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Publication numberUS1598644 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 7, 1926
Filing dateOct 7, 1921
Priority dateOct 7, 1921
Publication numberUS 1598644 A, US 1598644A, US-A-1598644, US1598644 A, US1598644A
InventorsGreene Oscar V
Original AssigneeGreene Oscar V
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Gas-cleaning apparatus
US 1598644 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

2 Sheets-Sheet 1 o. v. GREENE GAS CLEANING APPARATUS Filed Oct. 7, 1921 lllllll Sept. 7 1926.

. INVENTOR.

Oscar 1 Greece BY% v z ATTQRNEY5 Sept. 7 1926.

0. v. GREENE GAS CLEANING APPARATUS Filed Oct. '7, 1921 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR.

A TTORNEYIS 05car 1 [wa /2e through the screens and out of the casing and the like.

Patented Sept. 7, 1926.

UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE.

OSCAR V. GREENE, OF CLEVELAND, OHIO.

' GAS-CLEANING APPARATUS.

Application filed October 7, 1921. Serial No. 506,099-

The present invention relates to an improved gas cleaning apparatus for removing fine particles of dust and other solid matter from various gases such as blast furnace gas To the accomplishment of the foregoing and related ends, said invention, then, consists of the means hereinafter fully described and particularly pointed out in the claims.

The ai'inexed drawings and the following description set forth in detail certain mechanism embodying the invention, such disclosed means constituting, however, but one of various mechanical forms in which the principle of the invention may be used.

In said annexed drawings a vertical section taken at right angles to the section of Fig. 1; Fig. 3 is a planview of the apparatus shown in Figs. 1 and 2.; Fig. 4 is a partial section taken on the same plane as the section of Fig. 1, but showing on an enlarged scale the screen-holding mechanism; Fig. 5 is a plan View of one of the screens used in my apparatus; Fig. 6 is a partial view similar to Fig. 1, but showing the screens expanded; Fig. 7 is a sectional view showing a modification of the screen frames and methodlof sealing them into the casing; and Fig. 8 is a side elevation of the upper portion of one of the frames shown in Fig. 7; Fig. 9 is a vertical section showing a further modification'of the screen holding frames and cover construction.

In Fig. 1 there-,is shown a casing 1. provided with a gas inlet passage 2 and'gas outlet passages 3 formed on opposite sides of the upper portion of the casing. Mounted between the gas outlet passages 3 are two series of dust-removing screens which are hung in vertical positions, one in front of each .of the passages 3, the gas being allowed to pass upwardly through the casing between these twoseries of screens ahd then by means of passages 3.

The construction and mounting of the gas cleaning screens is shown in detail in Fig. 4. The top 5 of the casing is open and is provided with angle plates 6 upon which there rests a removable cover plate 7 which is held in place by suitableclamps 8. Ex-

tending downwardly from this cover plate are two flanges 9 and 10 spaced a suitable distance apart and carrying transverse horizontal rods or bars 11 in a position closely upwardly extending angle plate 13 apertured to fit loosely over the rods 11 and provided with bearing rollers 14 which rest upon the bars 11 and facilitate movement of the frame therealong. Mounted on the adjacent surfaces of the angles 9 and 13 are compressible pads 15 of some suitable material. such, for instance, as woven asbestos. Fig. 1 is a transverse vertical sectionthrough my improved apparatus; Fig. 2 is The frame 12 is provided with a transverse bar 16 intermediate its ends, to which is attached a bracket 17 and a pivoted link 18. This link 18 is in turn pivotally connected to a vertically mounted plunger bar 19 which extends externally of the cover and through an opening formed in top of the casing 5 in order that the bar and framework may be operated from outside of the gas-cleaning apparatus. A similar construction is mounted in a reverse position to that just described and is also connected to the plunger 19 by means of a link 20 so that these two frames maybe pulled toward each other and then pressed or swung away from each other at the same time by asingle movement of the plunger 19.

For removing the dust and other articles of solid materal from the gas I emp 0y a series of woven wire screens 21,-each of which is movably mqunted on the bars 11 between the pads 15 on the angles 9 and 13. When the plunger 19 is'moved downward and the v frames 12 are moved against the screens, the latter are pressed tightly against each other and against the open framework 22. The edges of all the screens. in this position are sealed between the compressible pads 15 the edges of the screens, all of the gas being forced to pass through .thescreens and then out of thepassage ports 3. At proper intervals when the screens have collected a considerable amount of dust and other solid matter, the plunger 19 is raised pulling the frames 12 into the position shown in dotted .so that there may be no escape of gas between beingaided by thehem lines in Fig. 1 and allowing the screenstobe spaced apart slightly, (Fig. 6) this spacing around the periphery of each screen and by the natural resilience of the screens which were in compression when the frames were, in their vertical positions.- The plunger is then moveddown- I ward'to cause the frames 12 to .strike against cover in Whicht he cover 40 is provided'with two downwardly extending angle irons 41,

corresponding to 9 and 10 of Fig. 5, which I leg for accommodating rods 44 in cover. A

through the casing.

are faced away from each other; The station-- ary screen-holding frame, 22 in Fig. 3, in this form, is'provided with a cross connecting angle iron 42, having slots in its upturned small angle iron 43 is attached to the lower horizontal flange of the angle in such a way as to form a long shallow pocket, running theentire length of angle 42. Angle 42 is firmly attached to channel46, which in turn is fastened to casing by angles 22 and 22. The cover is positioned laterally by one side of'channels 46 and lugs 47 which latter act also as seals'a't ends of angles-41. When cover is put in place,the long shallow pocket is filled with mud or grout, into which the vertical leg of one of angle irons 41 dip, thereby forming a perfect seal against gas leakage around edges of screen retaining frame.

The material which is removed from the screens falls vertically downward between them striking against the inclined lower surface'25, and from which it may be discharged by raising a conical valve 26 which is operated, by a rod 27 extending upwardly.

My apparatus is so constructed that the screens may be readil removed by merely uncoupling link 18 an loosening the clamps 8 and then lifting out ofthe casing the entire cover, movable screen frame and screens, as

' an'ei'itire unit, and the screens then repaired or replaced and the unit again set in position.

The screens which are used in .thepresent apparatus have openings off-considerably therefore these dust greater size than the size of the dust particles which are to be collected and ordinarily particles would pass through the screens,'and but a very small percentage would be collected upon the wires of the screens. v

The dusts which are encountered in metallurgical and industrial plants vary greatly in one particular, i. e., the .tendency for the separate particles to which tendency, when marked, we will designate by the word adhesive, a characteristic possessed by most fumes, as against a non-adhesive tendency, which we will des-- ignate by the word granular, character- 1st1c of dry cement, sand, etc.

.When. woven wire screens of very small :mesh are used as a filtering-medium for fume producing gases,

through. W'itli non-adhesive on ,granular dust, this tendency to plug is practically nil,

and in consequence a much smaller mesh may be 'used than is'the case with adhesive dust. It will be observed that the matter'of ridding the filtering medium of major portion' of the dust is .of as great importance dysts are in a large measure like mud, While granular dusts act' in a manner similar to a sand blast;

In my method of using superposed screens of woven wire the dust collecting is accomplished by battling the gases so that the par ticles of dust impinge upon the screen surface, whereby the momentum' is taken out of the dust-particle and it drops out of the gas the fume tends toso that'the gas cannot pass adhere to each other,

'90 as isthe matter of collecting it. Adhesive stream, collecting on the layer of dust which is retained on the screens by the roughened lar and the gas velocity high, the sand blast eifect isprcduced, and a large number of screens are required to effect-the dust separation or collection. Whereas with adhesive dust, the particles adhere to each other readily, a small number-of screens will pro duce the results required.

surface on the wires. If the dust is granu- From'the foregoing it will be observed that the property which facilitates, co1lec.-- tion, i. e. adhesiveness,'is likewise the propert which occasions plugging. or an inability of getting pro erl rid of the'dust, in

consequence of whic t e filtering surface,

both in character and amount, must be adapted to the particular characteristics ofthe dusts contended 'with.

Mention has been made in previous applications of methods of roughening the wire strands of the. screen to produce this dust coating on the wires, and of stagger ingand orienting the mesh onthe screens to provide as tortuous a sible.

As reviously mentioned, as the dusts approac the granular character the number a I of screens must be increased and the gas velocity through the screens relatively repassage as posthe very fine particles of solid material.

which is found in gases on relatively coarse screens. In Fig. 5 I have shown an enlarged view of a part of one of the screens after such treatment. The screens are first coated with some adhesive which will dry or fuse into a hard condition, and will not be affected, or at least will not be softened when subjected to relatively high temperatures. There are various adhesives which may be used for this purpose, but I have employed sodium silicate which forms a hard cellular coating over the wires of the screen when subjected to heat before it is thoroughly dry. 'After the sodium silicate has been applied to the wire, but before it is dry, I distribute uniformly over either one or both surfaces of the screen finely divided or finely ground fibrous material, such, for example, as asbestos or mineral wool which readily adheres to the sodium silicate or other adhesive. With the ad hesive, the fibrous material forms an irregular fibrous and cellular mass on each wire, which presents a very considerable area of dust-collecting surface. The matter of alignment when using a coating of this nature is not material. The dust particles are caught against or between the fibers on the wires of the screen and are there held until the screens are jarred, which action results in dropping the collected dust, but does not appreciably injure the coating either of adhesive or fibrous material which is on the wires of the screen. Of course, in time the screens will lose some of the fibrous material through repeated jarring for the purpose of cleaning, and must then be removed and either re-coated or newscreens must be substituted.

Fig. 9 is-a modification of Fig. 7 arrange ment, in that the seal is effected without the need of any grout or mud, and a separate and additional cover plate with gas tight gasket is employed in place of cover plate on removable screen holding head. In this arrangement the stationary screen holding frame 50 is entirely sealed in the casing around its edges and no dependence is placed upon the fit of the movable head to effect the seal.

Other modes of applying the principle of my invention may be employed instead of the one explained, change being made as re gards the mechanism herein disclosed, provided the means stated by any of the following claims or the equivalent of such stated means be employed.

I-therefore particularly point out and distinctly claim as my invention -1. In a gas cleaning apparatus, the combination of a casing provided with gas inlet and outlet connections, a series of dust collccting screens mounted in a vertical position insaid casing between said inlet and outlet connections, and mechanically oper' atcd means adapted to move said screens into compacted relation.

2. In a gas cleaning apparatus, the combination of a casing provided with gas and inlet and outlet connections, a series of laterally movable dust collecting screens mounted in vertical position in close relation in said casing between said inlet and outlet' connections and means engaging against one of said screens adapted to jar said screens against each other to loosen dust collected thereon.

3. In a gas cleaning apparatus, the combination of a casing provided with gas inlet and outlet connections, a series of screens each pivotally and slidably mounted at one end and said screens being mounted adjacent to each other in vertical positions he I tween said inlet and outlet connections in said casing, and means engaging against one of said screens, said means being adapted to jar said screens against each other to loosen dust collected thereon.

4. In a gas cleaning apparatus, the combination of a casing provided with gas inlet and outlet connections, a series of screens each pivotally and slidably mounted at one end and said screens being mounted adjacent to each other in vertical positions between said inlet and outlet connections in said casing, a framework also pivotally mounted about the same axis as said screens, and means extending exteriorly of said casing, said means being adapted to cause said frame to jar said screens'to loosen the dust collected thereon.

5. In a gas cleaning apparatus, the combination of a casing provided with gas inlet and outlet connections and having also an opening in its top, a cover removably mounted to close such opening in the top of said casing, a series of fiat screens pivotally supported from said cover in close proximity to each other, and means engaging against one of said screens, said meansbeing adapted to jar said screens against each other to loosen dust collected thereon.

6. In a gas cleaning apparatus, the combination of a casing provided with gas inlet and outlet connections and having also an opening in its top, a cover removably mounted to close such opening in the top of said casing, a series of flat screens pivotally mounted on said cover in close proximity to' each other and in position to hang between.

means being adapted to jar said screens against each other tolooseirthe dust col-" lected thereon, and a valve in the bottom'of said casing adapted to control the removal v of dust falling-t such bottom from said" screens;

8. In a gas cleaning apparatus, the combination of a' casing provided with gas inlet and outlet connections, work; mounted between said inlet and outlet connections, a. movable framework mounted between said lnlet and outlet COIIHGCtlQIlS,

a series of dust collecting screens mounted between said stationary and said movable framework, and means adapted to move said movable framework against and away from sa1d screens. 7

In agas cleaningapparatus,the com binatlon of a casing provided with gas inlet and outlet connections, a stationary framework mounted between said inlet and outlet connections, a movable framework mounted framework,

the edges of said screens between said sta between said inlet and outlet connections, a series of dust collecting screens mounted be-' tween said stationary and said movable and means adapted to compress tionary and movable framework.

10. In a gas cleaning apparatus, the combination of a casing provided with gas inlet and outlet connections,-a series of foram- .inous sheets separably mounted in an upright position in said casing in juxtaposed relation between said inlet and outlet connections and being capableof movement out w of normal JLlXiiflPOSGd relation for cleaning.

11. A dust'clcaning element comprising an integral woven wire screen provided'with a relatively rigid body portion and a compressible marginal portion integral there-- with.

12. A dust collecting screen comprising a metallic wovenwire screen having its edge portions rebent upon thebody of the screen, thereby providing an integral resilient, compressive marginal portion.

13. In a dust collecting apparatus, the comb nation of. a series of spacedwoven wire screens mounted to move toward and away from each other, resilient spacing means from each other, ly extending marginal portions lying paralwardly extending marginal portions a stationary frame-v mounted around the edgesof said screens, and means adapted to compress sa1d screens together. 4 I

14. In a dust collecting apparatus, the combination of a series of spaced woven wire screens mounted to 'move toward and away said screens having inwardlel thereto, and means adapted to compress said screens togetl1er.'

15." In a dust collecting apparatus, the combination of a series of spaced woven wire from each -other, said screens having inlying parallel thereto, and a screen compressing framework adapted to engage said screens opposite such marginal portions.

16. In apparatus of the character described, the combination of a casing provided wi-tlrinlet and outlet openings, a dust receiver connected thereto, a .filtering ele-- ment comprising a plurality of -foraminous sheets mounted in pixtaposed relation between such inlet and outlet openings, and means restricting the passage of gas through suclr'element to a direction at approximately right angles thereto.

ed with inlet and outlet openings, a dust receiver connected thereto, a filtering element comprising a plurality of foraminous sheets mounted in juxtaposed relation between such inlet and outlet openings, means restricting the passage of gas .throughsuch element to a direction at approximately right anglesthereto, and othermeans adapted to permit discharge of dust collected by said elements in adirection parallel to and between said sheets into said dust receiver.

18. In apparatus of the character described, the combination' of a dust collecting. medium, comprising a plurality of foraminous sheets placed in close proximity .to each other, adapted to close the margins of said medium against said support, and means adapted to open said margins from said support for the discharge of dust from said medium.

1 9-. In apparatus of the character described, the combination of a casing rovided-with inlet and outlet openings, a. ust receiver connected thereto, a dust collecting medium mounted in said casing, means adapted to seal the marginal portions of said medium against the walls of said casing to prevent the passage of gas thereby, and other means adapted to unseal the margins of said medium for the discharge vof dust therethrough.

20. In apparatus of the character described, the combination of a casing provided with inlet and outlet openings, a dust receiver connected thereto, a plurality of su- 17. In apparatus of the character described, the combination of a casing-provldscreens mounted'to' move toward and away a support for said medium, means perposed reticulated elements placed in substantially parallel vertical relation to said casing between inlet and outlet openings, such elements being adapted to collect suspended material throughout their intramarginal portions, and means operable exteriorly of said casing for looseningsaid material from said elements, said means being also adapted to separate said elements to permit discharge of collected material therefrom into," said receiver.

- 21.111 apparatus of the character de-' scribed, the combination of a casing having inlet and outlet openings, a series of parallel scr eens mqunted in close proximity to each other said casing between such openings, and means removably sealing the lowermost margins of said screens against the wall of said casing to prevent the passage of gas thereby, said means being also adapted to free such lowermost margins from said casing to permit the discharge of material collected on said screens from between the same.

22. In apparatus of the character described, the combination of a casing having inlet and outlet openings, a series of parallel screens mounted in juxtaposed relation in said casing between such openings, means removably sealing the lowermost margins of w said screens against the wall of said casing to prevent the passage of gas thereby, said means being also adapted to free such lowermost margins from said'casing to permit the discharge of material collected on said screens from between the same, and means for.jarring said screens to free material collected thereon.

23. In apparatus of the character described, the combination of a dust collecting medium, including a plurality of foraminous sheets in close proximity to each other, a frame supporting said medium, means adapted to seal the marginal portions of said medium against said frame to restrict the flow of gas therepast, and means adapted to unseal said marginal portions from said frame for the dischargeof dust from said medium.

24. In apparatus of the character described, the combination of a casing provided with inlet and outlet openings, a plurality of forammous dust collecting sheets mounted in compacted relation between said openings,

and means sealing said sheets against the walls of said casing and against each other and maintaining the same in such compacted relation. v

Signed by me, this*30t h day of September, 1921.. i

OSCAR V. GREENE.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2955064 *Jun 7, 1957Oct 4, 1960Res Prod CorpMineral coated liquid-gas contact pad
US3246756 *Dec 19, 1962Apr 19, 1966Ridge Equipment CoMethod and apparatus for uniformly diffusing mineral suspension fluid
US4328014 *Apr 22, 1981May 4, 1982The Scott & Fetzer CompanySweeper hopper with filter assembly
DE1457264B1 *May 29, 1954Jun 29, 1972American Air Filter CoElektrostatischer filter
Classifications
U.S. Classification55/300, 55/484, 55/524
International ClassificationC10K1/00, C10K1/02
Cooperative ClassificationC10K1/024
European ClassificationC10K1/02D