Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS1594477 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 3, 1926
Filing dateSep 28, 1922
Priority dateSep 28, 1922
Publication numberUS 1594477 A, US 1594477A, US-A-1594477, US1594477 A, US1594477A
InventorsKarl K Smith
Original AssigneeKarl K Smith
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Musical apparatus
US 1594477 A
Abstract  available in
Images(10)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

, y1,594,471 K. K. sMjTl-r j MUS I CAL `APPARATUS Ang; :a 1926.

' Filed Sept. 28, k1922 `1o sheets-sheet v Aug.;

..-... ..-uuu

' INVEN'roR.' fsf? 5 .l u ff 7 if mm3 1926. 1,594,471 'f n K. K.4sM|1'|-i MUSICAL APPARATUS Filed Sept. 28, 192i "1o sheets-sn't e ,Kw2 N vBY FII i I.

l ATTORNEY.:

l1 944g@ 4.]` y .ya

{a5-l v-B l Y l, ml L fsm l ll l Al, l l' 'll w Y @L -1I/e" j /371 I Al l Vl IN1. 5

'( ab) 7 mf" sy Aug. 3 1926.

K. K. SMITH MUSICAL APPARATUS Filed setjza, 1922 1o sheets-smet 9 Lnn'nnnnnnnnaY/54 MUSICAL APPARATUS Filed Sept` 28, 1922 l0 Sheets-Shet -lO Patented Aug. 3, 1926.

PATENT OFFICE.

KARL K. SMITH, OF HOUSTON, TEXAS.

MUSICAL APPARATUS.

Application led September 28, 1922. Serial No. 591,043.

This invention relates to new and useful imrovements in a musical apparatus.

ne object of theinve'ntion is to, provide an apparatus of the character described whereby different musical instruments, such as are commonly used in a band may be played by a single operator.

Another object of the invention is to provide an apparatus of the character described through which a number of wind musical instruments, as well as drums, cymbals, and the like may be simultaneously played, by a single operator, or mechanically to produce a musical effect similar to that produced whensaidinstruments are layed by individual musicians, thus procljucing ordinary band music. p A y Vl/Vith the above and other objects in view, which will be more specifically set forth hereinafter, this invention has particular relation to certain novel features of construct-ion, operation and arrangement of parts, an example of which is given in this specification and illustrated in the accompanying drawings, wherein Figure 1 is an elevational view of a complete apparatus, and which may be simultaneously played by the employment of said kapparatus in combination with said instruments.

Figure 2 shows a vertical sectional view thereof.

Figure 3 shows a plan view of a musical wind instrument in combination with an apparatus for mechanically operating the valves of the instrument.

Figure 4 shows a plan view, partly in section of the tone producing unit used in connection with each of the wind instruments employed.

Figure 5 shows an enlarged fragmentary sectional view thereof taken on the line 5&5 of Figure 4.

Figure 6 shows a transverse sectional view taken on the line 6-6 of Figure 5.

Figure 7 shows an enlarged fragmentary sectional vview taken on the line 7-7 of Figure 4.

Figure 8 shows an enlarged fragmentary sectional view taken on the line 8--8 of Figure 7. f

Figur@ L9 1.0 ,SllOW plan and end views, respectively of one form of the tone producing horn employed.

Figures 11 and 12 show plan and edge views of the tone producing reed or tongue employed with this type of horn.

Figures 13, 14 and 15 show, respectively, plan, end and longitudinal sectional views of another form of tone producing horn.

Figures 16 and 17 show, respectively, plan and edge views of the tone producing tongue employed with this last mentioned type of horn.

Figure 18 shows a front view of a complete apparatus, showing the key boards.

Figure 19 shows an enlarged fragmentary vertical sectional view taken on the line 19'-l9 of Figure 18.

Figure 2O shows an enlarged fragmentary vertical sectional view taken on the line 20-20 of Figure 18.

. Figure 21 shows an enlarged plan view of the coupling device disclosed in Figure 20.

Figures 22, 23 and 24 show plan, transverse, sectional and vertical sectional views, respectively of apedal operated mechanism, in combination with a key regulator.

Figure 25 shows a fragmentary side view of a valve controlling linger and its support.

Figure 26 shows an enlarged fragmentary vertical sectional view of the apparatus disclosed in Figure 2, showing bellows associated with the perforated music roll, for mechanically producing the music.

Figure 27 shows an enlarged fragmentary plan view thereof, partially in section.

Figure 28 shows a section of the nozzle board forming part thereof.

Figures 29 and 30 show plan and cross sectional views of a mechanical appliance through which the apparatus may be electrically operated to produce the music.

Figures 31 and 32 disclose plan and side views, respectively of a pressure gauge employed. the latter view being shown partly in section, and

Figure 33 shows a wiring diagram. l

In the drawings the numeral 1 designates a suitable casing enclosing and supporting the apparatus described. This casing may be of any desired construction and contourl and is designed to support and enclose the tone producing units 2, associated with the rlapping the e made of metal. uterals and are reeds7 nitty h le in j known as heater und 1n ore il i* l) he ree ther s pe eemmonl elefl ee but their ere pur- W Wind instruments und hereinafter ALiese units are shomi asseln eonvenien f ll as rerioue tuned ly means ot` ad 70 he and e g' horn ted nes produced w 1 ioni one of tue tone g out S and m0 39 are connected into Each slidehle throueh the justed, to,

pluralhe evln Lmili tnient of S are of :L verle re so arraneed and adnto one Ween sind l :ucl easing there ann Whose ends 1e beurinef oe ad able through jus 1S are retree ining `ers 18 are the tubes 39 each hetvro Sections connected by the L telescope thus oper ad es h of the air passage one Chambers 1S to the against the respective may 3T, and le ehnmo i they to which the brass tn ehed, is the same, ene'th as is neeesszu)v7 tion of tones of the The tubes 37 and i the Correspond ne ehmnhers 1S and a orided With a,

-`faire eesings.

is s loe-:1

ie eorrespondin i /l-l in Wh e mounted to slide,

o Yschien are l) Lt nlmninent with ehznnhers 'ods 3 r is thn tuhe L l. l

vll e tu i@ f s .3' 'Ye blocks Uone let 'eh Drees 'l er tubes 3Q, se.

i ito Wliie for t" Yhile th uosrether in le cor- :L suitehl ed i he eil With i P15'- e various units th eneh o" eht nt'rolled pose itl provid u Wit-lf tl inee. tzu

he pressu i.

erahly ei coi ce. i rl and sun soe min line l l@ leurlii o th eel Wi ality, pre into nhV nnfl are es Winti t *fa lines l ed e et "O and atv their other ne eh we lexical stein' nhodies av Dlur eil JA y l efl valve Cash li ie Casino' ing' corr-.press r[he unit ess onneet eentrall the brane :incl

2 has :i

el und 7.

vulve 42 through the 39 with the conduit N he 3^? W the n t one h the eonchrt the pressure gures ng' eontrolline pivoted n her ends rest retlnough noreueh eet the een rl* l of flach Valve i6 the hen the valve is deare ne other emi' lustrnte Q YT l nn fling' tube i the tu t eer;

IThese 1 pposite this eeotro- Each m0 geil opposite the iieh are fixed to said are Wired in multiple eetro-Inao'nets 8 throu Then any er is previoeel with a metallic plate 'formun armature 49 irren electro-magnets 50 Wl l and which itn the e r th pp ir under 1 nel o te *valve thJ n he admit other e 1 plug; 3l and enclosed Within said gli the solenoid 50 ing controlling the valve stem way et? into ts through the inst Y ye passage l tue correspond 'ate aga felt iring` the i ical w her oren conditi corresponding tube 39 and the tube 37. The free end of the tube 37 is connected into the mouth piece of a. windvinstrument through which the tune is produced. The air current passing from the tone chamber in through the horn 32 will vibrate the reed 34 originating a tone and the volume and quality of this tonewvill depend largely on the force of the air pressure as modified by the particular instrument. through which it is delivered. The pitch of the tone will depend on the length of the reed and column of air vibrated thereby and different tones requiredv to produce the music described are obtained by a proper selection of the tone chambers in which the tone is originally produced and the proper manipulation of the valves of the corresponding wind instrument. It is to be here noted that the corresponding valves 253 and 42 are manipulated in unison through a series of electrical contacts so that the branch pressure line 17 may be connected through any selected tone chamber int-o the tubing 37 and the tones of the instrument connected therewith thus varied.

Each instrument is held in position by a suitable bracket 52, and has the usual valves 53, the number of valves varying in accordance with the rangeand design of the instrument. The valves are of the usual construction and for the usual purpose, being provided to vary the tone1 produced. The valves ,53 may be depressed by means of the controllingr fingers 54 which are pivoted at one end to the casing and whose other ends are aligned over the valves 53. These fingers carry metallic plates as 55 which are alignedl over suitable electromagnets 56 each ofwhich are wired separately in the electrical circuits 57, and when the electro-magnets 56 are energized the corresponding fingers will be depressed thus operating the valves Various tones may be obtained by operating the valves 53 in suitable combinations with any one of the tone chambers 1S and these various cornbinations of the valves 53 with each of the various tone chambers 18 in turn will produce a suliicient range of tones for executing music, and of course this range may be enlarged .in scope by providing additional tone chambers 18 and connecting them with the tube 37 in the manner hereinbefore described and as illustrated in Figure 4.

In Figures 18 to 20, inclusive, I have Shown the key boards arranged in right and lett hand banks similar tothe key board of the ordinary pipe organ. The numerals 58 and 59, respectively designate the left and right hand key boards proper Whereon are mounted the keys 60 and 61 which are supported on yieldable seats as 62 and 63. These keys embody electrical switches formed with the fixed and the opposing movable contactpoints 64, 65 and 66, 67, re

spec-tively, the fixed contact points being connected to the common return 68 which is connected through the battery or other source of power 38, to a common return or ground, and movable contact point-s being connected with the electrical wiring 69 and 70, respectively. The corresponding' electromaguets Q8, 50, and are connected into the respective circuits through the electrical wiring 29, 5l and 57 so that by manipulating the keys 60 circuits may be establishedv to operate 'the valves 2Q, 4Q and 53 at the will of the operator.

The full understanding of the manner in which tones can be produced of the proper pitch to make a musical scalo can best be shown by explainingin detail the production of party of a scale. The valves which are embodied in the construction of the brass instruments of a. brass band are commonly designated as the first valve, referring to the valve closest to the mouthpiece of the instrument and farthest from the bell of the instrument which is usually manipulated by the first or index finger of the musician when playing the instrument.; the second valve referring to the middle valve of, the instrument, which is usually manipulated by the second or middle. finger of the musician when playing the instrument; and the third valve referring to the valve farthest from the mouthpiece of the instrument, and closest to the bellk of the instrument. Any tone produced in playing the instrument without manipulating the valves embodied in said instrument is known as an open tone. The valves of said" instrument are so connected with the tubing composing said instrument that when the second valve of said instrument is depressed it adds a certain amount of tubing through which the air must pass in going through the instrument and thereby lengthening the column of air which is caused to vibrate within the instrument, thereby producing the tone. The first valve of the instrument when depressed accomplishes the same result as the second valve, with the exception that the first valve when depressed adds twice the amount of tubing that the second valve adds; and the third valve, when depressed, adds an amount of tubing equal to the amount added by the first and second valves combined. Each instrument will produce several open tones of different pitches, the difference in pitch of the different tones being caused by the different frequency at which the column of air within the instrument is made to vibrate. The different pitches of the various open tones of any brass instrument of the brass band are always tones of a pitch which are known as harmonics of the fundamental tone or pitch of the instrument. The fundamental, tone or pitch of the instrument 'lll is the open tone oft the lowest pitch which the instrument Will produce. ln an instru nient so built or construc'ec1 that its fundamental tone is the musical pitch 53, the i tones, in an ascendi scale, 'will i Cilf C )7 (-LC (if Cy i re known respectively, all ot which ias hr3-1- ionies the leerer pitched o'T lunda- `4 lif e" or' the insti nnent. In producing tones or the pitches to co; cte a niusical scale, one

tone chanieers 1S is so pitched, that l reed or tongue is adiusted i e l i strun'ient attached to said g il when none of trie Valves ot said instrument are depresse( the pitch oit the so prothe same as the E ot the string or a violin, or the second E above, or et higher pitch than tle tone which is known middle C on a piano; and another or the tone chambers will have the reed which it contains so adjusted that when its Valres and HL2 are depressed and the air is forced through this tone chamber and on out through the tubing Si, and through the instrument attached to said tubin 8T, a -d none of the valves of said instri ment are depressed, the tone produced Will be the pitch knon'n as Gf being the G first above mentione l, or higher in Ditch than the E o'i the tone chamber i'irst oescrib drEhe tone chamber first described duced will be will be called tone chauiber E, and the ment. will be deiL ressed.

INT-The chamber G will be used and the second valve orc the band instrument will be depressed.

FLllfhe tone chamber G will be used and the lirst Yal'i'e ot the band instrument will be depressed.

E*'`he tone chamber E will be uscc` and none or" the 'valves of the band iniitrunient will be depressed.

BV-The b"tone chamber E will be used and the second Valve ot the instrument will be depressed.

'l`he tone chamber E will be used and the first valve of the instrument Will e depressed.

By the use of the Various other tone chambers, with and Without the depression ot the Valves or the instrument connected with the tubing 37, tones of the various pitches necessary to complete a` musical scale and the entire compass ot' the instrument may be produ ed. The 'valves ot the instrument may be depressed separately or in Various combinations 1with each other as is necessarilv to produce tones ol the pitch required.

To explain the manner in which the valves 22 and ft2 are operated either independently ot the valr 53 et the instrument or with these said -Valves et the instrument the electrical Wiring or connections necessary with the l` lvs Gl, in the keyboard 59, will be exed in detail for the production of tones fied from Gr to in a descending '.le b e same pitched tones herein- .ore )ed together with the action necessa cir production.

in ate keys (3l on the keyboard 59 g ated asthe G, Fi, F, E, anc` D keys in the order named.l

ie electrical Wire 70 running from the key is connected with the Wire G9, iown in Figure 4f., controlling through the erectie-magneto 28 and 50, the operation of he valves Q2 and l2 necessary for the operation ot that tone chamber 1S, as has pre- ,.flf been designated as tone chamber G. lilith these connections made, when the 9" keyv is depressed the Contact points 66 and GT will be brought together' and the electrical circuit completed causing the electromagnets 28 and 50 to become energized, ther-eb),Y opening the valves 22 and 4t2 allowing the air which is being held under pressure. in pressure tank l2, shown in Figure. 2, to pass through tone chamber G, and through tube 37; and through the instrument attached to said tube 37, thereb)T producing the musical tone of the pitch Gr as desired.

The el ctrical Wire 70, running from the Fi key is connected With the Wire G9, shown in Figure Il, controlling through the electro-magnets QS and 50, the operation ot the ifalves 22 and i2 necessary for the operi tion of that tone chamber 18, as has previouslf,Y been designated as tone chamber G, and also is connected with Wire, or cir- 1 cuit oi, controlling tln'ough the operation of the electro-inagnet 5G, the operation ot the second ifaire of the instrument which is connected Wit-h the tubing 37. Vith these connections made when the FS key is depressed, the Contact points G6 and 67 Will be brought together and the electrical circuit coinpletcd, causing the electro-magnets QS and 50 to become energized, therebyv allowing'the air Which is being held under pressure in pressure tank l2, shown in Figure 2, to pass through tone chamber G and through tubing 37, and through the instrument attached to said tubing 3T, and the depression of the Fi keyY bringing together contact points 66 and 67,' also causes the 1 electro-magnet 56, controlling the operation of the second valve of the instrument connected with the tubing 37, to become energized, thereby causing the depression of the second valve ot said instrument, thereby lengthening the column of air Within the instrument, and thereby producingthe musical tone of the pitch Ft as desired.

The electrical Wire running from the F key is connected with the Wire 69 shown in Figure 4, controlling through the electro-magnets 28 and 50, the operation of the valves' 22 and 42 necessary for the operation of that tone chamber 18 as has previously been designated as tone chamber G, and is also connected with the wire, ork circuit 57, controlling through the operation of the electro-magnet 56, the operation of the first valve ot' the instrument Which is connected with the tubin 37. With these connections made when tie F key is depressed, the contact points 66 and 67 will be brought together, and the electrical circuit completed causing the electro-magnets 28 and 50 to become energized, thereby allowing the air which is being held under pressure in pressure tank12, shown in Figure 2, to pass through tone chamber G, and. through tubing 37, and through the instrument attached to said tubing 37, and the depression of the F key bringing together contact points 66 and 67 also causes the electro-magnet 56 controlling the operation of ot the first valve of the instrument connected with the tubing 37 to'become energized thereby causing the depression of the first valve of said instrument, thereby lengthening the column of air Within the instrument, and thereby producing the musical tone of the pitch F as desired.

The electrical wire 70 running from the E key is connected with the Wire 69, shown in Figure 4, controlling through the electro-magnets'28 and 50, the operation of the valves 22 and 42 necessary Jfor the operation of that tone chamber 18, as has previously been designated as tone 'chamber E. lVith these connections made when the vli key is depressed the contact points 66 and 67 will be brought together and the electroenagnets 28 and 50`to become energized thereby opening the ValYes 22 and 42, and allowing the air which is being held under pressure in the pressure tank 12, shown in Figure 2, to pass through the tone chamber E, and through tubing 37, and through the instrument attached to said tubing 37 thereby producing the musical tone of the` pitch E as desired.

The electrical wire'70 running from the Di key is connected with the Wire 69, shown in Figure 4, controlling through the electro-magnets 28 and 50, the operation of the valves 22 and 42 necessary for the operation of the tone chamber 18 as has previously been designated as tone chamber E and is also connected with Wire or circuit 57, controlling through the electro-magnet 56 the operation of the second valve of the instrument which is connected with the tubing 37. With their connections made When the DIS key is depressed the contact points 66 and 67 will be brought together and the electrical circuit completed causing the electro-magnets 28 and 50 to become energized, thereby allowing the air which is being held under pressure in pressure tank 12, shown in Figure 2, to pass through tone chamber E, and through tubing 37, and through the instrument attached to said tubing 37, and the depression of the D key bringing together contact points 66 and 67 also causes the electro-magnet 56, controlling the operation of the second valve or' the instrunient attached to said tubing 37 to become 'energized thereby causing the depression of the second valve of said instrument, thereby lengthening the column of air Within the instrument, and thereby producing the musical tone of the pitch Dit, as desired.

rihe electrical Wire 70 running from the D key is connected with the Wire 69, shown in Figure 4, controlling through the electroinagnets 28 and 50, the operation of that tone chamber 18 as has previously been designated as tone chamber E,-and is also connected with Wire, or circuit 57, controlling` through the electro-magnet 56 the operation of the first valve of the instrument, which is connected with the tubing 37. lV ith these connections made, when the D key is depressed the contact pointsr 66 and 67 will be brought vtogether and thek electrical circuit completed causing the electro-magnets 28 and 50 to become energized thereby `opening the Valves 22 and 42, and allowing the air Which is being held under pressure in pressure tank 12, shown in Figure 2, to pass through tone chamber E and through tubing 37, and through the instrument attached to said tubing` 37, and the depression of the D key, bringing together contact points 66 and 67, also causes the electro-magnet 56 controlling` the operation. of the first lvalve of the instrunent attached to said tubing 37, to become energized thereby, causing the depression of the first va ve, oi said instrument, thereby lengthening the column of air Within the instrument, and thereby producing the musical tone of the pitch 'D as desired.

In like manner by the use of additional tone chambers 18, and the use of the valves embodied in the brass band instruments tones of other pitches are produced and sufficient Varied pitches are produced to include the complete range of pitch or compass of the said band instrument. The length of the column of air which is caused to vibrate is varied by the use of the valves embodied in the band instrument through which it nasses '.ihe dil'lierent frequencies at which tris said column otl air vibrates is varied by the use ot' the dille-rent tone chambers 18.

lt may often be tou-.nd desirable, where certain parts are to be played in unison, to provide a coupling device tor coupling the instruments together so that said parts an be played from the same keys. This is illusw trate/d in Figures E and 21 wherein the numeral 71 designates a long bracket anchored to the framework behind the richt, hand key board and this bracket has transverse bar 72 or insulating material iiiled thereon, and adjacent this bar lies ar row ot contact points 7 3 ot metal, forming av good conductor and each insulated -trom the otherI and connected to which are the binding` posts 7% to which the wiring 70 is also connected. A long bar 75 is located above the key board and provided with hand knobs as 76. irttached at their outer ends to the bar 7 5 and extending through the bearings in thecasing are the coupling bars 77 whose inner ends have the binding posts 7S which are connected with the wiiing7$}. The wiring is connected into the circuit ot the solenoids controlling the instruments to be coupled in. lVhen it is desired to `couple instruments together the coupling bars may be pulled outwardly, in the position shown in Figure 21, in which case the binding posts 78 will be brought into contact with the conductors 73, thus forming the coupling. lVhen torced inwardly into the position shown in Figure 20 the binding post 7 S will be carried into contact with the insulator 7 2 breaking the circuit.

In controlling two of the band instruments Ifrom the same key board the coupling device is used. rEhe knob 76 is pulled out or forward, bringing with it the bar and the coupling bars 77, and the electrical connection or binding posts 78, bring each ot their binding posts into connection with the contact point 73 which in turn is connected with the wire 70, ruiming from the key 01 directly in trent of said contact point 73. |These various binding posts are each so connected with wires ot' electrical circuits that they control the flow ot electrical current through the proper electro-magnets to produce on another band instrument, other than the one with which the keys ot the keyboard is regularly connected, a tone ot the same pitch or a tone pitched one octave, or it desired, a fractional part thereof, lower or higher in the musical scale than the. tone which is produced by the instrument with which said key is so electrically connected in circuit as to permanently control the production ot.

The basses and altos are also controlled through the foot pedals 80 which are pivotally mounted and provided with the movahle Contact points S1, 81 which oppose the lined contact points 82, 82, said contact points being connected with the electromagnets of the controlling valves QS, 50 and which control the. bass and alto instruments through a key regulator shown in detail in Figures Qi, 24 and Q5. This regulator includes bank ot key bars indicated by the numerals 83 to 9st, inclusive, respectively, having the hand knobs numbered to 106 inclusive, respectively, caen labeled to indicate the corresponding key. lllithin the casing tiere are arranged the vertical insulating bars 107 and adjacent them the vertical conducting bars 108, with the latter of H which wired to the point 8l. The regulator bars S3 to 94 respectively, each have the binding post anchors 109 to 120 inclusive, respectively carried thereby which work through suitable bearings in the casing and their inner ends carry binding posts which carry the flexible tongues designated respectively by the numerals 132 to 15:3 inclusive. rlhese tongues are preferably Li-shaped in form to embrace said bars 107 to 10S, and connected to these respective binding posts there is electric wiring forming a part et the circuit into which the electro-magnets controlling the bass and alto instruments are connected. The key desired may be selected and the corresponding key bar 'forced inwardly to complete an electrical circuit through the bars 108 and the manipulation of the foot pedals will then operate to produce the chords on the bass chords instruments in the key selected.

The manner in which this chord operating device operates the electrical circuits necessary to control and operate the C chord will be described. rlhe common C chord, as do the chords in all other musical keys, consists ot what are commonly called three changes. These changes are given bc.- low, the letters indicating the musical pitch ot the tone.

Second change: l"-rl-C.

Third change: G-B-D.

These changes as shown above are listed on an ascending scale, that is, the C is the lowest pitched tone in the iii-st change, whereas the C in the second change is the highest pitched tone in that change, and is pitched one octave higher than the C in the first change. In ordinary band music it is customary to have the bass horn produce the lowest pitched tone, and to produce the two higher pitched tones produced on the alto horns.

The toot pedals S0 will be considered iirst foot pedal, second toot pedal and third foot pedal, numbered from right to left, and will control the first. second and third changes of the musical chords. The three llO vertical conducting bars 108 on the letty will be knowny as the bass conducting bars, and the three vertical conducting bars 108 on the right will be known as the alto conducting bars. The bass conducting bars 108 will be known as first bass bar, second bass bar, and third bass bar, designated from right to left; and the flexible U-shaped tongues 132, used to embrace and engage said bars will be known as first bass engaging tongue, second bass engaging tongue, and third base engaging tongue, being opposed to the first bass bar, second bass bar, and third bass bar, respectively. The three.

vertical conducting bars on the right known as the alto conducting bars, will be known as the first also bar, second alto bar, and third alto bar, respectively, from left to right; and the liexible `Ushaped tongues 132, used to embrace and engage saidbars will be known as first alto engaging tongue, second alto engaging tongue and third alto `engaging tongue, being opposed to the first alto bar, second alto bar, and third' alto bar, respectively. That portion of the pedal that lies under the heel of the individual operating the apparatus will be designated as the heel end of the pedal, and that portion of the pedal 80 that lies under the toe of the individual operating the apparatus will be designated as the toe end of the pedal. The contact points 81 and 82 are so wired or connected into circuits that when the heel end of the first foot pedal is depressed the irsty bass bar will be thrown into circuit, when the heel end of the second foot pedal is depressed the second bass bar will be thrown into circuit, and when the heel end of the third foot pedal is depressed the third bass bar will be thrown into circuit, and when the toe end of the lirst foot pedal is depressed the first alto bar will be thrown into circuit, when the toe end of the second foot pedal is depressed the second alto bar will be thrown into circuit, and when the toe end of the third foot pedal is depressed the third alto bar will be thrown into circuit. The circuits of which these various bass and alto bars become a part upon the depression of the foot pedals will beI coinpleted through the flexible U-shaped tongues and their respective binding posts and from these said binding posts through various wires connected with the proper electromagnets 28 and 50, belonging to and kconnected with the proper units 2 to produce the tones of the pitch desired upon the in-k struments desired, and when necessary to produce the tones of the pitch desired the wires connected with these said binding posts will be connected also with electro-magnets 56 associated with the same, said 'instru ments thereby operating, as is necessary, the valves contained and carried by these said instruments. The manner in which the U-shaped tongues 132 are connected into electrical wiring is as follows:

The first bass engaging tongue 132 is connected through the binding foot to which it is attached with electrical wiring running to and connected with the proper electro-magnets, the` energizing of which will cause a tone of the musical pitch C to be produced through and by a bass brass band instrument, attached to tubing 37 leading from one of the units 2.

The second bass engaging tongue 132 is connected through the binding post to which itis attached with electrical wiring running to and connected with the proper elec- -i tro-magnets, the energizing of' which will cause a tone of the musical pitch F to be produced through and by a brass band instrument attached to tubing 37 leading from one of the units 2.

rlhe third bass engaging tongue 132 is connected through the binding post to which it is attached with electrical wiring running to and connected with theV proper electro-magnets, the energizing of which will cause a tone of the musical pitch G to be produced through and by a brass band instrument attached to tubing 87, leading :trom one of the units 2.

The first alto engaging tongue 132 is connected through the binding post to which it is attached with electrical wiring running to and connected with the proper electromagnets, the energizing of which will cause a tone of the musical pitch E to be produced through and by an alto brass band instrument attached to tubing 37, leading from one of the units 2; and the first alto engaging tongue 132 is also connected through the binding post to which it is attached with electrical wiring running to and connected with the proper electroniagnets, the energizing of which will cause a tone of the musical pitch G to be pro duced through and by another alto brass band instrument attached to tubing 37, leading from another one oi" the units The second alto engaging tongue 132 is connected through the binding post to which it is attached with electrical wiring running to and connected with the proper electro-magnets, the energizing ot' which will cause a tone of the musical pitch A to be, produced through and by an alto brass band instrument attached to tubing 37, leading from one of the units 2; and the second alto engaging tongue 132 is also connected through the binding post to which it is attached with electrical wiring running to and connected with the proper electro-magnets, the energizing of which will cause a. tone of the musical pitch C to be produced through and by another alto brass band instrument attached to tubing 87 leading from another one of the units 2.

1* 11k@ that above described for the .W olf' the chords of the musical key iL manu rod g tongue 182. is mg post to .duch

1rd 211i@ engagn h the bind conneoed throng The th' kaa Connected with the pressure tank 122, through the line 13 and its purpose is to maintain a predetermined pressure by controlling the motor which operates the aii compressor.k This gauge embodies the conventional casingv 163 enclosing any Well known type kof pressure gauge mechanism with which the hand 154 is connected.y Surrounding the casing there is a stationary rmg 165 whose outer side is formed with a gauge dial and on the inside of the casing 1 there is a rotatable ring 166 formed with spur gear teeth which are in mesh with the spur gear wheel 167 which is fixed to the stern 168. This stem works in a bearing in the margin of the rin 165 and carries the hand knob 169 by which it. may be rotated. The ring 166 carries an arcuately arranged krow of contact points 167 with which the freel end of the hand 164 contacts ysuccessively as it moves around the dial and said hand thereby Cuts resistance coils into the circuit with which the motor is connected. As the pressure increases the hand 164 moves around the dial and cuts in additional resistance coils 171 thus operating to retard the, motor and decrease the pressure. This gauge thereby serves as a pressure regulator. The dial may be adjusted, by turning the (rear wheel 167 through the hand knob 169 and the contact points 170 being connected to said dial will be correspondingly adjusted with it so that in maintaining the predetermined pressure the dial may be adjustedto the proper position so as to cut into the circuit resistance in order to maintain the desired pressure.

1. A music producing apparatus including the combination with suc-h a musical instrument as is known as a brass instrument of a brass band, of a mechanism with which said instrument is associated, said mecha-y nism including a plurality of tubes through selected ones of which columns of air vibrating at different frequencies may be in a selected sequence forced through said instrument.

2. A music producing apparatus including the combination with such a musical instrument as is known as a brass instrument of a brass band, of a mechanism with which said instrument is associated, said mechanism including a plurality of tubes through selected ones of which columns of air Vibrating at different frequencies may be in a selected sequence forced through said instrument, and selective means through which the desired tubes may be selected.

3. A music producing apparatus including the combination with such a musical instrument as is known as a brass instrument of a brass band, of a mechanism with which said instrument is associated, said mechanism including a plurality of .tubes through selected ones of which columns of air vibrating at different frequencies may be in a selected sequence forced through said instrument, electrical selective means, and switches operated manually, controlling said electrical selective means through which the desired tubes may be selected through ysaid selective means.

`a selected sequence forced through said instrument, electrical selective means, and mechanically operated electrical switches through which the desired tubes may be selected through said selective means.

5. A music producing apparatus including the combination with such a musical instrument as is known as a brass instrument of a brass band, of a mechanism with which said instrument is associated, said mechanismL including a plurality of tubes through selected ones of which columns of air vibrating at different frequencies may be in a. selected sequence forced through said instrument, a vibratory element within each tube which is vibrated by and in turn imparts vibration to said column.

6. A music producing apparatus including the combination with such a musical instrument as is known as a brass instrument of a brass band, of a mechanism with which said instrument is associated, said mechanism including a plurality of tubes through selected ones of which columns of air vibrating at different frequencies may be in a selected sequence forcedthrough said instrument, and selective means through which the desired tubes may be selected, a vibratory element within each tube 4which is vibrated by and in turn imparts vibration to said column of air.

7. A music producing aparatus including the combination with such a musical instrument as is rnown as a brass instrument of a brass band, of a mechanism with which said instrument is associated, said mechanism including a plurality of tubes through selected ones of which columns of air vibrating at different frequencies may be in a selected sequence forced through said instrument, electrical selective means, and electrical switches operated manually thereby controlling said electrical selective means through which the desired tubes may be selected through said selective means, a vibratory element within each tube which is vibrated by and in turn imparts vibration to said @01eme of air,

8. il music producine' apparatus including the combination With such a musical instrument as is known as a brass instrument ot a brass band, of a. mechanism With which said instrument is associated, said mechanism including a plurality 't' tubes through selectedL ones of which columns oit air vibrating at different frequencies may be in a selected sequence forced through said instrument, electrical selective means, and mechanically operated electrical switches through which the desired tubes may be selected through said selective means` a yibratory element within each tube Which is `vibrated by and in turn imparts vibration to said column of air.

9. fr music producingapparatus includina the combination with suon a. musical instrument as is known as a brass instrument of a brass band, of a mechanism with which said instrument is associated, said mechanism including a plurality oi: tubes through selected ones `oi' which columns ot air yibratiA Q' at ditfcrent frequencies may be in a selected sequence forced through said instrument. a Vibratory clement Within each tube which is yibrated by and in turn imparts vibration to said column ot air, and ineans for manipulating the valves carried by said instrument for the purpose of varying the length ot said column ot air.

l0. A music producing` apparatus including the combination with such a musical instrun'ient as is known a brass instrument ot a brass band, ot a inechzirr ism with which said instrument is associated, said mechanism includinga plurality of tubes through selected ones ot' which columns oi' air vibrating at different frequencies may be in a selected sequence forced through said instrument. a vibratory element within each tube which is yibrated by and in turn imparts vibration to said column of air. and means for manipulating the valves embodied in said instrument for the purpose ot' Varying the length of said column of air, and electrically operated means for controlling said valves.

ll. A music producing apparatus including the combination with such a musical instrument as is known as a brass instrument o a brass band, oi a mechanism with which said instrument is associated, said mechanism including a plurality of tubes through selected ones oi' which columns of air vibrating at ditierent frequencies may be in a selected. sequence i'orced through said instrument, a ribratory element Within each tube which is ribrated by and in turn imparts vibration to said column of air, and means lor inanipulating` the valves embodied in said instrument for the purpose oit varying the length of said column of air, electrically operated means 't'or controlling said valves, and switches operated manually tor controllingT said electrically operated ieans.

l2. A music producing apparatus including the combination with such a musical instrument as is lrnoirn as a brass instrument of a brass band, of a mechanism with which said ii'istriuncnt is associated, said mechanism including a plurality of tubes through selected ones ot which columns o't air vibrating at different frequencies may be in a selected sequence forced through said instrument, a ribratory element Within each tube which is Vibrated by and in turn imparts \f*ibration to said column of air, and means for manipulating the Valves embodied in said instrument for thepurpose oit varying the length oil said column ot air, electrically operated means for controlling said Yaltes, and mechanically operated switches tor controlling said electrically operated means.

ln testimony whereof I have signed my name to this specification.

KARL K, SMITH.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5142961 *Nov 7, 1989Sep 1, 1992Fred ParoutaudMethod and apparatus for stimulation of acoustic musical instruments
US5233897 *Mar 5, 1991Aug 10, 1993Wicks Organ CompanyOrgan reed pipe shallot
WO1991006941A1 *Nov 6, 1990May 16, 1991Fred ParoutaudMethod and apparatus for stimulation of acoustic musical instruments
Classifications
U.S. Classification84/83, 84/3
International ClassificationG10F1/00
Cooperative ClassificationG10F1/00
European ClassificationG10F1/00