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Publication numberUS1595673 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 10, 1926
Filing dateMar 25, 1926
Priority dateMar 25, 1926
Publication numberUS 1595673 A, US 1595673A, US-A-1595673, US1595673 A, US1595673A
InventorsGottlieb R Magney, William E Nelson
Original AssigneeNelson
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method of and means for constructing walls and partitions
US 1595673 A
Abstract  available in
Images(5)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Aug.l 10, 192e.

G. R. MAGNEY ET AL METHOD oF AND MEANS FOR coNsTRUcTING wALLs AND PARTITIONS Filed March 25, 1926 5 Sheets-Shet l Nm/m25@ Q A ....a.. o

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METHOD 0F AND MEANS FOR CONSTRUCTING WALLS AND PARTITIONS G. R. MAGNEY ET AL Fildmaroh 25, 192e 5 sheets-sheet 2 frz van of? fi @TTL ,IE5 RMAGNEY Z441. MM E A/EL. 50N

Aug. 10 1926. 1,595,673

G. R. MAGNEY er Al.

METHOD oF AND MEANS FOR coNsTRUcTlNG wALps AND PARTIToNs Filed March 25, 1926 5 Sheets-Sheet S mm mw Hai/0 n Y bal/07125102 GTTL/:BRMAGNEY WILL/AMEA/LSON BDCWL Mib/Mum,

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5 Sheets-Sheet 4 Inl/enfer A 6oT1'L/EBRMA6NEY` G. R. MAGNEY ET AL Fiied March 2,5, 19

3 WML/,4M E NELSON @WiWi/Wim l TTORNEYS METHOD OF AND MEANS FORVCQNSTRUCTING WALLS AND PARTITIONS lV/IVl/f/f/IW x Aug. 10,1926. v1,595,673 A G. R. MAGNEY ET AL METHOD OF AND MEANS FOR CONSTRUCTING -WALLS AND PARTITIONS Filed March 25, 1926 Y j Sheets-Sheet ATTORNEYS Patented Au'g. l0, 1926. v

UNITED STATI-:s

GOTTLmB R. MAGNEY AND WILLIAM E. NELSON, OF lMINNEAPOLIS,MINNESOTA;

MAGNEY ASSIGNOB TO SAID NELSON.

METHOD OF AND MEANS FOB CONSTBUCTING WALLS AND PARTITIONS.

Application led March 25, 1928. Serial No. 97,288.

This invention relates to an improved method of and means for constructing building walls and partitions, whereby the usual wall studding and also the usual wooden or expanded metal lath, commonly employed to support the plaster, may be dispensed with, thereby greatly simplifying the construction of the walls 'and partitions with a resultant decrease in the cost thereof.

An object of the invention is to provide a method of and means for erecting building walls and partitions of flexible or semilexible sheet insulating material, and plaster, the sheet insulating material preferablyvbeing composed of layers of dry felt united by means of a viscous water-proof` coating such as tar or asphalt, and the outer surfaces of the felt layers being treated with a similar coating to render the fabricated sheet water-proof, in a manner whereby said outer surfaces will receive and Ahold the plaster, when applied thereto.

-A further object of the invention is to provide sheets having an overall length relatively shorter lthan thel distance between the xed supporting members to which they are to be secured, whereby the sheets may be suitably stretched and tensioned to prevent them from bulging or swaying when plaster is applied to the surfaces thereof.

A, further object is to provide means for reinforcing the edges of the sheets whereby they may be secured to the supporting members and suitably tensioned without danger of injuring or tearing the edges thereof.

Other objects of the invention are: (l) to produce a wall structure of comparatively small cross-section without strength or rigidity, thereby increasing the effective Hoor space of a given size building as Vcompared-with the present method of wall construction; (2) to produce a wall structure which will be non-conductive to heat and cold; (3) will be substantially sound-proof and ire resisting, and (4) will also be moisture and vermin-proof. In this manner I will provide a wall structure well v adapted for general use in the building art.

Other objects of the invention will appear from the following description and the accompanying drawings and will be pointed out in the annexed claims.

In the accompanying drawings forming a part of this specification,

Figure l is a perspective view illustratsacrifi'cing ing the flexible insulatin .sheets arranged and-stretched between, an secured to, fixed nailing thereto base boards, picture mould- 4igure 3 is an enlarged sectional plan view on the line 3-3 of Figure 2 showing a plastered wall and a finished door open- 1n igure 4 is a similar View showing a crosswall construction.

Figure 5 is a perspective view illustrating vtwo walls joined together.

A Figure 6 is a detail view illustrating sheets cut shorter than the distance between supporting members to which they are secured, whereby the sheets may be stretched and tensioned to prevent bulging.

Figure 7 is an enlarged detail view showing one of the sheet-reinforcing angles removed from the sheet.

Figure 8 is an enlarged detail section showing the lpreferred manner of securing reinforcing angles to the ends of thesheets, and also angles nailed to the fixed supporting members.

Figure 9 is a similar View illustrating the reinforcing angles provided with vintegral holding lugs adapted to pierce the sheet to prevent slipping.

Figure 10 is a lview illustrating the use of a flat bar or strap in connection with an angle bar to grip the sheet, bolts also being shown in place of the split rivets shown in 'Figures 8 and 9.

Figure 11 is a view illustrating the contiguous edges of the sheets secured together by means of a suitable strip of material, such means being employed when the sheets are not flanged for lap joints.

Figure 12 is a sectional elevation illustrating a plurality of sheets arranged in spaced relation to provide dead air spaces in the wall.

Figurev 13 is a horizontal section on the line 13--13 of Figure 12 showing sheets' spaced lapart by the use of small channel bars.

- Figure 14, is a view illustrating a wall conmiv lower joists above mentioned struction' com rising two insulating sheets spaced apart y means of blocks.

In the selected embodiment of the inven- ,tionf ere shown, there is illustrated in Figuref' a portion of a building comprising the usual jolsts 15 and floor boards 16 secured to the main floor -joists 17. The upper-and rovlde -the supporting 4member's or means or sup ortng the sheets which are interposed t ere- -between as will subsequently be described.

The iexible, or semi-flexible insulating sheets 18 used in the construction of this novel wall, are preferably constructed of 'layers of dry felt or paper united by means of aI viscous water-proof material, such as tar or asphalt, after which the outer surfaces of the sheets are coated with a similar water-proofing material. The preferable construction of these sheets is shown in the prior pending application of William E.

Nelson and Thomas B. Hennessey, Serial Number 92,541, filed March 5, 1926.

In the construction of building walls, and particularly inside partitions, it is desirable that the thickness or cross section of the walls and partitions be mantained as small as possible in order to rovide more floor space in the building. T e novel method of constructing' walls and partitions as set Vthe sheet 18, as shown, thereby preventingthe angles from moving or slipping upon :45' lthe sheet when the sheets are stretched and put under tension.v Both webs of the reinforcing angles 19 are preferably symmetri- `cal, and are provided with the lugs 22 and apertures 23 whereby they may be furnished in long len'gths and cut to suit the widths of the sheets with which they are to be used. The apertures 23 are preferably spaced to coincide with the usual spacing .of thev joists so that the nails 24, used in securing the angles to the upper and lower supportin members, may be driven into the joists as s own.

An important feature of this invention resides in the cutting or sizing of the sheets 18 before being secured to the-upper and lower supporting members or joists. As shown in Figures 1 and 6, the sheets are cut to a ,length that is shorter than the distance or spacing between the supporting members 15 and 16. Thus when the sheet is interv posed between two. supporting members,

` construction of the sheet.

gaps 26 and 27 will be provided at theA endl thereof, thereby permitting the sheet to be stretched and tensioned to prevent bulging and swaying when plaster is ap lied to the surfaces thereof. I preferred t e g'ap may be arran'ged atone end of the sheet only. In mounting a sheet, the upper end is preferably first secured to the jolsts 15 by means of ordinary nails1 or spikes 24. The sheet is then raised to a height sufficient to prov1de the gap 27 between the lower end of the sheet and the supporting membr 16, after which the sheet 1s vertically aligned by means of th'e nails.

Referring to Figure 6 it will be seen that 1f the upper right hand nail 24 is driven deeper into the member 15, the lower end of the sheet 18 will be swung to the right, While if the nail at the upper left hand corner is driven farther into the member 15, the lower endV of the sheet will be swung or adjusted to the left. Thus vthe upper nails 24 provide means for vertically aligning the sheet with reference to adjoining walls or door openings. The lower en d of the sheet 18 is similarly secured to the supporting member or floor 16 by means of nails 24 after which the sheet may be stretched and tensioned to the desired degree by driving the ails into the supporting members 15 and 16 as may be required.

All of the sheets are preferably mounted in the same manner, and each sheet is prefj erably provided with projecting fianges 33 adapted to overlap the similar fianges of adjoining contiguous sheets, as particularly shown in Figures 4 and 5. i

The anges 33 of adjacent sheets are preferably united by means of a coat of asphalt or tar similar to that used in the Thus when all of the sheets in the .construction of a wall have been mounted and their adjacent edges united as above described, the plurality of sheets will form in effect, a single sheet having its upper and lower edges secured to the supporting members or joists 15 and- 17. By mounting the sheets as above described they may be stretched and suiiciently tensioned to prevent them frombulging or swaying when laster is applied to-the exposed surfaces t ereof.

Figures 4 and 5 illustrate plaster 30-applied to the opposite surfaces of the insulating sheets to finish the wall. Figure 5 also illustrates one wall joined to another preferably by securing together the sheets 18 of the two walls by means of the same angle bars 19, that secure the upper and lower ends of sheets to the supporting members, as hereinbefore described. Figure 4 illustrates a main wall or partition having two branch walls secured thereto. by means of the angles 19. as shown and described with reference to Figure 5. The edge 34 of the manera y sheet 18, adjacent the solid or main wall 35,

may be secured thereto by means of' nails 36 driven into the wall at opposite sides of l vthe sheet 18 as shown. Small angles (not shown) may also be used' for securing the edge 34 to the wall 35 in placev of the nails Figure 2 illustrates a partially completed I wall structure with door andwindow openings provided in the wall after the insulateets 18 have been secured to the supporting members. Before the Adoor and window openings'are cut in the insulating sheets, the wall is preferably constructed as shown in Figure 1, after which furring strips or grounds 37 may be nailed to opposite sides of the sheets to define the door and window openings;

or grounds are preferably of a thickness substantially equal to the thickness of the plaster when the wall is finished, so that their outer surfaces will be substantially flush with the surfaces of the'plaster, as .particularly shown in Figure 3. Angle bars 38, similar. to those provided for securing the upper and lower ends of the sheets to the supporting members 15 and 16, may also be secured to the upper portions of the vertical furring strips or grounds 37 to reinforce the wall adjacent to the door openings. suchy angles preferably extending upwardly to the angles 19 securing the upper ends of the sheets to the supporting member; or joists 15. The angles 38 are also preferably secured tothe sheets by passing nails or rivets through aligned apertures 23 provided in the angles. This figure also illustrates nailing strips or blocks 39 secured to the lower portions of the sheets to provide means for nailing the usual base boards 41 to the wall, shown at the right hand sideV -of Figure 2. These nailing strips may be arranged as shown at the left hand side of Figure 3.v or if desired, they may be staggered as shown in Figure 4. N ailing blocks 42 may be similarly secured to the upper portions of thel sheets 18 to provide means for nailing the usual picture moulding 43 to the wall, After the furring strips and nailing blocks have thus been secured to the sheets 18, plaster is applied tothe surfaces thereof to complete thewall to the thickness` vto the wall as shown. The use of the fur- These furring strips4 ring strips or grounds 37 provide means whereby the casings and jambsmay be secured to the wall in the usual manner. A door 40 is shown mounted in the opening.

Figure 11 'illustrates how the contiguous edges of two adjoining sheets may be joined together by means of` a strip 47, preferably of similar-l material, extending the full length of the sheets. This strip may be secured to the sheets by means of asphalt to securely unite the two sheets.

Figure 12 illustrates a wall structure comprising a plurality of insulating sheets 18, preferably three, arranged in spaced relation to provide dead air spaces 48 within the wall. The sheets 18 are preferably yspaced apart by means of channel bars 49 as partie-- ularly shown in Figure 13. The sheets are preferably secured to the channels by means of wires 51 passing through the intermediate sheet and around the channels as shown.

small rodl 52 is preferably provided upon the opposite side of the sheet around which the wire 51 is passed, thereby preventing the wire from tearing through the sheetl when securing the :hannel 49 thereto.

channels 49 are preferably arranged in stagy gered relation asshown in Figure 13.

The type of wall abofve described is particularly well adapted forl use in music halls and studios, as it is practically impossible for sound to pass through the wall, thereby providing a wall which will be substantially 'soundproof` The sheets 18 are secured to the upper and lower supporting members 15 and 16 in av manner similar to that shown and described with reference to y Figures 2 and 6. When three sheets are arranged in spaced relation as shown in Figure 12, the two outer sheets are preferably provided with one 'angle 19,at each end only, straps 53 being provided upon the inside surfaces of the two outer sheets as shown in Figure 12 4,and particularly in Figure 10. Sheets of insulating material 54 and 55, which may be -similar to that from which the sheets are made, are pref- `erably interposed between the angles 19 and the supporting members 15 and 16 as shown in Figure 12, in order to insulate the upper and lower portions of the wall from -the supporting members.

' Figure 14 illustrates another form of wall structure wherein but two sheets are employed to provide a single. dead'air space 56 within the wall. Spacing blocks 57 may be provided to space apart the two sheets 18 in place of the channels shown in Figure 13. Referring to Figure 10 `it will also be noted that,- if desired, bolts 58 may be employed to secure the reinforcing angles 19 and the strips 53 to the sheets 18 in place of the split rivets 21 shown in the other l figures.v

Figures 1 and 2 illustrate similar plaster holding boards or sheets 18a secured to the ceiling joist-s 15 to support the plaster, 1nstead of wood or expanded metal lath. 'hen the sheets 18a are thus used in the construction of ceilings or horizontal walls,

they are preferably nailed to the joists before the ,walls and partitions are erected. In the drawings we have also shown .the use of nails or spikes for securing the sheets to the upper and lower supporting members. It is to bc understood, however, that other devices may be used 'for this purposesuch, for instance, as screws. Also if thevlower support to which the sheets are to be se cured is constructed of masonry, expansion sleeves or anchors may be embedded therein adapted to secure'bolts or screws passing through the apertures 23 provided in the webs of the reinforcing angles 19. We use the term wall to include inside or outside vertical partitions or walls, horizontal walls or ceilings, or walls placed at any desired angles.

lVe claim as our invention:

1. The method of constructing walls and partitions of flexible sheet material and plaster which consists in securing between spaced supporting members flexible insulating sheets, then tensioning said sheets between said members to prevent bulging and swaying and applying plaster to the sheet surface.

2. The method of constructing walls and partitions of flexible sheet material and plaster which consists in attaching the sheets at their edges to supports arranged between spaced supporting members, securing said supports to the supporting members and then tensioning the sheets to prevent them from bulging or swaying, and applying plaster to the surface of the sheets.

3. The method of constructing walls and partitions of flexible sheet material and plaster which consists in coating the sheets with aspiialt,farranging the coated sheets between spaced supporting members, secur ing said sheets to the supporting members under tension to prevent the sheets from bulging or swaying and applying plaster to the asphalt coated sheet surface. l

4. The method of constructing walls and partitions of flexible sheet material and plaster which consists in arranging between spaced supporting members flexible sheets of heat and sound insulating material, securing said sheets between said members under tension, then adjusting the tension to prevent bulging and swaying of the sheets and applying plaster to the sheet surface.

5.l The method of constructing walls and partitions of flexible sheet material and plaster `which consists in coating both sides of the sheets with heat and sound insulat- -ing material, arranging the coated sheets between spaced supporting members, securing saidl sheets between said members under ing plaster to bot ifsurfaces of the sheet. 6,'The method of constructing walls and partitions of flexible sheet material .and

plaster which consists in arrangin lbetweeni spaced supportin of heat and sound insulating. material that are shorter than the space between said supporting members, then securing said sheets between said members under tension to prevent bulging or swaying andapplying plaster to the sheet surface.

7. The method of constructing walls and 4partitions of flexible sheet material and plaster, which consists in arran ing between spaced supporting members, exible sheets of insulating materlal that lare cut relatively shorter than the spacing between said supporting members, tensioning said sheets between said members to prevent bulging and swaying, attaching together thegedges" of contiguous sheets, and applying plaster to the sheet surface. f

8. The method of constructingwalls and partitions of flexible sheet material vandl plasterwhich consists in arranging between spaced supporting members a pluralityy of exible sheets of heat and sound insulating material arranged with air spaces' between them, then tensioning said sheets between said members to prevent bulging and swaying, and applying plaster to the outer surfaces of the outer sheets. l

9. The combination, in a wall structure with spaced supporting members, of a sheet of flexible heat and sound insulating mateL rial mounted kbetween said members and having surface coatings of asphalt, means for securing and adjustably tensioning said sheets between said supports, and plaster applied to the asphalt coatings of said sheet.

10. Thecombination, in a ,wall structure, with spaced" supporting members, of a sheet of exible heat and sound insulating mate rial mounted between said members and having surfacecoatings of asphalt, means for securing said sheets under tension between said supports, and plaster applied' to both surfaces of said sheet against said asphalt coating.

11. The combination with fixed support4 ing members, of a sheet of flexible insulatingy material mounted between said members, the length of said sheet being less than the space between said members, means ad-v members. flexi leY sheets justably supporting said sheet under ten-` .Y

sion between said members and plaster ap plied t0 theJ opposite surfaces of said sheet.

12. The combination with spaced supporting members, of a sheet of flexible in'- sulating material mounted lbetween said members, reinforcing means marginally cured to the end portions of said sheet,

means adjustably securing said sheet under tension, and through said reinforcing means, to said supports, and plaster applied to the opposite surfaces of said sheet.

13. The combination, in a wall structure, of` plaster supporting means comprising in combination spaced supportingmembers, a sheet of flexible insulating material mounted between said members under tension and an 14. The combination in a wall structure members, and arranged with air spaces bel tween said sheets, and asphalt coatings applied to the outer surfaces of the outer sheets to provide means for bonding plaster to said Inwitness whereof, we have hereunto set our hands this 19th day of March, 1926.

GOTTLIEB R. MAGNEY. WILLIAM E. NELSON.l

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2618028 *Jul 2, 1946Nov 18, 1952United States Gypsum CoPanel type laminated wallboard partition
US3256663 *Apr 17, 1962Jun 21, 1966Bishop Robert HInsulated wall
US3686809 *Jan 30, 1970Aug 29, 1972Lindal Skuli WalterReinforced wood floor sections
US3983672 *Nov 21, 1973Oct 5, 1976Dietrich Richard JWall
US4505085 *Dec 3, 1982Mar 19, 1985Oliver Wayne HSplit panel assembly
US4598516 *Mar 1, 1985Jul 8, 1986Groshong Frank ECeiling finish joint for dry wall partitions and method of making same
US4899509 *May 21, 1987Feb 13, 1990Interior Creators, Inc.Head track system and method
Classifications
U.S. Classification52/356, 52/240, 52/347, 52/348
International ClassificationE04B2/84, E04B2/72
Cooperative ClassificationE04B2/842, E04B2/723
European ClassificationE04B2/84P