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Publication numberUS1598504 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 31, 1926
Filing dateJun 13, 1925
Priority dateJun 13, 1925
Publication numberUS 1598504 A, US 1598504A, US-A-1598504, US1598504 A, US1598504A
InventorsPierce Earl R, Pierce Ernest E
Original AssigneePierce Earl R, Pierce Ernest E
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Ankle brace
US 1598504 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Aug. 31 1926.

E. R. PIERCE Er AL ANKLE BRACE June l5, 1925 2 Sheets-Sheet l Aug. 31,1926. 1,598,504

E. R. PIERCE ET AU ANKLE BRACE Filed June 13 1925 2 Vsheets-sheet A 2 sired amount ot flexibility to the ankle andv Patented Aug. 3'1, 192e.

UNITED STATES EARL R. PIERCE .AN D' ERNEST E. PIER CE, OF SHELBY, MONTANA. y

ANKLE Banca.

`Application led June 13, 1925. Serial No. 36,969.

This invention relatesv to ankle braces such as are used by skaters but also adaptable fo use under other circumstances..

The general object of the invention is to provide an ankle brace which is simple, strong, thoroughly effective for the purpose intended, and vet which lwill give the depermit the foot to be flexed with relation to the ankle. n

A further object is to provide a device of this character which, by an interchanging of parts, is adapted to a great many different circumstances of use.

Our invention is illustrated in the accompanying drawings, wherein Figure 1'is a perspective view of one form otl ankle brace constructed in accordance with our invention;

Figure 2 is a fragmentary vertical tional view thereof;

Figure 3 is a perspective view of another form of heel plate showing the portion l;

Figure 4 is a section on the line 4--4 ot Figure 3;

Figure 5 isfan elevation of another form of heel plate and slide;

Figure 6 isa section on the line 6;(3 ot SCC- Figure 5, the tang being shown in dotted` lines;

Figure is a rear elevation of the construction shown in Figure 8;

Figure 8 is a section on the line 8-8 of Figure 5.

Referring to the. construction' shown in Figures 1 and 2, it will be seen that the ankle brace consists of the vertically'extending tang or shank 10 which is made of relatively thin but stili, resilient metal. The upper end of this tang 1() is formed with a transverse portion 11 andV this T-shaped upper portiolrof the tang 10 is enclosed within a semi-circular leather'pad 12 formed in two pieces stitched together, as at 13. Also passing through this pad and adapted to pass around the leg is an upper strap 14 having a buckle 15 an'd a lower strap 16 having "a like buckle.

Adapted to be connected to this tang 10 is any one of a number of shoe-engaging mem,- bers. In Figure 3 we illustrate-a very simple form of shoe-engaging member consistingy of a.v curved metal yoke 17 adapted to partially embrace a heel andbe attached thereto by means of the transverse bolt 18,

this metal plate having an upwardly eX- tending portion 19 adapted to lie flat against the shank or tang 10 and formed with the inturned flanges 2() constituting a guide and fitting tightly against the Vshank 10 sothat this member 19 may slide up and down upon this shank 10. This construction will brace the ankle and prevent any free pivotal move-` ment of the foot with relation to the ankle but at the same time will permit the heel to move vertically with relation to the brace 10 and the elasticity o't the brace will permit a slight flexing of the ankle. In Figure 1 we showanother shoe-engaging attachment comprising a slide 21-having inturned flanges .22 adapted'to fit upon and slide on the tang 10. This slide at its lower end is formed with the hinge bead 23 which engages a pintle 24 which passes through hinge beads 25 formed in the upper end of a heel plate 26 which extends downward and partially embraces the heel A and to which it isfastened either by screws or by a transverse bolt.s'uch as the bolt 18. This construction permits the foot to move vertically relative to the brace but also permits a flexing of the foot at the ankle joint.

In Figures 5 to 8 we illustrate still another form which is comparable to the construction shown in Figure 1 and comprises 'the heel plate 27 formed at its lower end to partially embrace the heel and be attached thereto, as by means of a bolt or screw, as previously described, this heel plate, being enlarged at its upper end and formed to provide two hinge beads 28. Pivotedupon lthe pintle 29 of this plate is a slide plate 30 which is formed atits four corners with outwardly projecting lugs 314. Opposed eXteriorly to the ends of this sliding plate are transverse bars 32, and disposed between these bars at the cornersof the slide plate opposite the lugs 31 are the grooved rollers 33 which engage the edges of the tang. This construction is the same in general efect as that shown in Figure 1 but the grooved rollers permit a readier sliding action of the slide plate 30 upon the tang 10.

The Vankle brace as described has been found by us to be particularly effective for use in skating where the skaters ankles are weak and liable to turn, but it is also eminently adaptable for permanent cripples or but at the same time gives ample Hexibility to the ankle joint to permit the usual flexing of the foot and ankle joint.

W'hile we have illustrated certain details of construction and arrangement of parts which we believe to be particularly effective, we do not wish to be limited to this as it is obvious that many changes might be made without departing from the spirit of the invention as defined in the appended claims.

The construction shown in Figure 1 is probably the preferable construction for skating because it is simple, light, strong and permits sulicient freedom ot movement for all ordinary skaters and can be economically constructed. The heel engaging member shown in Figure 3 works in the manner ot' a hinge upon the bolt 18 and this allows a lorward and backward n'iovement of the leg, and where the heel engaging member is hinged it allows'the heel to have a downward and forward movement or upward and rearward movement with respect to the ankle in the are of a circle as the toe is raised and lowered respectively. The hinge further allows the slide and tang to work together without unnecessary friction which would be caused by forcing the tang through the slide when the tang is bent.

The heel engaging members shown in Figures 5 to 8, while they will cost more in actual construction, will Wear longer and work more smoothly and are better adapted for wear by persons with weak or crippled ankles. Furthermore, this type permits oiling more readily than the type shown in Figure 1. It is to be understood that the combination of the forms shown in the sev-` eral figures might be used especlally for use where-the ice is soft and Hakes collect on the shoe heel and soften the leather which would thus permit screws, it' used, to become loose or torn out. It is also to be understood that the tang may be curved so as to fit closely around the back of the, heel and it is to be understood that the parts of this brace may be entirely or partially enclosed in soft leather or fabric. These braces make it possible for women or men with weak ankles to learn to skate. The device can be attached to the heel of the shoe or to the skate to hold the skate in as near a vertical position as may be desired when the wearer is in an upright position. The tan-g will prevent any tipping of the skate to either side.

We claim 1, An ankle brace of the character described comprising a transversely flat tang of resilient metal having means at its upper end whereby it may be bound upon the leg, the tang extending downward from said means, and a shoe heel engaging member slidably engaged with the tang and including a flat plate-like member overlapping the tang and having sliding contact therewith.

An ankle brace ols the character described comprising a vertically extending transversely llat lang having means at its upper end whereby it may be engaged with a leg, the tang being ot' resilient metal, a flat slide slidingly mounted upon the tang and bearing tlat against the tace of the tang, and a shoe heel engaging plate hing'cdly engaged with said slide, the plate at its lower end being laterally extended and curved to partially embrace the heel and be attached thereto.

An ankle brace of the character described comprising a tang having a cross piece at its upper end transversely curved to fit the leg, a pad within which the cross piece and the upper portion ot the tang are enclosed and having straps whereby it may be bound upon the leg, the tang being ot' Cil transversely fiat resilient metal, and a heelengaging member including a transversely flat plate bearing flat against said lang and ha fing slidin'i engagement with the tang.

l. An ankle brace ot the character delseril-ed comprising a tang having a pad at ils upper end and curved to partially embrace the leg and having straps whereby il may be bound upon the leg, the tang being ol' resilient metal, a slide engaglng the tang and carrying grooved rollers bearing against the side. edges ot the tang,` and a heel plate hingedly engaged with the lower end of the slide and having means whereby it may be engaged with the shoe heel.

5. An ankle brace of the character described comprising a tang having means at its upper end whereby it may be bound upon the leg, the tang extended downward trom said means and being slightly resilient and transversely flat, a slide engaging the tang and carrying laterally disposed grooved rollers bearing against the side edges ot the tang` and a heel plate hingedly engaged with the lower and of the slide, and having means whereby it. may be engaged with the shoe heel.

ln testimony whereof we hereunto aix our signatures.

EARL R. PIERCE. ERNEST E. PIERCE.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2444839 *Jul 21, 1945Jul 6, 1948American BracesDrop-foot brace
US2557603 *Oct 14, 1949Jun 19, 1951Invidiato Cosmo LDrop-foot brace
US2663294 *Jan 5, 1952Dec 22, 1953Harrison John RDrop foot brace
US4284292 *May 21, 1979Aug 18, 1981Antonio FaulinSki fastener structure
US4295466 *May 16, 1980Oct 20, 1981Hosmer/Dorrance CorporationLimb engaging band for orthotic device
US4329982 *Oct 17, 1980May 18, 1982Heaney Audrey COrthotic foot assist apparatus
US5038499 *Feb 28, 1990Aug 13, 1991Martinez Jr RamonSeparable shoe strap construction
US5716336 *Jul 26, 1996Feb 10, 1998Hines; Kevin L.Adjustable foot brace
US6102881 *Apr 23, 1999Aug 15, 2000Todd R. QuackenbushHinged drop foot brace
US6423021Jun 7, 2001Jul 23, 2002Z-CoilAnkle brace
US6792700Mar 20, 2002Sep 21, 2004Z-CoilShoe with integrated internal ankle brace
US7077403 *May 10, 2004Jul 18, 2006The Burton CorporationHighback with independent forward lean adjustment
US7748729Jun 30, 2006Jul 6, 2010The Burton CorporationHighback with independent forward lean adjustment
US8062243Jun 30, 2008Nov 22, 2011Anatomical Concepts, Inc.Orthotic device for a pivoting joint of the human body
US8425440Jan 27, 2010Apr 23, 2013Anatomical Concepts, Inc.Orthotic capable of accepting replaceable supports for a pivoting joint of a human body
US8540655 *Jan 8, 2010Sep 24, 2013Toad Medical CorporationWeight-bearing lower extremity brace
US8596650 *Oct 11, 2011Dec 3, 2013Easton Sports, Inc.Hockey skate
US8672865 *Sep 28, 2011Mar 18, 2014Toad Medical CorporationWeight-bearing lower extremity brace
US8684368Mar 12, 2012Apr 1, 2014Easton Sports, Inc.Hockey skate
US8904674Apr 7, 2011Dec 9, 2014Nathan SchwartzAnkle-foot orthosis
US20040207178 *May 10, 2004Oct 21, 2004The Burton CorporationHighback with independent forward lean adjustment
US20060249930 *Jun 30, 2006Nov 9, 2006The Burton CorporationHighback with independent forward lean adjustment
US20090326426 *Jun 30, 2008Dec 31, 2009Anatomical Concepts, Inc.Orthotic device for a pivoting joint of the human body
US20100130900 *Jan 27, 2010May 27, 2010Anatomical Concepts, Inc.Orthotic Capable of Accepting Replaceable Supports for a Pivoting Joint of a Human Body
US20100174219 *Jan 8, 2010Jul 8, 2010Franke Hans GWeight-bearing lower extremity brace
US20120025478 *Feb 2, 2012Scott Van HorneHockey skate
US20120083722 *Apr 5, 2012Toad CorporationWeight-bearing lower extremity brace
DE102012102012A1 *Mar 9, 2012Sep 12, 2013Helmut WagnerUnterschenkelorthese
WO2013131875A1Mar 5, 2013Sep 12, 2013Helmut WagnerBelow-knee orthosis
Classifications
U.S. Classification602/27, 280/11.36
International ClassificationA61F5/058, A61F5/04
Cooperative ClassificationA61F5/0585
European ClassificationA61F5/058H2