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Publication numberUS1586915 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 1, 1926
Filing dateFeb 18, 1926
Priority dateFeb 18, 1926
Publication numberUS 1586915 A, US 1586915A, US-A-1586915, US1586915 A, US1586915A
InventorsPendergast Overton W
Original AssigneePendergast Overton W
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Process of manufacturing groups of sheets consecutively numbered
US 1586915 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 1 ,1926. S 1,586,915

0. W. PENDERGAST PROCESS OF MANUFACTURING GROUPS OFSHEETS CONSECUTIVELY NUMBERED 'Filed Feb. 18, 1926 2 Sheefis-Sheet 2 PTQ.E.

gin wanton UvErIunW. Pender'gasl Patented June 1, 1926.

uuirsn stares OVERTON W. PENDERGAST,

PROCESS OF MANUFACTURING GROUPS Application filed February The present invention relates to the artof printing, and more particularly to a novel method of manufacturing groups of sheets consecutively numbered for use such as shipping tags, stock tags, job tags, tabs, slips for printed forms of any kind.

The automatic numbering machines now on the market for printing numbers consecutively, cannot print in relatively large type owing to the mechanical construction thereof, and the cost of printing numbers consecutively on the ordinary type of printing press has been prohibitive owing to the amount of time required for the gathering operation. It is often desired to economically produce printed forms consecutively numbered with numerals larger than those that can be produced with ordinary press numbering machines on ordinary printing presses.

It is therefore a primary object of this invention to provide a novel and useful process of manufacturing groups of sheets containing consecutive numbers printed from type alone in a quicker and more economical manner than is possible by the methods now in common use.

A further object of the invention is the provision of a novel means of printing con secutive numbers on tags or forms whereby handling or gathering of the forms after being printed may be accomplished in a more expeditious manner than by methods heretofore used.

A still further object of the invention is to provide a novel method of producing groups of sheets consecutively numbered with relatively large numerals on an ordinary type of press in an expeditious and economical manner so that the sheets may be placed upon the market at a reasonable cost. 7 y 7 Other objects and advantages of the invention will be apparent during the course of the, following detail description, taken in connection with the accompanying drawings, forming a part of thisspecifioation and in which drawings:

Figure 1 is a plan view of a number of the basic stock cards or sheets cut to a desired size for forming a given number of forms. t

Figure 2 is a plan view of a basic card or sheet h i g e numerals p nted thereon,

PATENT OFFICE.

or 'rnnnn nanrn, INDIANAZ or streams consncn'rrvnmr NUMBERED.

18, 1926. Serial NO. 89,222.

and forming the first card or sheet of a se ries of forms beginning with 000 and ending with 999.

Figure 3 is a plan view of the second printed sheet of the series.

Figure 4 is a plan view of the next to the last printed sheet of the series.

Figure 5 is a plan View of the last printed sheet of the series.

' Figure 6 is a detail view illustrating the arrangement of the printed stock sheets. after the first gathering operation inthe process.

Figure 7 is a detail view illustrating the manner in which the basic sheets are divided following the gathering operation illustrated in Figure Figure 8 is a detail view illustrating a completed set of forms numerically arranged and consecutively numbered from 000 to 999.

Figure 9 is a view illustrating the arrangement of the numerals on basic stock sheets when it is desirable to print more than ten forms upon each sheet.

Figure 10 is a view illustrating the first and second stock sheets as printed by the process now in common use.

Referring to the drawings in detail, and wherein similar reference characters designate corresponding parts throughout the several views, the letter A may designate the basic stock cards or sheets cut to a desired size for producing a given number of symmetrical rectangular shaped forms 13. In the drawingsfthe dot and dash lines have merely been shown for clearness in describing the various stepsin theprocess, and indicates where the sheets are severed for providing the finished forms.

Referring particularly to Figures 1 to 6 inclusive, and in which the basic stock sheets have each been divided into ten equal forms, such sheets being of the. largest. size from which the largest numbers or forms can be cut as produced upon the printing press available. These stock sheets are then divided into one hundred lotsof one hundred sheets each. Each of the sheets in one lot is then printed as in Figure 2, the first form being printed with 000, the second. with 100,

and the following forms progressively increased by 100, the last or tenth form hear ing the numeral 900. As before. stated, each Sheet n he r t s t- 9i ear h nd d ets iii-m .000 u) 999.

is printed by this form. The second set of one hundred stock sheets may then each be printed as in Figure 3 with each correspondingly related form of the second set of a value of one greater than the corresponding form or the first set.

Theremaining eight sets of sheets are then printed each progressively increasing by one so that the last two sets are printed with the numerals as illustrated in Figures 4 and 5, the sheets illustrated in Figure 5represent ingthe last set of sheets.

It may here be well to state that the method pursued throughout Figures 1 to 8 inclusive, is to produce one hundred groups of consecutively numbered forms, each group containing one thousand forms nuin bered from 090 to 999.

After one hundred sets of sheets each con- 'taining one hundred sheets, have been printedas aboye described, the first gathering operation is perzt'ormed by gathering without cutting, one sheet from the top of each of the one hundred sets thus printed until a lot ofsheets (l as illustrated in Figure 6 has been attained, and as will be seen upon observing Figure 6, each form increases by one from'the top set of forms to the lowermost set. This operation is repeated one hundred times, thus providing one hundred-lots as illustrated in Figure 6.

The next process is to out each oi the lots" illustrated in Figure 6, along their dividing lines intotendistinct lots D of equal size with one set of forms to each lot such as is clearly illustrated in Figure 7.

The next step is to gather the ten small lots cut from each lot of the stock sheets into one lot E consecutively numbered as in Fig ,ure 8, the uppermost form bearing the digits 909 and the bottom form bearing the digits Repeat this operation one hundred times untilyou have one hundred groups of forms eachgroup containing forms consecutiyely numbered from 000 to 999, thus completing the process.

It will be seen that the method pursued by so arranging the numerals upon the sheets. that only eleventhousand gathering operations are necessary tor producing one hundred groups of forms each containing one hundred forms consecutively.nuinbered Summing up the gathering operation, it requires ten thousand gathering operations to produce one hundred lots as illustrated in Figure 6, and one thousand gathering operations after the severing operation in Figure 7 to produce one hundred sets ot'forms of one thousand sheets consecutively numbered as in Figure v8, tints-requiring eleven thousand gathering operations ,in all.

Reterringto the common practice of .produclng such sets-of consecut ively numbered forms, and which process is illustrated in thousand lots of one hundred finished forms each, each linishedlot containing one hundred finished forms each bearing the same numeral. Then, starting with the lot containing number 900, consecutively gather one sheet from each lot until a group of one thousand consecutively numbered terms have been gathered similar to the finished group ottormsas illustrated in Figure 8. Repeat this operation one hundred times until you have one hundred lots of consecutively numbered "form starting with 000 and ending with which completes the process.

As will be seen, it requires one hundred thousand gathering operations to complete the process by the common method.

By the process as defined in the method as pursued in Figures 1 to S inclusive, it will be seen that the number of gathering operations required for producing consecutively numl' ered terms is greatly reduced, thus materially reducingfthe cost of production.

Referring to the practice as illustrated in Figure 9, and wherein Lindicates one of the sheetsot the first group, M oneot' the sheets of the second group, and None of the sheets of the last group, it will be seen that each of the stock sheets contain twenty forms. By so arranging twenty of'the terms upon each stock sheet, providing the printing press is of a sizeto accommodate such size sheets, it will be seen that the gathering operation for providing one hundred groups of forms each consecutively numbered from 900 to 999, would be still further reduced. With a method as illustrated in'Figure 9, one hundred groups of stock sheets of fifty sheets each wouldbe required for providing one hundred groups of finished forms consecutivel y numbered from 000 to 999. With reference to the number of gathering operations required for themethod illustrated in Figure 9, only seven thousand gathering operations would be required.

It will be observed from Figure .6, and wherein the group contains one hundred sheets,that the forms progressively increase by one hundred, while in the method pursued in: Figure .9 whereineach group containsbut Ifrfty sheets, the Ifforms progressively increase by fifty. Thus it wi'llbe seen that the-terms of each sheet pro ressively increase by a number equal to the number of sheets contained in the group.

It Will also be seen that groups of sheets consecutively numbered from 000 to 100 or to ten thousand or to one hundred thousand, etc, can be produced by this process with similar advantages in the gathering operations over the common practice now in use.

From the foregoing description it will be apparent that a new and useful process of manufacturing groups of sheets containing consecutive numbers printed from type alone in a quicker and more economical manner has been provided, than is possible by the methods noW in use.

Changes in detail may be made ithout departing from the spirit of the invention or the scope of the following claims.

I claim:

1. Those steps in the method of producing a group of consecutively numbered forms printed from type alone, Which consists of first providing a group of sheets each con taining a like number of forms, printing numerals upon each form of each sheet, with the numerals upon each form of each sheet progressively increasing by the number of sheets in the group and With the correspond-- ingly disposed form of each succeeding sheet increasing by 1, disposing the sheets in progressive superposed relation in a single lot with the sheet containing the highest numbered forms lowermost, severing the lot into consecutively and progressively numbered sets offorms, and then gathering the sets of forms into a single group of consecutively numbered forms.

2. Those steps in the method of producing groups of consecutively numbered forms printed from type alone, consisting of taking a number of groups of sheets each group containing a like number of sheets, and each sheet divisible into like numbers of forms, printing numerals upon each of the forms of each sheet of one group of sheets, progressively increasing by a number equal to the number of sheets in the group, successively printing the remaining groups of sheets by increasing the value of the forms in each group by 1 with respect to their correspondingly disposed forms of the preceding group, successively gathering one sheet from the top of each group of printed sheets into separate lots or" progressively numbered sheets, severing each lot symmetrically into a number of sets of forms, and

gathering each set of forms into groups of like consecutively numbered forms.

3. Those steps in the method of producing groups of progressively numbered forms printed from type alone, consisting of providing a number of groups of sheets each group containing a like number of sheets and each sheet divisible into like numbers of forms, printing numerals of increasing value upon each form of one group, successively printing the remaining groups of sheets by increasing the value of the forms in each group With respect to the correspondingly disposed forms of the preceding group, suc cessively gathering one sheet from the top of each group of printed sheets into separate lots of progressively numbered sheets, severing each lot symmetrically into a number of sets of forms, and gathering each set of forms into groups of like progressively num-- bered forms.

4:. Those steps in the method of producing groups of consecutively numbered forms printed from type alone, consisting oi": pro viding a number of groups of sheets each sheet of each group divisible into a number of forms when multiplied by the number of sheets in the group Will form the desired number of consecutively numbered forms to be produced, printing numerals upon each.

of the forms of each group of sheets so that when first successively gathering one sheet from the top of each groupof sheets into a number of separate lots of sheets, severing each lot symmetrically into a number of sets of forms, and then gathering each set of forms into groups, groups of like consecutively numbered forms will be provided.

OVERTON l PENDERGAST.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2631845 *Jul 30, 1946Mar 17, 1953Hoe & Co RMethod of printing, folding, and cutting webs to make books
US3421752 *Sep 20, 1965Jan 14, 1969Folino Arthur SProcess of printing numbers on forms
US3822876 *May 4, 1973Jul 9, 1974Frain JProcess of making ticket packets with the tickets of each packet having consecutive and constant numbering thereon
US4188881 *Jul 28, 1977Feb 19, 1980Am International, Inc.Augmenting duplicator production
US4287824 *Apr 11, 1979Sep 8, 1981Maryland Cup CorporationMeans for imprinting multiple permutations and combinations of cards on cups
US4368665 *Dec 29, 1980Jan 18, 1983Maryland Cup CorporationMethod for imprinting multiple permutations and combinations of cards and the like on drinking cups and products manufactured thereby
US4448127 *May 28, 1982May 15, 1984Frain John JMethod of producing stacks of ticket stacks
US5020434 *Aug 14, 1990Jun 4, 1991Base Stock Press, Inc.Base stock for series checks and the like and a method or printing the same
US6155169 *Feb 12, 1999Dec 5, 2000Arrow International, Inc.Method for printing bingo books
USRE34368 *Nov 12, 1991Sep 7, 1993Arrow International, Inc.Method of producing stacks of ticket stacks
EP0598679B2Oct 18, 1993May 28, 2003Kba-Giori S.A.Method of numbering for security papers
Classifications
U.S. Classification270/1.2, 270/18, 101/72, 101/483
International ClassificationB41F17/02, B41F17/00
Cooperative ClassificationB41F17/02
European ClassificationB41F17/02