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Publication numberUS1592814 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 13, 1926
Filing dateDec 26, 1925
Priority dateDec 26, 1925
Publication numberUS 1592814 A, US 1592814A, US-A-1592814, US1592814 A, US1592814A
InventorsHarris Frank C
Original AssigneeAmerican Monoeail Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
System of overhead trackage
US 1592814 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

.Ju'ly 13, 1926. 1,592,814 1 F C HARRIS v SYSTEM OF OVERHEAD TRACKAGE Filed Dec. 26, 1925 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 fig 1 July 13, 1926.

F. c. HARRIS SYSTEM OF OVERHEAD TRACKAGE Filed Dec. 26, 1925 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Patented July 13, 1926.

UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE.

FRANK C. HARRIS, OF BRIGHTON, MASSACHUSETTS, ASSIGNOR TO THE AMERICAN MONOBQAIL COMPANY, 61" CLEVELAND, OHIO.

SYSTEM OF OVERHEAD TRACKAGE.

This invention relates to a system of overhead trackage and has for its object the production of a. simple but very effective form of track. for overhead. trolleys together with means for suspending the same.

This object is attained by the mechanism illustrated in the accompanying drawings.

Forthe purpose of. illustrating the invention, one preferred form thereof is illustrated in the drawings, this form having been found to give satisfactory and reliable results, although it is to he understood that the various instrumentalities of which the invention consists can be variously arranged and organized, and. the invention is not limited to the precise arrangement and organization of these instrumentalities as herein shown. and. described except as required by the scope of the appended claims.

Of the drawings:

F igure 1 represents a vertical sect-ion of an overhead track. system embodying the principles. of the present. invention.

Figure 2 represents a side elevation of the same.

Figure 3 represents an. elevation of one of the hangensecuring clamps.

Figure 4 represents a vertical section of same on. line 4, 4 on Fig. 3, and

Figure 5 represents a: vertical section of a modification of the overhead track system.

In the drawings, 10 is a support from which depend the hangers 1/1, each hanger having at its lower end outwardly extending projections 12 adapted to be positioned in a continuous groove 13 in the top of a monorail 14.

Each hanger 11. has formed in its sides 15, immediately beneath the bridge portion 16, openings 17' into each of which'extends one arm 18 of a U-shaped clamp 19, the other arm of which extends over a flange 20 formed upon the support 10.

The clamps 19 have holes formed therein through which extends a bolt 21 having a head 22 at one end and a nut 23' threaded to the opposite end.

By means of this bolt 21 and nut 23 the clam. s 19may be drawn towards each other to e ectually clamp'the hanger 11 to the flanges 20 oppositely disposed. on the lower end of the support 10.

The hangers 11 are made of bar metal bent to the desired. shape with the projections 12 on the lower ends, the two walls of each hanger being secured together by means of two rivets 24.

The rails 14 are made with flanges 26 extending in opposite directions from one edge while in the same ends are formed the grooves 13, the inner portions of which grooves are wider than the entrance thereto so that when the projections 12 of the hang ers 11 are inserted therein, said rails will be properly supported by said hangers when heavy loads are to be supported by the rails 14, these rails being installed in pairs, one rail 14- being suspended from the other rail.

The edge of the web of each top rail 14 is provided with a groove 27 into which is inserted the heads of a plurality of spacers or rail supporting members 28 the opposite ends of which are positioned in the groove 27 of the lower raill on the flanges 26 of which the trolley wheels 25 are adapted to move.

These spacers 28 are of considerable width and serve to truss the entire structure, giving it greater rigidity and strength, making it possible to support very heavy weights thereon.

Vdhere the monorail is used only to sup port light weights the upper rail 14: may be dispensed with and the projections 12 inserted in the groove 27 of the lower rail 14.

Near the top of the lower rail 14; its web 29 has projecting from opposite sidesthe guard flanges 30 which extend outwardly a suflicient distance to prevent the trolley wheels moving, along the flanges 26 from being engaged by any portion of the hangers 11 or other elements from which said rail is suspended.

Each rail 14 is divided vertically into two sections which overlap at the joints as indicated in the drawings and which mutually sustain and support each other preferably throughout substantially their entire longitudnal length, as by engaging each other in back to back relation, and hold each other fixedly in vertical alignment.

The web of each section of the rail 14L is providedwi-th a plurality of elongated openings or slots 31 extending lengthwise of the section and through these openings 31 are disposed a plurality of bolts 32 having nuts threaded thereto and by whch the two sections of rail are bolted together.

It will be understood by those skilled in the art that I have devised a system of suspended trackage which is free from the objectionable features of the prior art devices including the striking of the wheels against the rail supports with its attendant disadvantages, easy bending of the rail without a decrease in strength, freedom from open aligned breaks in the track at rail joints, and simplicity of construction which materially reduces the production and installation costs.

It will be understood that I may, if desired, substitute variously formed supporting members for hangers 11 and spacers 28, and particularly when the upper rail 14: is dispensed with.

If the rail 141 was made in one piece it could be bent only with great difficulty and by employing expensive machinery and yet in all installations these rails must be curved at different points to suit different conditions.

By making each rail in two sections, each section may be bent to the required curve with very little dfficulty which is a great advantage. Moreover, the bending may be accomplished easily while the rail parts are assembled in back to back engagement thereby insuring a proper bending of each part without any flattening of the outer part as may occur under similar conditions when the parts are spaced from each other as by a few filler blocks or the like. When the rail parts are to be bent while thus assembled, the bolts may be inserted in their elongated holes and the nuts screwed up thereon only sufliciently to prevent spreading of the rail parts without preventing relative longitudinal movement of the rail parts.

The elongated slots 31 provide a means whereby the bolts 32 will always pass through the openings 31 of both sections when the sections have been curved and the radius of one section is less than that of the other section.

It is obvious that if round holes were made in the sections to receive the bolts 32 these holes would be inregister when the rails were straight but would be offset when the rails were curved and the bolts could not be positioned therein to tie the two sections together.

By making the holes 31 elongated this difficulty is overcome.

On the flanges 26 adjacent the web of the rail let are shoulders 33 which serve as a guide for the trolley wheels and prevent lateral movement thereof relatively to the tread surface of said flanges 26.

By means of this construction of over-- head trackage the trolley wheels are properly guided by the shoulders 33 and the guards 30 on the monorail prevent the supporting members being struck by the wheels in their movement. The guards 30 also protect the bolts 32 from contacting with the wheels.

Moreover, the two rails placed in the same vertical plane are suitably trussed by the spacers 23, the heads of which are slightly larger than the grooves 13 and 27 so that when the two parts of the rail are fastened together the spacers 28 are clamped between them.

The whole structure in this manner is made very rigid indeed and is capable of supporting great weights.

It is believed that the operation and many advantages of the invention will be fully understood without further description.

Having thus described my invention, I claim 1. A system of overhead trackage consisting of a plurality of supports, hangers depending from said supports having outwardly extending projections at their lower ends, and a rail depending from said hangers provided with a slot extending the entire length of its upper edge to receive said hanger projections, said rail being provided with portions extending over said hanger projections and flanges beneath said hanger projections adapted to support trolley wheels.

2. A system of overhead trackage consisting of a plurality of supports, hangers depending from said supports having outwardly extending projections at their lower ends, means for clamping said hangers to said supports, and a rail provided with a slot extending the entire length of its upper edge to receive said hanger projections and provided with portions extending over said han er projections and flanges beneath said hanger projections extending in opposite directions and adapted to support trolley wheels.

3. A system of overhead trackage consisting of a plurality of supports, hangers depending from said supports having outwardly extending projections at their lower ends and holes in the opposite walls thereof immediately beneath the bridge portions thereof, U-shaped members fitting over said flanges and beneath said bridge portions, bolts connecting said U-shaped members in pairs on opposite sides of said supports, and a rail provided with a slot in its upper edge to receive said hanger projections and provided with flanges extending over said projections.

4:. A system of overhead trackage consisting of a plurality of supports, hangers depending from said supports having 'outwardly extending projections at their lower ends, members on opposite sides of said support and supported thereby provided with extensions projecting through the opposite walls of said hangers, and a rail provided with a slot in its upper edge to receive said hanger projections and provided with flanges extending over said projections.

5. A system of overhead trackae con sisting of a plurality of supports, hangers depending therefrom each consisting of a bent metal bar with its l'owerend's riveted together and provided with outwardly extending projections, and a rail provided with a slot in its upper edge to receive said projections and provided with flanges extending inwardly over said projections.

6. A system of overhead trac'kage" consisting of a plurality of supports, hangers depending therefrom each consisting of a bent metal bar with its lower ends riveted together and provided with outwardly extending projections, and a rail provided with a slot in its upper edge to receive said projections and provided with flanges extending inwardly over said projections, said rail having oppositely disposed tracks to support trolley wheels.

7 A system of overhead trackage consisting of a plurality of supports, hangers depending therefrom each consisting of a bent metal bar with its lower ends riveted together and provided with outwardly extending projections, anda rail provided with a slot in its upper edge to receive said projections and provided with flanges extending inwardly over said projections, said rail having oppositely disposed tracks to support trolley wheels and continuous guard shoulders to clear the wheels from all obstructions during their movement.

8. A system of overhead tracliage consisting of a plurality of supports, hangers depending therefrom provided at their lowor ends with outward projections, a rail having a slot at the top edge to receive said hanger projections and a similar slot in the bottom edge, a plurality of spacers having enlargements at the upper ends to fit the slot in the bottom edge of the upper rail and other enlargements at the bottom thereof, a second rail having a slot in its upper edge to receive the enlargements at the bottom of said spacers and provided at the lower edge with oppositely disposed tracks to support trolley wheels.

9. In a system of overhead trackage, a rail having a slot extending the entire length of its upper edge with the inner portion of said slot wider than the entrance thereto, said rail being provided at its lower edge with oppositely disposed wheel-supporting tracks.

10. In a system of overhead trackage, a rail having a slot extending longitudinally of its upper edge with its inner portion wider than the entrance thereto and provided atits lower edge with oppositely disposed wheel-supporting tracks, said rail being provided on opposite sides with guard shoulders limiting the inward movement of the wheels.

11. In a system of overhead trackage, a

rail having slots extending the entire length of its upper and lower edges each with itsinner portion wider than the entrance thereto and provided at its lower edge with oppositely disposed wheel-supporting tracks.

12. In a system of overhead trackage, a rail vertically divided into two parts and secured together, each part having formedin its inner face a continuous groove extending longitudinally thereof near its upper edge and provided near the bottom of its outer face with an outwardly extending wheel'- supporting track.

13. In a system of overhead trackage, a rail vertically divided into two parts and se cured together, each. part having formed in its inner face a continuous groove extending longitudinally thereof near its upper edge with a similar groove near its" lower edge and provided near the bottom of: its outer face with an outwardly extending wheel-supporting track.

14. In a system of overhead tracka ge, a rail vertically divided into two parts and having a plurality of elongated slots extending longitudinally thereof, each part having a wheel-supporting track on its outer face and a continuous groove on its inner face near the top edge, and bolts extending through said slots to lock the parts together.

15. In a system of overhead tr'ackaige, a rail vertically divided into sections each in two parts and having a plurality of elongated slots extending longitudinally thereof, each part having a wheel-supporting track on its outer face and a continuous groove on its inner face near the top edge, and bolts extending through said slots to lock the parts together with the various sections overlapping.

116. A system of overhead trackage consisting of a pair of parallel rails one of which is supported beneath the other by plurality of truss members, said. truss membeiis being clamped at opposite ends to said rai s.

17. A system of overhead trackage consisting of a pair of parallel rails one of which is suspended beneath the other, said rails having T-shaped slots in their adjacent edges, and spacers interposed between said rails and having enlarged ends disposed within said T-shaped slots.

18. A system of overhead trackage consisting of a pair of parallel rails one of which is suspended beneath the other, said rails having Tshaped slots in their adjacent edges, and spacers interposed between said rails and having enlarged ends disposed within said T-shaped slots and clamped thereto.

19. A system of overhead trackage consisting of a pair of separated parallel rails in the same vertical plane, and web members secured at one edge to the upper rail and at the other edge to the lower rail, said lower rail being provided at its lower edge with oppositely extending wheel supporting flanges and means for limiting the inward movement of said wheels.

20. In a system of suspended trackage, a rail having a central web and having. wheel supporting tracks extending laterally from the lower portion thereof, the rail being vertically divided through the web into two parts, and clamping means for supporting one part from the other and for holding the rail parts assembled in back to back contact with each other for limited relative movement with respect to each other.

21. In asystem of suspended trackage. a rail having a central web, a groove in the upper portion thereof and wheel supporting tracks extending laterally from the lower portion thereof, the rail being divided vertically through the web into two similar railparts assembled with staggered ends, rail supporting means engageable in the said groove, and holding means associated with the rail parts to maintain the said parts in engagement with each other.

22. The combination set forth in claim 21 in which the said holding means also maintain the rail parts in assembled relation with the supporting means.

23. In a system of suspended trackage, a rail formed with a central web and wheel supporting flanges extending laterally from the lower part thereof, the rail being vertically divided into two engaging parts, the parts having therebetween a recess opening at the top of the web, means to secure the parts together, and supporting means for the rail in the opening and extending above the rail.

24. The combination of the structure set forth in claim 23 together with securing means holding the rail parts in assembled relation with each other and with the said rail supporting means.

25. In a system of suspended trackage, a

rail comprising an upright web provided with wheel supporting track flanges on the lower portion thereof, and having a recess in the web with an entrance thereto through the top edge of the rail to receive a rail supporting member, the rail being split vertically through the web into two parts adapted to support each other against bending stresses throughout substantially their entire length, and means for securing the parts together for limited relative longitudinal movement including elongated openingks extending transversely through the we 26. In a system of suspended trackage, a rail comprising outwardly extending wheel supporting flanges, a web between and extending above the flanges and having a guard portion above the said flanges, and a rail supporting member engaging the rail and protected by the said guard from contact with a wheel on the said flanges.

27. The combination set forth in claim 26 in which the said guard portion is recessed with a constricted entrance extending through the top of the web.

28. The combination set forth in claim 27 in which the rail is split vertically through the web into a pluralityof rail parts adapted to be held in assembled relation with each other and with rail supporting means in said recessed portion.

29. In a system of suspended trackage, a rail comprising a central web with rail supporting flanges extending laterally on each side thereof at its lower portion and a re cessed portion at its upper edge, and a support for the rail in said recessed portion, the said recessed portion being disposed in position to protect the support from contact with the wheels on the flanges.

Signed by me at 746 Old South Bldg, Boston, Mass, this 23rd day of December,

FRANK C. HARRIS.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2442774 *Oct 19, 1944Jun 8, 1948Mccarn Burtis BIntegral trolley rail
US2577789 *Oct 19, 1944Dec 11, 1951Mccarn Burtis BHanger for trolley rails
US2947262 *Nov 3, 1954Aug 2, 1960Evans Prod CoPortable trolley track and trolley assembly
US3240217 *Nov 8, 1963Mar 15, 1966Birdair StructuresStructural assembly
US4286523 *Sep 12, 1979Sep 1, 1981Voy Manufacturing Co.System for supporting overhead trolley rail
US4305561 *Oct 5, 1978Dec 15, 1981Coal Industry (Patents) LimitedClamp
US4522000 *Apr 29, 1982Jun 11, 1985Barari Fred SEarthquake safety support for transportable building
EP0143430A2 *Nov 22, 1984Jun 5, 1985Hespe & Woelm GmbH & Co. KGSuspended rail track
EP0195988A2 *Mar 14, 1986Oct 1, 1986Walter Becker GmbHSuspended monorail, especially for the mining industry
Classifications
U.S. Classification104/111, 248/228.3
International ClassificationE01B25/24, E01B25/00
Cooperative ClassificationE01B25/24
European ClassificationE01B25/24