I will confine my description to what is herein shown. I have shown a set of eight carols designated by numerals 1 to 8. I may have two or any number of sets of cards as herein disclosed, and for example, it will be assumed that the entire deck of cards is divided into four sets, making a total of thirty-two cards. In addition to these sets of cards, I have shown an objective card 9, of which there may be one or more, and a minus or set-back card 10,

of which there may be one or more but in any event, not more than the number of objective cards, whereby the element of handicap Willbalancethe gain of the objective cards. Thus, in the form shown, in addition to the thirty-two set cards, the objective and minus cards would make the deck consists of thirty-four cards.

Before describing the objective and minus cards in detail, I will first describethe set cards.

As shown, the cards 1 to 8, inclusive, bear reprsentations of a banana 11, a peach 12, a bunch of grapes 13, a lemon 14, a bunch of cherries 15, a pine-apple ,16, an orange 17 and a pear 18. Each card is shown as having represented thereon a single specimen or variety of fruit, and each of the remaining sets, into which the deck is divided, would be identical with the set shown. Thus, in the deck outlined and referred to, as an example, there would be four pear cards four grape cards and so on. I

signs '19 to J5, inclusive. It may be stated that the rear or back faces of all the cards, having no significance 1n the play, may be either plain, or decorated as desired.

Reference will next be made to the objective card 9, and its playing interdependence wtih the cards of the sets.

The card 9, bears the representation of a container or basket 27, and disposed in this basket is illustrated one specimen of each variety of fruit shown on the cards of the sets and designated at 11 to 18, inclusive. I have used the same numerals on the fruit in the basket as are used to designate the same varieties of fruit on the cards of the sets. The legendFruit-basket appears on card 9, as shown. In addition, card 9, is the highest winning card and bears the value 100 with a plus sign, as indicated at 27. In the form shown, the winning value applied to card 9, is greatly in excess of the total values applied to any set of cards of the pack, and I have purposely accentuated this winning value for simplification of this description as any arrangement of values,

- coming within the purview of the claims,

may be adopted.

I will next describe card 10, which is a minus or set-back card.

It will be noted that I have specifically referred to the cards as hearing representations of varieties of fruit, and in the description of the minus card 10, it will appear why fruit is especially adapted to bring out one of the novel and humorous features of the game. On card 10, there is a representation of a. raspberry as indicated at 28. Thus, when play is ended, as will be later described, the winnershouts basket full and then, raspberry. Card 10, is also provided with a minus of 100 as indicated at 29, with a suitably disposed minus sign adjacent thereto. Thus, no matter how high the values of the cards h-eldby the holder or player, the presence of the card 10, will prevent such holder from having a winning hand. In addition, the term raspberry conveys a derogatory or deprecatory implication toward the loser which is highly humorous in this type of game, more especially by reason of the present slang significance with which the word raspberryi is endowed.

I will next indi my improved deck of cards may be played, although I do not wish to be thus limited, except for the limitations of the claims, as a wide range of play is afforded within the limits of playing coaction of the cards.

In one manner of play, it will be assumed that four persons are playing and that to each is dealt eight cards. There will then remain two cards on the board or table. In

a full hand conslsts of eight cards. Now the 7 cards is shown in the basket.

cate the manner in Which players will proceed to trade cards, either by calling out the character of card he wants to trade, or trading blindly. In any event, it will be the object of the players to try to get a basket full hand, as soon as possible, the first to get such a hand, calling out, basket-full and then, if in the rules, raspberry, the latter being directed to the one player supposed to hold the raspberry, card.

Suppose a player drew, initially, or later by trading, a hand consisting of cards designated l to 8, inclusive, then, such a player could call out, basket-full because he would have cards illustrating each specimen of fruit in the basket or objective card 9. However, the values on such a hand would only total eight. Consequently, this type of hand would not be the highest winning hand but the second highest hand, notwithstanding the fact that it constituted a full basket. If by trading or drawing, a player obtained any seven difierent cards of a set, and also card 9, the latter would substitute for the missing card, or eighth card, because every variety of fruit on each set of Then, such player, would call out, basket-full and if he did so, simultaneously with a player obtaining the above described second highest hand, the player with or holding the card 9, in addition to seventh card of a set neither of which is alike, would win. It will be seen that a player might only lack one card of holding a second or highest winning hand and at last, draw a raspberry and thus fail before the raspberry could be traded off. Thus, it will be seen that the hazard and uncertainty is increased in a manner to greatly add to the novelty and excitement of the game.

In another way of considering the play, and to show more particularly, the fanciful idea of the basket, the cards of the entire pack are shuflled and spread face down on the board, and the dealer says basket upset. Then the object of the players is to draw cards of fruit to fill the basket, and they draw hands of the number of cards designated by the rules with this end in view. Of course, anyone drawing or holding the basket-card, never trades it off, but if a player gets the raspberry card, he immediately trades it off, and this card is continually going from one player to the other, the idea being that if a raspberry were gathered together with a lot of fruit in a basket, the raspberry would certainly be mashed.

The rules may be formulated in still another manner, as I will next describe.

Three, four, five or six players may take part using a deck composed of one set of eight fruit cards for each player, and the objective and minus card. The cards may be dealt from right to left, around the table, all the players getting eight cards except the two players at the left of the. dealer getting nine cards. Eight varieties of fruit, no two alike, would count eight points, and seven varieties, together with the fruit basket card, would count one hundred and seven points. Anything less than the aforenamed hands would have no count. and the presence of the minus card in any hand, would reduce such hand in a manner to prevent it from being a winning hand in any event.

As soon as the players have arranged the cards in their hands, they may begin to exchange cards across the table, one or two at a time, with a view of filling the basket. Just as soon as a player fills the basket, he calls out fruit basket full and that ends all play. Thus, it will now be seen that in this form of play, a player at the left of the dealer might hold eight different varieties of fruit cards, and also the basket card, making his count for one game one hundred and eight, which would give a big advantage if a series of games were to be played to make a fixed goal, or in progressive playing.

It is now desired to point out that my improved game is interdependently related to fruit, as an essential part of my invention, not only because fruit distinguishes the game from flower and vegetable cards games, but also because it enables me to take advantage of the specimen raspberry which would lose its novel and slang significance if combined with anything else but fruit, of which it is one family member.

It is believed that my invention will be fully understood from the foregoing description, and while I have herein shown and claimed one specific form of my invention, I do not wish to be limited thereto except for such limitations as the claims may import.

I claim l. A card game of the class described, comprising a pack of playing cards divided into a series of sets of cards and the sets of cards being identical as sets, the several cards of each set each bearing the representation of one kind of fruit, one or more objective cards each bearing the representation of a basket containing all the specimens of fruit shown on all the cards of each set, and one or more minus cards bearing the representation of a fruit not shown in said basket or on said sets of cards.

2. A card game of the class described, comprising, a pack of playing cards divided into sets of cards and the several cards of each set each bearing the representation of a one kind of fruit, and one or more objective cares each bearing the representiation of a basket containing all the specimens of fruit shown on the cards of each set.

3. A game of playing cards of the class described, comprising, a pack of playing cards divided into sets of cards and the several cards of each set each bearing the representation of one kind of fruit, and the holder of a complete set of cards being entitled to the second highest winning hand, and an objective card bearing the representation of a basket containing one each of all the specimens of fruit shown on a set of cards and substituting for any one card of a set less than a full set and entitling the holder to a hand of the highest Winning value.

4. A game of playing cards of the class described, comprising, a pack of playing cards divided into sets of cards and the several cards or" each set each bearing the rep resentation of one kind of fruit, the cards of each set having number values, whereby the holder of a complete set will have a basket full hand of the second highest winning value, and an objective card bearing I the representation of a basket containing one each of all the specimens of fruit shown on a set of cards, and said objective card having a numbered value in excess of the values of any complete set of cards, whereby the holder of a hand including the basket card will have a hand of the highest winning value.

5. A game of playing cards of the class described, comprising, a. pack of playing cards" divided into sets of cards and the several cards of each set each bearing the representation of one kind of fruit, the cards of each set having number values of a con secutive order, whereby the holder of a complete set will have a basket full hand of the second highest winning value, an objective card bearing the representation of a basket containing one each of all the specimens of fruit shown on a set of cards, said objective card having a numbered value higher than any cards of a set, and said basket card being a substitute for any one card of a set and entitling the holder to the highest winning value hand, and a minus card bearing the representation of a derogatory character of fruit and having a minus value number rendering the hand of the holder of no winning value.

In testimony that I claim, the foregoing as my own, I hereby aflix my signature.

MAREN KATHERINE COOKIE.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4230321 *May 10, 1979Oct 28, 1980Smith Mildred EFamily relationships card game
US5702253 *Jul 10, 1995Dec 30, 1997Bryce; Nathan K.Personality testing apparatus and method
US6053498 *Nov 24, 1997Apr 25, 2000Waychoff; Challen W.Game using playing cards, grab items, and body appendages
US6296253Mar 16, 2000Oct 2, 2001Challen W. WaychoffMethod of playing game using playing cards, grab items and body appendages
Classifications
U.S. Classification273/308
International ClassificationA63F1/02, A63F3/04
Cooperative ClassificationA63F1/02, A63F2003/0481
European ClassificationA63F1/02