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Publication numberUS1596600 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 17, 1926
Filing dateDec 27, 1923
Priority dateDec 27, 1923
Publication numberUS 1596600 A, US 1596600A, US-A-1596600, US1596600 A, US1596600A
InventorsDickson Virgil C
Original AssigneeDickson Virgil C
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Athletic shoe
US 1596600 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Aug. f

V. C. DICKSON ATHLETIC Filed Dec. 27/1923 'Patented Aug. 17, 1926.

. 1,596,600 PATENT OFFICE.

VIRGIL G. DICKSON, OF OWASSO, OKLAHOMA.

Y ATHLETIC SHOE.

Application filed December 27, 1928. Serial N'o. eaaosa.

This invention relates to shoes and particularly to those shoes worn by athletes.

Great difficulty has been experienced, in the past, in securing cleats, to athletic shoes, which would stand the hard usage required of them under varied weather conditions without breaking loose from the shoe and while still retaining the shoes flexibility.

The primary purpose of the present invention is the provision of an improved athletic shoe, the cleats of which will not become loosened under the varied wet and dry conditions and which will retain the shape and resiliency of its sole.

Another object of my invention is they provision of an athletic shoe having a cleatcarrying resilient inter or intra sole and an outer sole having openings for the cleats to protrude therethrough. I

Another and further object of my invention is the provision of a shoe having an inter sole, and cleats integral therewith ex tending through the outer sole and having means attached to the respective cleats for holding the edges of the openings m place.

Referring to the drawing wherein I have illustrated an embodiment ofvm-y -invention,

Fig. 1 illustrates a cross section of my invention on the line 1-1 of Fig. 2, but showing a part of the upper, in elevation,

-Fig. 2 is a bottom plan view of the c0n 1-- pleted shoe, showing one of the cleats 1n.

cross section,

Fig. 3 is a'bottom plan view of the shoe with the inter sole in position and before.

the outer sole is in place.

Fig. 4 is afragmental cross-sectional view.

on the line 44 of Fig. 2.

Fig. 5 is a side elevation of the inter sole Which carries the cleats and Fig. 6 is a plan view of the outer sole showing the openings through which the cleats pass when-the outer sole is applied.

Throughout the several figures, the same. reference characters refer to the same or similar parts.

10 designates the upper of the shoe constructed according to my invention. The upper part of the shoe inner sole and welt portion are constructed in a well known manner the details of which form no part of the present invention.

Below the inner sole and welt 11, is an inter sole 12 which is preferably constructed of resilient metal having weakened portions as by cutting out portions 13 and 14, thus leaving narrow stri s 15, 16 in the middle portion or shank o the shoe, and narrow strips 17 18 near the toe to permit the latter to bend during use. This inter sole portion preferably extends substantially the cated at 19 on the heel portion of the inter sole and at 20 on the forward portion.

The inter sole '12 is attached to the inner solo by means of rivets 21, six in number be- 1ng shown, two at the heel end, two at the toe and two under the ball of the foot. The rivet is placed with its head against the inter sole and a washer 22 through which the rivet stem is placed, is located within the shoe. After the rivets are in place, their ends are upset to hold the inter sole in place.

The outer contour of the inter sole is slightly smaller than the inner sole for a purpose to be described. The inter sole is provided with narrow slots 23, 24; adjacent the toe, slots25, 26 adjacent the outer edges at the ball of the shoe and slots 27, 28 adjacent the heel for a purpose tobe later set forth.

An outer Solo 30 shown in Fig. 6 is made of the same size and shape .as the inner sole 11. This outer sole is provided with openings 19, 20 of .the same size and shape as the cross-section of the cleat bodies at the points where they are J'oinedto the inter sole. These openings are positioned so that they will register with the correspondin cleat bodies when the outer sole is applie A suitable material for the outer sole has been found to be rubber or a substitute therefor.

After the outer sole is in place, the inner, inter and outer soles are secured together by stitching a line of stitching around the shoe adjacent the edge thereof in the usual Before the outer sole is ap- .plied, it may be, if desired, coated with a suitable water proof cement as iswell' known in the art of shoe making.

After the outer sole is in place, the cleat bodies are provided with Wearmg portlons which serve to hold the outer sole, ad acent the cleat bodies, in place and at the same time provide ground contacting surfaces which are of a yielding nature and may be replaced when worn or broken.

In the embodiment illustrated, I prefer to make the wearing portions of-three parts. A collar 40 of hard wood, or other suitable material is provided as shown in Fig. 4. This collar 40 has an opening centrally located to receive the cleat body 19 or 20 as the case may be. Holes are drilled through the collar portion and cleat bodyportion to provide for rivetlng the former to the latter, counter sunk holes belng provided for the rivet heads. Before the collar portions are applied to the body portions of the cleat b0 g, a suitable water proof cement is prefera 1 applied to seal the joint between the cleat body and the collar.

The collar 40 does not cover the lower end of the cleat body. A suitable thimble having a hollowed-out ortion, to receive the end of the cleat bo y, is provided. This thimble may be, as shown, constructed of two complementary portions 41, 41? which go on opposite sides and are riveted 1n place in a manner described for the collar 40. Similarly as in the case of the collars, a suitable water proof cement may be appl ed to the inside portions of the thimble to seal the joints against the entry of moisture.

In use, a shoe constructed according to m invention, provides a maximum amount o comfort. The encounter of a cleat with a stone or other hard substance does not bring a pressure on only one part of the foot, the strains being distributed by reason of the rigid connection of the cleat body to the inter sole. On the other hand, because of the flexible construction of the inter sole, the freedom of action of the foot is maintained.

After hard usage, the thimbles 41, 41, collars 40, outer soles 30 or inter soles 12 may be replaced as may be necessary.

While I have illustrated and described in detail an embodiment of my invention, I desire to have it understood that the showing is merely illustrative and that modifications and changes may be made without departing from the spirit of my invention and within the scope of the appended claims.

Having described my invention what I claim and desire to secure by Letters Pate ent is 1. An athletic shoe having an upper por-- tion and a sole portion, the sole portion comprising an outer sole, an inner sole and an inter metallic sole, and cleats having body portions integral with the inter sole and extending through the outer sole, and having ground en aging portions enveloping the portions of t e cleats below the outer sole and also having means for non-rotatably securing the body portions and their respective ground on aging portions together.

2. A11 at letic s 0e having an upper portion and a sole portion, the sole portion comprising an outer sole, an inner sole and an inter metallic sole, and cleats having body portions integral with the inter sole and extending through the outer sole, and having ground engaging portions enveloping the portions of the cleats below the outer sole and also having rivet means extending through the body portions and ground engaging portions to hold the latter in place.

3. An athletic shoe having an inner sole, an outer sole, an inter sole extending over the shank of the shoe and between the outer and inner soles and having a cut out weakened portion adjacent the shank to provide flexibity, cleats having portions rigidly attached to the inter sole and having ground engaging portions below the surface of the outer sole'and having means passing through the weakened portion for securing the outer, inner and inter soles together.

4. An athletic shoe having an inner sole, an outer sole, an inter sole between the outer and inner soles and having a weakened portion adjacent the shank and another weakened portion between the ball of the shoe and the toe, said weakened portions providing flexibility, cleats having portions rigidly attached to the inter sole and having ground surface of the outer sole.

5. An athletic shoe havin an upper portion and a sole portion, t e sole portion comprising a resihent metallic strip extending from the heel portion over the shank to the toe rtion of the shoe, the strip having cleat ody portions integrally attached thereto and extending therefrom and a weakened portion intermediate the ends and permitting bending of the shoe when in use.

6. An athletic shoe having an inner sole, an outer sole, an inter sole between the outer and inner soles, cleats having portions rigidly attached to the inter sole and extending through and beyond the outer sole and including means engaging the portion extending through the outer sole and beari against the latter to hold it in place.

An athletic shoe having an inner sole, an outer sole, an inter sole between the outer and inner soles, cleats having portions integrally attached to the inter sole and extending through the outer sole and having wearing portions attached to and covering this portion extending through the outer so e.

8. An athletic shoe having an inner sole,

an outer sole, an inter sole between the outengaging portions below the er and inner soles and having cleat body portions rigid therewith and having a cut away portion through the body of the inter sole adjacent the shank of the shoe to form an opening, and means passing through said opening, to secure the outer sole to the inner sole.

9. An athletic shoe having an inner sole, an outer sole, an inter sole between the outer and inner soles and having cleat body portions rigid therewith and having a cut away portion through its body portion adjacent the shank of the shoe and stitching passing through the outer and inner soles and the opening in the inter-sole to hold the outer, inter and inner soles together.

10. An athletic shoe having an inner sole, an outer sole, an inter sole between the outer and inner soles and having cleat body portions rigid therewith, the inter sole being provided with perforations at intervals and stitching passing through the inner and outer soles and through the perforations in the inter sole to hold the inter sole, the outer sole and the inner sole in relation with each other.

11. An athletic shoe having an inner sole, an outer sole, an inter sole between the outer and inner soles, cleats having cleat body portions rigidly attached to the inter sole and extending through the outer sole and having wearing portions attached to and covering the portion extending through the outer sole, the covering wearing portions comprising wooden bodies and securing means above their bottoms and extending transversely into said cleat bodies of the cleats.

In testimony whereof I afiix my signature.

VIRGIL C. DICKSON.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2888756 *Jun 11, 1958Jun 2, 1959Parsons Neal ByronSole for football shoes
US3127687 *Oct 17, 1962Apr 7, 1964Hollister Solomon CAthletic shoe
US6041461 *Feb 25, 1998Mar 28, 2000Yugenkaisha Shinjo SeisakushoSpike for baseball shoes
US6178667 *Apr 22, 1999Jan 30, 2001Mizuno CorporationSole of baseball spiked shoe and method of measuring shearing stress distribution of baseball spiked shoe
US6182381 *Nov 4, 1996Feb 6, 2001Mizuno CorporationSole of baseball spiked shoe and method of measuring shearing stress distribution of baseball spiked shoe
US6186000Apr 22, 1999Feb 13, 2001Mizuno CorporationApparatus and method for measuring shearing stress distribution on the sole of a spiked shoe
US6948261 *Jun 28, 2001Sep 27, 2005Stephanie GrassoSupplemental removable outersole for footwear
US20130074372 *Sep 28, 2011Mar 28, 2013Sung Te ChenEmbodied systematic infrastructure bracket shoes
Classifications
U.S. Classification36/59.00R, 36/134
International ClassificationA43B5/00, A43B5/06
Cooperative ClassificationA43B5/06
European ClassificationA43B5/06