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Publication numberUS1583488 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 4, 1926
Filing dateApr 8, 1925
Priority dateApr 8, 1925
Publication numberUS 1583488 A, US 1583488A, US-A-1583488, US1583488 A, US1583488A
InventorsPauer Louis
Original AssigneePauer Louis
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Racing game
US 1583488 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

4 provements in Racing` Games,

` YVhile adapt-able for Patented May 4, 1926.

PATENT OFFICE.

LOUISAPAUER, OF CLEVELAND, OHIO.

RACING' GAME.

To au whom it may concern: i j

Be it known that I, LOUIS PAUER, a citizen of the United States, residing at Cleveland, in the county of Cuyahoga and State of Ohio, have invented new and useful Imof which the following is a specification. v

This invention is a useful and new or improvedracing game played for entertainment and instruction in demonstrating the value of jockeyship under conditions closely approaching actual horse-racing contests. imitating'other racing contests this game meets a combination suitference or ved'particularly for and horse-racing. j

For thel reproduction of auto racing by means of this invention thel most important factor of speed with accidents and mishaps resulting therefrom is imitated through the introduction of a chance controlling ele- -ment, a standard deck of playing lcards being used in combination with a racing board and movable members under regula-V tions providing for a series of drawings in which the drawing of certain high cardsof predetermined values will enable a player to progress at ahigher rate of speed while at the. same time exposingy hi'm toloss of ground, if not elimination from t-he race, upondrawing more high cards in succession, in which event theplayerwillbe supposed-to have suffered some natural consequence attending; excessive speed, as a wreck that may cause his elimination, or a hot-box, tire trouble vand other mishaps that may only retard his progress. In order that the element of chance may not be the sole conparticipants degree, it is further provided that a player, upon drawing certain high cards, may elect to waive a part of the allowance to avoid loss of ground should he draw more high cards -inv succession.

The most important factor in horse-racing when the starters are well matched is the strategy of .the jockeys in avoiding interloss of ground from going wide 1nsetting and forcing the simulating of auto and their judgment the pace or in saving their mounts for the y final drive.

In the reproduction of horse-racing contests by'means of this invention the vmost important controlling factor is the skill or permit of v that may be rules being devised Appucaapn mea April s, 1925. semi No, 21,536.

judgment of the jockey-players, without the use of cards or the introductiony of other chance elements over which a player may have no control, excepting as his chances 1n a race may be aEect'ed by the moves of the other players under regulations that will a great variety of combinations of plays, and under4 different sets of rules based substantially upon the main features employed in the construction of the racing-board illustrated in the preferred embodiment of my invention, said with a view of equalizing the winning chances of each player, skill and judgment otherwise equal, regardless of his post position at the start of a race.

-In order to ycarry out these aims my invention provides playing periods that, under different sets of rules, may represent equal or unequal distances of a race course. Within these playing periods are a series of rails or tracks intersected at regular intervals by distinguishable transverse lines or spaces, preferably .numbered perfora- 'tions, each representing a short distance comparable with the length of a horse.

Among other preferred regulations, a player may lose one or more lengths by exceeding a variable'speed limit provided for the different rails, or by traveling too slow, alsoI by going wide around the turns rand by crossing more than a limited number of railsin a single playing period to gain a more advantageous position.

' In order to offset the disadvantage of the starters in the outer rails at the turns, and to enable them to gain ground vin the straightaway portions of the track, it is provided that the speed limit in the inner rails shall be slightly less than that inthe outer rails, on the assumption that horses cannot fully extend themselves in the inner positions where they may be forced to race in close quarters. This variation in the speed klimit for the different rails also imitates a track condition that often existsin actual racing when the footing near the inner rail is less firm which enables those on the outside to travel faster.

Now with reference to the drawings, Fig. 1 is a plan view of aboard or base representing a race course designated as the racing-board. Fig. 2 is that .of a movable member representing a jockey mounted on a running horse, and Fig. 3 represents a racing auto. Fig. 4 represents movable tallying pegs.

Fig. 1 illustrates the preferred embodiment of a racing board to further the objects of my invention. For th Y which the players move.

playing periods and lines IR representing the inner and are shown lonof broken lines concentric about the turns. aid broken lines indicate rails Within the and OR, the same outer rails of a race course,

gitudinal slots in a series eight in number, but on racing-boards of larger or smaller dimensions the number of rails may be increased or reduced. The numerals 1 to 8 inclusive rinted or stamped upon the racing-board rom the inner tothe outer rail of the course indicate the number of each rail.

e intervals shown by the broken lines are designated as playing positions, and they represent a distance comparable with the length` of a starter, which may vary under different sets of rules. Under my preferred represents one The'number of said intervals in each playing period and in each l is twelve, and they are numbered in onsecutive order by the numerals inclusive to .indicate the relative period is Vei hty, positions suflce to of this invention w e economizing space. e number of these playing 'positions in each eriod may however be increased or reduce and the number periods for various sets of rules.y

Instead ofthe broken lines, as shown'in Fig. 1, theY rails with the .playing positions may be delineated upon the racing-board by a series of lines intersected by transverse es, vcircles or squares of varying colors to carry out the objects be divided into l preferred embodiment i may vary in different th guide the players in placing their iigures which may be mounted on suitable supports. But with displacement are stamped into a thin longitudinal slots which may consist of layer of sheet metal one or more strips L fastened upon the surface of the board. The movable members as shown in the drawing, provided with projections to engage in the slots. l ying pegs shown in Fig. 4 are likewise provided with projections that engage inthe rectangular slots of the tabuof the inner elliptical portion of the racing-board, for both horse and auto-racing used in tallying the number the distances traveled.

.playing rules are printed or stamped upon t e inner the racing-board.

e game of horse-racingissimulated by means of this invention under the following preferred regulations :`Each player is allowed the same total of lengths, the total number of lengths depending upon the disance of 'a race agreed upon, eight-y lengths eing allowed for each eighth of a mile. ie jocked-players advance their figures laying period to another within hen going wide at th'e turns. the players are further subjected to the loss of one or more lengths in single playing they exceed the maximum and ground at the turns or to travel faster in the outer rails.

Therplayers in starting these contests rst draw or post positions by drawing numbers corresponding with the number of the ligure they shall advance and the number of the rail the shall occupy at the start of the race. he player drawing number 1 figure of the same number and from the rail of that number into the next laying period play ing position that in his judgment may seem most advantageous as he may try to anticipate the moves of the others who follow in the order of their post positions.

to any railand Figs. 2 and 3, are

The game once started, the player in the players in period No. 3 should occupy the lead always'moves first and the others :tolsame playing positions in rails 2, 5 and 6, low in the order of their positions in the the player in rail 6 would advance his figure course of arace. lirst and the player occupying rail 5 would Players occupying or entering rails 1 and follow. But with the same alignment in 70 2 may advance their figures from seventyperiod 4 the player occupying'rail 5 will seven to eighty lengths in each playing advance his figure first followed by the period. player in rail 2, the starter in rail 6 being In rails 3, 4 and 5 the players may advance forced to enterv an inner rail to avoid loss their mounts from seventy-seven to eightyof ground in period 5. With the same align- 75 one lengths, the maximum distance for a sinment in period 5 the playerin rail 2 will adgle period being equivalent to one urlong Vance his figure first, he beingin the most and one length. In two playing periods the advantageous position to avoid loss ot' maximum distance will equal two urlongs ground in period 6, and the player occupyand two lengths when a player occupying ing rail 5 will follow. said rails may set his figure into playing In order that a player may enter or cross position No. 82. Players remaining in rails a rail between two others occupying thc 3, 4 and 5, or forced to enterthe same in same or adjacent rails, the other players periods 2 and 6 will lose one length going must be separated by at least Jfour lengths. wide. Thus, if players 2 and 3 in period 5 should 85 Players occupying rails-6, 7 and 8, 01 occupy rail 2, separated by three lengths, or entering the samefrom other rails, may adif player 3 should occupy rail 3 the saine vance their mounts from seventy-seven t0 distance behind player 2 in rail 2, then the eighty-two lengths. Those remainlng in players in the outer rails could notl enter or said rails or forced to' enter the same 1n cross rail 2 between players 2 and 3 to avoid 90 periods l, 3, 5 and 7, partly on the turns, loss of ground in period 6. And if players 4 will lose one length going wide, and 1n and 5 in period 3 should occupy rail 3, sepaperiods 2 and 6 they will lOSe tWO lengthsrated by three lengths, then the starters in In any rail a player may advance his rails 1 and 2 could not enter or cross rail 3 mount one length in excess of the s eed between players 4 and 5 to travel faster in 95 limit of the rail occupied or entered rom the outerrails. another rail, at the cost of one length, and When one of two players occupyin adjahe will lose one length for each length cent rails must advance his figure rst in traveled below the minimum speed limit of the order of precedence, he may enter the seventy-seven lengths. Crossing more than adjacent rail so occupied, or he may cross 100 three railswithin a single period will result the same, by allowing the other player to in a loss of one length for each rail crossed travel. in his turn a distance of eighty in excess of that number. lengths. Thus, if player 8 in period 4 should A player must remain at least two lengths occupy rail 6, one length in advance of behind inA following another starter occupyplayer 7 in rail 5, then player 8, in order to 10" ing the same rail. avoid loss of ground from going wide'invv In order to enter or cross a rail in front period 5, and being prevented from entering of a starter occupying another rail' one R5 in advance of P7, may enter or cross rail length behind, a player must advance his 5 by advancing his figure seventy-seven mount at least eighty-one lengths inl the lengths which will enable player 7 in his next period, and with a lead of two lengths turn to travel eighty lengths. over the other starter he must travel at least When a player from an inner rail crosses eighty lengths in the next period to do so; an outer rail occupied by another traveling when running abreast with another starter at a slow rate of speed, he may sufer a a player must travel at, least eighty-two loss of ground from traveling below the lengths, it being assumed that all the starters speed limit. Thus, if'plajer 5 in period 6 will travel eighty lengths in'each period should occupy Arail 3 and advance his igurc whether or not they elect to do so. only seventy-seven lengths into period 7 When two or more players at the end of another player in crossing rail 3 from an a race finish in the same position in dife* inner rail would be forced to follow two ferent rails, the winners are decided in the lengths behind, which would entail a loss of order of the rails they occupy, it being suptwo lengths from a position on even terms posed that the contenders in that situation with player 5 in period 6 and a loss of one finish heads and noses apart. length from a position one length behind When two or more players occupy the player 5 in the same period; but a player same laying ositions in different rails occu in(r a )osition two lengths behind n 7 n n,

travel faster without a loss by remaining 1n may travel the maximum distancevin ano'tlicr those in the inner rails move first, excepting player 5 in period 6 could cross rail 3 withwhen the players 1n the outer rails may out a loss, and then, if he' elects tr do so, he

or entering the outer rails. Thus,if three rail. ..130

Vegy may be followed ment of the starters may force Tn order that th In the absence of an agreement a race will be at one mile. It will be found thatraces of shorter and longer distances present different problems, but the same rules apply for all distances.

The number'l of lengths that each player as in reserve for the nal playing period readily by reference to the position he occupies and the number o-f lengths lost, if any. There is no need of taking into account the total number of lengths in a race. lVith a loss of one length a player can advance no farther at the finish than position No. 79, and to position No.78 with a loss of two lengths. Thus, if player 1 in rail l and in period 7 were leadino` in position 85, without'a loss charged against him, he would have seventy-five? lengths left in reserve, with the result` that in a race at a mile he would lose two lengths in the final period, one for each length traveled less than seventyfseven, and he would finish in position No. 78. If player No. 2 were second in the raceat that stage, in rail 2 and posi# tion No. 83, without a loss charged against him, lie would have seventy-seven lengths in reserve which would enable him to win th race finishing in position No. '80.

.layer may win a race byA gainin a position other than N o. if the others ail to pass him, when one or more starters, with enough lengths in reserve that would otherwise enable them to gain a more advanced u be blocked and forced to go wide around the turns or to cross more than three rails. The 'game presents innumerable combinations of plays as each player will be forced to follow different methods depend-v ing upon his post position and his tactics in "each playing period. l

various combinations a` ayer may succeed in winning arace withhe may also win after losout a loss,'and three lengths,

groundmarf. t e co-operation of one orA two players Who have likewise made sacriiices when, in order to improve their winning'chances,` these players willv -be forced td'co-operate in bringing about the defeat? of the others who may tr to win without 'su-fground. This strat more consistently when each player vadvances-two orymorel starters as his entries. l

Any number of players 'may participate, not exceeding eight. And as a singleplayer may experiment with various combinations by advancing all the starters,vthis inventionA also offers an-interesting game of solitaire. e position of the startersl 1n each of the playing periods 'may remain' Y in that the period representing one quarter as t e alignv- .hirn to vary l 1n the course of a race.-

vtwo cards in his turn if i result of traveling too fast.

y mam ata stand-still while caused .by a

in view Vfor the detection of irregularities andy as a guide for the players in observing the moves of vthe other contestants, veach player is provided with eight figures, -one for each playing period. One set of pegs is used for tallying the number of lengths lost.,l

In simulating auto racing by means of this invention under myI preferred regulations, the playing periods serve another purpose drawing 'of different cards determines the number of periods a player will beallowed to advance his figure, each of 4a mile, it being assumed that the racing-board representsa two-mile course. The playing positions in the rails also serve another purpose in that each indicates the denomination ForIauto-.racing the numerical order. of

nine he Will three-quarter the rails serves only'to indicate the relal tive position of thev driver-players in the' course of a race. Thus, if player 6 were in the lead he would place tion along rail No. l, and if player 3 were second in the race he would place his figure along rail No. 2, but, if

by another they would others vfollow in the .order of` their position Itis possible however fora player in last position to draw he should overhaul play. I

provided for the ,but not two aces,

all the others in a single Playing positions are drawing of a `single ace,

as this eliminates the player, it being supposed that his machine was wrecked as the The drawing of an ace and then a king, or a king firsty followed by an ace, will greatly retard a players` progress in that he will be forced toreuponhim or lincrease their event it will vbe supposed that the delay was hot-box." he drawing of an ace followed bya queen or theisame followed by an ace will retard a playersprogress in that he will be permitted ure only one-quarter of a mile. distance is allowed upon the drawing of two the others gain lead',in which kings in successive drawings. The drawing of a king and then a queen, or in the reverse order, will advance a player only one-half mile, and the drawing of two queens threefourths of a mile. Upon the drawing of one or more jacks the player will' be permitted to advance his figure two miles vfor each.

The playing positions provided for the drawing of jacks and other cards of lower denominations serve only as a convenience in placing the figures and to control the order of precedence in drawing cards.

`A player drawing a high card may waive part of the allowance when he will place his figure into the position provided for the allowance he accepts, as if he had drawn a card of a lower denomination.

Instead of the, broken lines, as shown in Fig. 1, the rails with the playing positions may be delineated upon the racing-board bya series of lines intersected by transverse lines, circles or squares of varying colors to guide the players 'in placing their figures which may be mounted on suitable supports. But with a, view of preventing displacement of the figures I prefer to provide the racingboard with means for holding the figures in position, and in order alignment of the figures and to protect 4the wearing surfaces of the retaining. means, longitudinal slots are stamped into i layer of sheet metal which may cons st of one or more strips fastened upon the upper surface of the board. The movable members as shown in the drawing, Figs. 2 and 3, are provided with projections to engage in the slots. The tallying pegs shown in Fig. 4 are likewise provided with projections that engage in the rectangular slots of the tabulators, one at each end of the inner elliptical portion of the racing-board, for both horse and auto-racing that are used in tallying the number of lengths lost and the distances traveled. When the autos have traveled ten miles an additional set of pegs is used tally from ten to fifty miles after each block of ten miles. For ready `reference the principal playing rules are printed or stamped upon the inner portion of the racing-board.

Examples n horse and. auto-racing.

- The following is an example showing how eight players may` advance their figures in a gaine simulating horse-racing at a distance of one mile, the abbreviations P, R, Po and L being used for Player, I-ail, Position and Length respectivel Period 1. P'l--R3--Po 82, loss one L excecding speed limit o`f 81 Ls in R3; P2 R2-Po 80; P3-R1-Po 80; P'4--R4--Po 81; P5--R5--Po 81; P6--R6-Po 82, loss one L going wide in R6; P7-R5-Po 79; P8--R5-Po 77 players 2,

a thin to.l

In order to enter R3 where he can travel faster and to enable him to cross in front of players 2 and 3, P1 must travel 82 Ls, hlsobject being to avoid interference by sacrificing one or more Ls in gaining a will enable him to force others of the race. Under favorable developments, with five or six players taking losses in the early stages of a race, a player might win by sacrificing one or more Ls, but in this example the winning chances of P1 are lessened when 3, 7 and 8 advance their figures with a View of avoiding losses at the rst turn.

Period 2. Pl-RS--Po 83, loss one yL going wide in R3, total loss two Ls; P6--R4- Po 83, loss one L goin two Ls; P4--R wide in R4; P5-R5-Po 82, loss one L going wide in R5; P3-R1-Po 80; P2-R2-Po 80; P7-R2--Po 78; P8-R2-Po 76. In this period players 7 and 8 cross three rails to avoid loss of ground by entering R2. lVith a lead of one L in period 1, P6 is enabled to cross in front of players 4 and 5 by traveling 81 Ls in entering Period 3. 84; P-R-Po 83; P4--R4--Po 82; P2- R--Po 81; P3-R3-Po 81; P7--R3-Po 78; P9-LR4-Po 77. While the players in this period save ground by avoiding rai 7 and 8, they also avoid rails 1 and 2 to travel faster in rails 3, 4 and A5,.

Period 4. P6-R4--Po 85; P1-R3-Po 85; P5--R6-Po 85; P4--R4--Po 83; P2 RG-Po 83; P3--R3-Po 82; P7-R3--Po 79; P8`R4Po 78. Both occupying Po 84 in period 3, P6 is entitled to precedence over P1 in the order of their moves, P6 being in a position to enter R6 where he could travel faster without a loss' if he elected to do so. For the same reason P2 is entitled to precedence over P3 in this period, each Po 81 in period 3.

P4-R4--Po 83; R-Po 83; P3-R2-Po 82;` P7-R3--Po 80; P8-R4--Po 79. In period 4 players 1, 6 and 5 occupy the same playing positions in rails 3, 4 and 6 respectively, but as P1 is in the most. favorable position he moves first in entering period 5. At this stage P5 haslost only one L, but with players 1 andv 6 going wide m perl 4-Po 81, loss one L'goingforward I0 0 wide in R4, total loss occupying rails 1 and 2 he will be'forced to 12 going -wide in kperiod 5-` a going wide in R4, total loss two Ls; P2`R5-Po 80, loss one L going wide in R5; P3-R2-Po 79; P7-R2-Po 77; P8-R4Po 79, loss one L going wide in R4. In period 6 P1 travels 79 Ls to prevent P6 from gaining a two-length lead over him. With a view of preventing the trailers from gaining ground, P4 travels 78 Ls, and P2 and to enter RK-Po V of P2, thereby traveling 81 Ls in R5 while P Vavoids a loss going wide in R6.` In periodonly 77. As P3 cannot expect to get through in one of the inner rails, outside and falls back advancing only 77 Ls in R2, which also crowds back P7 who follows in the same rail. P8 no7 takes has first loss by going 'wide in R4-Po 79 with a view of going around the leaders. At this stage 3 and 7 arel the only players without a loss.

Period 7. Pl-Rl-Po 81; P6-R2-4Po 81; P5-R3`Po 80; P4R4-Po 78; P2* R5-Po 78; P8R5`Po 80; P3-R5`Po 76; P7-, -R4-,Po 76. ln period 7 players 1 and 6 advance their figures into Po 81, which leaves them 77 Ls in reserve toiinish in Po 78; each having lostl two Ls, they can advance no farther. P4 travels only 77 Ls advancing into Po 78 to crowd back those behind him who might enter R4. `P2 in R5 does likewise traveling only 78 Ls, |`but he overlooks P8 who may now pass around him. From Po 79-'R4, P8 is enabled to pass P2 80, two Ls in advance crossing not more than three rails, two ,rails from 4 into 6 and one rail from 6 back into R5; by entering R5 in period 7, P8y also 7, P3 is forced to enter R5-Po 76; he cany in R6. This p position-in R4.

not enter R6 because that would entail a loss of two Ls, one orcrossing four rails from R2 into R6, and the other from going.I wide also fo'rces IP7 into the same total loss one L; P4`R4--Po 78, totalloss he must try for the cards are shuiiled after each-draw. K y K P6 draws and accepts an 78, total loss two` l,total of four V'tal of four Ms; P4 dis 1% Ms, d

l' 5-R2-Po 2`4. P3 draws an ace which he accepts for the full distance, 2% Ms, into period 3-R14Po 1-, tallying two Ms; P1 now entering R2 and P2`R3. P4 draws an eight, dis 1% Ms, into period 7R2-Po 8-10; P1 now entering R3 and P2`R4. P5 draws a three, dis 1% Ms, into period 5+R5-Po 2`4. P6 draws an ace which he accepts for the full distance, va-ncing into period 3`R2 Po lA, tallying two Ms; P4 now entering R3, P1-R4, P2`R5 and P-Rt. P7 draws a seven, dis 1% Ms, into period R4-Po 5*7;P1 now entering R5, P2-R6 and 13d-R7. P8 raws a six, dis 11/2 Ms, into period 6-R5- Po V5 7 P1 now entering R6, P2-R7 and P5-R8. The cards are now shuiiied for the next draw.

Second draw. P3 occupying R1 draws a deuce, dis 1%c Ms, advancing from period 3 into 8`R11-Po 2-4 tallying two Ms for a total of four Ms. P6 is lucky in drawing a ten after an ace, dis 1% Ms, from period 3 into 2f-R1`Po 8-10..tallying two M s for a total oi four Ms; P3 now entering R2. P4 draws a deuce, dis 11A his, from period 7 into 4-R3`Po 2-4, tallying two Ms. P7 draws a jack, dis 2 Ms, advancing from period 6 intothe same period, R3-P0JA, tallying two Ms; P4 now entering Ri-`4. P8 draws a three, dis 1% -6 im@ 3 R5 P I drawsa king which he accepts for the full distance of'21/2 Msf,-ad'vancing from period 5 into )7*R3--Po l-K, tallying two Ms; 7 now entering`R4, P4-R5 and P8-R6. draws a seven, dis 11/2 Ms, from period 5 into 3"R6-Po 547, tallying two Ms; P8 now entersR7, one L behind P2'. P5 draws a ten, dis 1% Ms, from period 5 into 4-R5-Po 8-10, tallying two Ms; P4 now ventering R6, P2`R7 and P8-R8. The

Third draw. ace for vthe'full distance, 2% Ms, advancing from period 2 into 5-'R`1-Po 1-A, tallying two M's. for a total of siX` his. P3 draws a three. dis 1% Ms, A,from peridd 8 into 5 R2-Po 2,-4. P1 draws a four, dis 11/4l Ms, from period 7 into 4-R3`Po 2 4, tallying two Ms for a total of four Ms. P7 draws an eight, dis 1% Ms.- from period 6 into 5`R3-Po 8-10, tallying two Ms for a Ms; P1 now entering R4.- P5

dra-ws a nine, dis 1% Ms, from period 4 into 3-R5Po 8410, tallying two Ms for a total of four Ms. P4 draws a seven, dis 11/2 Ms, from period 4 into 2-R6-P0 -7, tallying two his for a total of four his. P2 draws a ten, dis 1% Ms, from period 3 into 2-R56-Po 8;-10, tallying two Ms for a tonow entering R7. P8 rawsa six, dis 11/2 Ms, from period 3 into l of four MS.

2% Ms, ad-

Ms, from periodL o 2-4, tallying two Ms. P1

` Po 5-7, tallying two Ms for a total L30 P4 draws a three,

. four Ms tering R7. P4 draws 'a ten,

Fourth draw. P6 is lucky for the second time in drawing a jack after an ace, dis 2 Ms, advancing from period 5 intothe same period, Rl-Po JA, tallying'two Ms `for a total of eight Ms. P3 draws a siX.-dis 11/2 Ms, from period 5 into 3'-R-2.Po 5-7, tallying two Msfor a total ot six' Ms. P7 draws and accepts a queen, dis 2% Ms, from period 5 into 6-R2--Po 1--Q, tallying two Ms for a total of six Ms; P3 now entering R3. P1 draws a duce, dis 1% Ms, from period 4 into 1-R4-Po 2F43 tallyingtwo Ms for a total of six Ms. dis 11A? Ms, from period 3 into 1-'-R4-P'o 5-7, tallying two Ms for a total of siX Ms; P1 now entering R5. P2 draws a tour, dis 11A Ms, from period 2 into 7-R6-Po 2-4.

dis 11A Ms, from period 2 into 7 -R7--Po 2-4. P8 draws an eight, dis 1% Ms,

8-10, tallying two Ms for a total et. six Ms; P2 now enetering lR7 and P4-R8.

Fifth draw. P6 draws a five, dis 11/2 Ms, from period 5 into 3-R1-Po 5-7, tallying two Ms for a total of ten Ms. P7 draws and accepts an ace, dis 2% Ms. from period 6 into 1-dR2--Po 1-A,tallying tour Ms for a total of ten Ms. P3 draws a five, dis 1% Ms, from period 3 into 1-R3 Po 5-7, tallying two Ms for a total of eight Ms. P5 draws a five, dis 11/2- Ms. from period 1 into 7-R4-Po 5-7. P1 draws a four, dis 1% Ms, from period 1 into 6-R5-Po 2-4. P8 draws a three, dis 1% MS, from period Sinto 5-R6-Po 2 4. P2 draws an eight, dis 13%; Ms, from period 7 into 6-R5--Po .8-10,`tallying two Ms for a total of six MS;`P1 now entering R6 and PS-R7. P4 draws a seven, dis 11/2 Ms, from period 7 into 5-R8Po 5-7, tallying-two Ms for a total of six Ms.

Sixth draw. PG draws a nine. dis 153/; Ms, from period 3 into 2--R tallying two Ms for a total of twelve Ms. P7 draws a six. dis 1172 Ms, from period i into 7-R2Po 5-`7. P3 draws 'a ten, dis 1% Ms, from period 1 into 8-R3-Po 8-10, tallying two Ms for a total of ten Ms. P5 draws a six, dis 11/2 Ms, from period 7 into 5--R4-Po 5-7, tallying two Ms for a total of eight Ms. P2 draws and accepts a queen, dis 21A Ms, from period 6 into 7-R4-Po 1-Q, tallying two Ms for a total of eight Ms; P5 now entering R5. P1 draws and acceptsa king, dis 21/2 Ms, from period 6 into for a total of ten ing R4, vP2--R5 and P5-R6- and accepts a queen for a distance ot 21A Ms, from period 5 into 6--R6-Po 1-Q, tallying two Ms for a total of eight Ms; P5 now endis 1% Ms, from period 5 into 4--R-8-Po 8-10, tallying two Ms for a total of eight Ms.

Seventh draw. P6 draws a queen and ac- Ms P3 now enter- `P5 draws a ive,

vtotal of ten Ms;

from period 1 into S-RG-Po L total of twelve his;

cepts it as a jack, into the salne Rl-Po JA, tallying two Ms for a total of fourteen Ms. P7 draws a six, dis 11/2 Ms, from .period 7 into 5-R2--Po 5-7, tallying two Ms for a total ot twelve Ms. .P1 draws a. queen after a king. advancing only -1/2 M, from perio into 2--R3-Po K--Q,. P3 draws and ac-i cepts a king, dis 21/2 Ms, from period 8 into 2-R3-Po 1-.K'` tallying two 4Ms for a total of twelve Ms; P1 now entering R4. P2 draws a three dis 11A Ms, from period 7 into 4-R4--Po 2--4, tallying two Ms for a P1 now entering R5. P8 draws a nine, dis 1% Ms. from period 6 into 5--R4-Po 8-10. tallying two Ms for a total of ten Ms; P2 now entering R5 and P1-R6. P5 draws a ten, dis 1% Ms, from period 5 into 4--R5--Po 8-10, tallying two Ms for a total often `Ms; P2 now entering 12.6 and P1-R'7- VP4 draws an eight, dis 1% Ms. from period 4 into 3-R7-Po 8-10. tallying two Ms for a total ot ten P1 now entering R8.

Eighth draw. P6 draws an eight, dis 13/4 Ms. from period 2 into 1-R1 Po 8--10, tallying two Ms for a total of .sixteen Ms. P7fdraws a. jack. dis 2 Ms, from period 5 into the saine, R2Po JA, tallying two Ms for a total of fourteen Ms. P3. also draws a jack. dis 2 Ms, from period 2 into the same, R3-Po JA, tallying two'Ms for a total ot fourteen Ms. P8 draws al four,vdis 11,4 Ms. from period 5 into 2-R4--Po 2-4, taslying two Ms for a total of' twelve Ms. P5 draws a. tenwdis 1% yMs. from period 4 into 3f-i4-Po Ms for a total of twelve Ms; P8 lnow enter-I ing` R5. P2 draws and accepts an ace, dis 9% Ms, from period 4 into R4-Po 1A, tallying two Ms for a total ot twelve Ms;

a nine, dis 1% Ms. .from period 3 into 2-R6-Po 8-10. tallying two Ms Jfor a P8 now entering P1 draws a. three, dis 11/1 Ms, Jfrom period 2 into 7R8Po 2-4.

Ninth draw. P6 draws a queen and accepts it as a jack, dis 2 Ms, from period 1 into the same, Rl-Po J A, tallying two Ms for a total of eighteen Ms. P7 draws a six, dis 11/2 Ms.- fromperiod 5 into 3-R2-Po 5-7, tallying two Ms for a total ot' sixteen Ms. P3 draws a queen after a king, ad-

rom period 2 into 4-R3-Po K4-Q.. P2 draws a king after an are and remains in the saine period, R4-Po'ik-K. P5 draws a nine. is 1% lVls. from period 3 into 2--R4-Po 8-10, tallving two Ms for a total of Jfourteen P2 now entering R5. P4 draws and'accepts a king. dis\21/ Ms. from period 4-R3--Po 1-K. tallving two Ms forv a total of fourteen Ms; P3 nowentering R4, P5-R5 and'P2--R6. P8 draws a seven,

dis 2 MS, from period I2 8-10. 'rallying two 2 into Letters Patent is dis l1/ Ms, from period 2 into 8 R6-Po 5 7, tallying two Ms for a total of fourteen Ms; P2 now entering R7. P1 draws a ten, dis 1% Ms, from periodv 7 into 6`R7-Po 8-10, tallying two Ms for a total of twelve Ms; P2 now entering R8.

Tenth draw. P6 now draws an eight, dis 1% Ms, from period l into 8-R1Po 8-10, tallying two Ms for a total of twenty Ms.

As the other players now have no chancein another draw to finish in advance of the leader in Po 8-10, P6 wins the race. This drawing may be completed and additional drawings may be had to decide the winners of second, third and fourth positions.

Having thus described my invention what I claim as new and desire to secure by l, For a game simulating racing contests upon a board or base in combina-tion with movable figures representing starters, the contestants in the order of their standing in a race periodically advancing the same for a predetermined total of lengths depending upon the distance of a race, each move representing. an advance comparable with the distance between fractional mile posts of a race course and within fixed and optional limits of travelequa-ling one or more lengths of thestarters represented by the movable igiures, the starters in the outer positions being permitted to travel relatively faster while subjected to the loss. of one or more lengths in going'wide around the turns, said starters being further subjected to the loss of one or more lengthswhen exceeding .maximum and traveling below minimum sneed `limit-s and when crossing more than a limit-ed number of rails in gaining a more `advantageous position :-A diagram upon a board' or base delineating one or more 'co'nsecutively numbered playing periods, each .lr'ep-resenting a predetermined distance .of

travel corresponding with the distance between one o r more fractional mile posts'of a race course, said playing periods comprising a series of numbered parallel and concentric lines designated as rails, the samebeing subdivided atl regular intervals by consecutively numbered transverse lines or perforations constituting at the intersections a series of playing positions, each representing a predetermined dist-ance comparable with the length of the starters, the playing positions occupi-ed by the contestants indicating their progress within fixed and optional limits of travel in each playing period7 said playing positions representing only a. limited -number of lengths in such playing periods of a predetermined total for economizing space upon the racing-board.

2. For a garnie simulating automobile rac'- ing upon a board o-r basein combination with astandard predetermined values and movable figures representing autos, the contesta-nts in the order of their standing in a race periodically advancing the sanie'variable distances determined by t-he cartls drawn, said cards ofl higher values when drawn in succession 'simulating unfavorable occurrences attenddeck of playing cards of` ing excessive speed by retarding the progress of the players in t-he course of a race A diagram upon a boardor base delineat-ing one or'more consecutively numbered playing periods, each ,representing av predetervmined distance of travel correspondingl with the distance between one or more fractional mile posts of a race course, said playing periods. cniprising a series of numbered ,parallel and concentric lines designated as rails, the same being subdivided at regular intervals by transverse lines or longitudinal perforations designated byletters and numerals as playing positions. indicating the denomination or the distance'value of' the card last drawn by theplayers occupying the same, the playing positions"being occupied by the players course of a race.

LOUIS PAUER.

yin t-he rails corresponding in number with their standing inthe

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3231279 *Oct 18, 1962Jan 25, 1966Waddington Ltd JAutomotive racing game apparatus
US5048841 *May 21, 1990Sep 17, 1991Bar M. CompanySimulated racing board game and methods of utilizing same
US5564701 *Apr 28, 1995Oct 15, 1996Dettor; Michael K.Casino oriented gaming apparatus and method incorporating randomly generated numbers
US6257577Sep 1, 2000Jul 10, 2001Nancy H. SuttonGame of cribbage and method of playing the same
WO1991017802A1 *Apr 1, 1991Nov 28, 1991Bar M CompanySimulated racing board game and methods
Classifications
U.S. Classification273/246
International ClassificationA63F3/00
Cooperative ClassificationA63F3/00082, A63F3/00006
European ClassificationA63F3/00A10