Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS1599579 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 14, 1926
Filing dateApr 19, 1926
Priority dateApr 19, 1926
Publication numberUS 1599579 A, US 1599579A, US-A-1599579, US1599579 A, US1599579A
InventorsMarion Milewski
Original AssigneeMarion Milewski
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Game apparatus
US 1599579 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Sept. 14 1926. 1,599,579

M. MlLEwsKl GAME APPARATUS Originaf Filed Nov. 27, 19120v 4 Sheets-Sheet 1 Uffa/7 /V//en/JAV Sept. 14 192e. 1,599,579

M. MILEWSKI GAME APPARATUS original Filed Nov. 27. 1920 4 Sheets-sheet '2 I N VE? TOR.

ATTORNEY.

Sept.14,1926. 1,599,579

M. MlLEWSKl GAME APPARATUS Original Filed Nov, 2, 1920 4 Sheets-Sheet 3 MWVZVENTOR.

ATTORNEY.

Sept. 14, 192e.' 1599 579 I M. MILEWSKI GAME APARATUs Original Filed Nov. 27, 1920 4 sheets-sheet 4 Nar/.bn 79 VMS Afl'I A TTORNEY,

IN V EN TOR..

Patented Sept, 1.4-, 1926. i

UNITED STATES Lassie Parana N ost-lcs MARION MILEWSKI, OF LEBANON, PENNSYLVANIA.

` GAME APPARATUS.

Reled for abandoned application Serial No. 42611, filed November 27, 1920. This application filed April 19, 1926.

The invention relates to games designed to afford both recreation and amusement and particularly to games involving both the element of skill and chance. This application is a substitute for abandoned application Ser. No. 426,811.

An object of the invention is to provide a game of the character' referred to, wherein at least two players may participate at the same time, and without interference from one another. i

An additional object is to provide an apparatus wherein manually operated means are employed for impelling game `pieces across a given space and towards selected score holes, means being provided for automatically registering thescore as made.

Anadditional object is to provide a game apparatus wherein a shooting device is employed for impelling game pieces against the scoring device, the said apparatus ernbodying a tallying mechanism for recording the shots made and the games played.

The invention is capable of embodiment in a variety of forms, that herein illustrated being one that has been found to be practicable, but is given only as .an example of the development of the generic idea.

llVith the aboveand other objects in view. the invention may be said to reside in the details of construction, combination and arrangement o parts as will be hereinafter more fully pointed out in detail, reference being' had to the accompanying drawings, wherein is shown in detail my present construction, said drawings, with the numerals ot reference marked thereon forming a part of this specification, and in which- Figure 1 is a top plan view of the apparatus constructed in accordance with the invention. Figure 2 is a vertical, longitudinal section taken on theline 2--2 of Figure l.

Figure 3 shows the manner in which the balls are arranged between the teeth of the rack.

Figure 4 is an enlarged transverse sectional view ozt the means for scoring.

Figures is a cross section of the scoring end of the game table as indicated by line of Figure 1, and disclosing the scoring-eyes.

Figure 6 is a longitudinal section taken through the shootingdevice.

Figure 7 is a similar sectional rit-iw of the tallying device. r

serial No. 103,169.

Figure 8 is a detail View of thetally and operating lever, and

Figure 9 is a detail view of the shoe attachment for the table-leg.

Like numerals of reference indicate like parts throughoutl the several views in which they appear.

While it is to be understood that the playing space may be likewise a floor or alley, it is, inthe vpreferred embodiment ot' the invention, comprised in a game table 1 constructed somewhat after the manner of a pool or billiard table and similarly provided with stout undersupports or legs 2, side cushions 3 and bed l. The surface of the table is apportioned oft into two playing surfaces or alleys 5 and 6. These alleys are enclosed bythe vertical frames or side rails 7, Awhich converge in a triangle at their forward ends, as indicated at 5 and 6', the rear ends of the spaces being closed by a common receiving chamber extending transversely of one end of the table. Each alley is provided with the flooring having the smooth and firm cloth-covered rolling surface 9,

level throughout the major portion of its i length and sloping downwardly at the receiving end of the table into a gutter or pit 10. This pit runs parallel with the end of the table and communicates with side gutters or channels 11, parallel with the sides of the table as indicated. These gutters provide for the return of the game pieces from the receiving chamber. The table may be built level and is giventhe necessary slant for thereturn roll of the game pieces from the receiving chamber, by means ont shoesvQ/ which t onto the end oit' the hind or rear legs of the table. These shoes are, preferably, triangular, as indicated iin Figure 9, and conform to the preferred shape of the table-leg, lbeing provided with a central recess or pocket in which the legs rest. When the slices are in place, the table is accordingly sloped so that whenl a game piece enters the pit, it will `roll easily to either side-gutter, both oll which lead toward the front or shooting end of the table.

Arranged over the pit is a receiving chamber which comprises a small, narrow, boxlike affair, having the back wall 12 located in the rear of the pit andthe front wall 13 mounted upon the sloping end of the alley, an appreciable distance forwardly of the pit,1 A top plate 14e reiner/ably fastened te the l'lll lill li L

walls forms a removable cover for the receiving chamber. The front wall has a se ries of openings therein adjacent the lower edge, as indicated at 15 to provide entrances into the chamber and to pit 10. There may be any number of these entrance openings desired, and arranged between each pair of openings is a forwardly projecting guide rail or linger 16. The spaces between the guide rails provide short alley ways leading directly to the openings and of a width slightly exceeding the uniform diameter of the game pieces so as to require a certain amount of skill as well as chance in impelling a game piece cushioned at the tip and along the sides, as indicated at 17, to withstand the impact of game pieces striking thereagainst without danger of breakage or distortion, and also cloth-covered to harmonize with the cloth-covered alley.

Within the receiving chamber is mounted the scoring device which includes elongated scoring-eyes 18 mounted to slide back and forth within eye-blocks 19 arranged just above and rearwardly of each chamber opening or score-hole 15. Each alley way and score hole is thus provided with its own individual scoring element, operating independently of the scoring element of the other opening and alley-way. The eye-block 19 is bored longitudinally through opposite ends to provide a socket 2O for this scoring eye, and slots 21 and 22 communicate with the socket as shown. A yieldable element in the nature of a flat spring 23 is fastened to the eye-block with a portion flexed downwardly through block 19 and bearing upon the scoring eye to hold it firm and steady in place. Disposed within the chamber, on opposite sides of the pit 10 and resting snugly up against the front and rear walls thereof, are supporting blocks 24 and 25. These blocks support the eye block 19 and are each formed with horizontally extending shoulders or seats 26 upon which; the ends of the eye blocks rest. Supporting block 24 has an opening registering with the socket 2O to permit the scoring eye to be projected for wardly and the rear supporting block has either an opening or a recess 27 registering with the socket to receive the rear end of the scoring eye when the latter is pushed inwardly. This permits the depending arm 28 of the latter to be dispose-d suiliciently to one side of the pit 10 as to be out of the path of the game pieces rolling therein. A vertically extending groove 29 is formed below recess 27, on the inside of the block to accommodate the arm. The arm depends rigidly from the scoring eye through slot 22 and rearwardly of the opening 15 so as to hang directly in the path of a gaine piece rolling through the alley way. The game piece strikes the arm and slides the scoring eye back out of the eye-opening of the front chamber-wall, as it rolls on into the pit; the spring 23 yielding to the force of the impact. Suitable means 30 are provided on the arm for cushioning the striking impact of the game pieces and preventing injury to the arm. The scoring eyes, which may be of ivory or other suitable substance are numbered as illustrated in Figure 5 of the draw ing to denote the scoring value of the various alleyways, which scoring value may be set at any amount desired. rthe eye openings of the front wall 13 through which the numbered ends of the scoring eyes are visible, are framed by annular washers 31 which provide supporting frames for holding` transparent panels or covering for they scoring eyes. In their correct position, the scoring eyes are projected forwardly in the socket and are clearly visible through the eye openings but when slid backwardly as a gamev l piece strikes the arm, the scoring eye becomes invisible and the eye opening is then said to become vacant or blind. rihe points are scored in the proportion that the eyes are blinded The scoring device is readily removable from the receiving chamber and may be either constructed of a single eye-block extending lengthwise of the chamber and resting upon front and rear supporting blocks, with the scoring eyes vfitted in a plurality of sockets formed in the single eye block or the device may be split up into separate eye blocks and supports, each being separate and distinct from the others and separately removable from the chamber. rlhe i.'

removable cover 14: when in place prevents tampering with the scoring device.

Associated with each playing spacey or alley is a spotting rack which consists of a cross head or stock 32 disposed horizontally between the side rails of the enclosing frame and provided with' triangular openings (not shown), into each of which lits an upper flared end of one of the vertically disposed, laterally spaced, rack teeth 34. The teeth are preferably of hard rubber and also triangular in shape as indicated in Figure 3, being inserted into the opening from the top and held against displacement by a top plate 33 subsequently fitted to the stock over the opening. In the normal or correct position of the rack, the bottom edges of the teeth hang free of the flooringof the alley and the spherical balls or game pieces 35 are arranged in the spaces between the teeth to provide targets against which the cue-ball is forcibly driven. The sides of the rack crosshead may be clothcovered to save the cue ball from injury. rllhe width of the space is less than the diameter of the target-ball, which is inserted therein from the side facing` the alley-ways, thus making it impossible for a ball to slip through the rack to the op posite side. A suitable number of spaces are provided to correspond with the alley ways lili;

liti

Aril) grr (iii

1 ,essere v of the receiving chamber so that when the balls are arranged in the rack, there will be a ball opposed to each alley way. The ends of the rack are preferably hinged or pivoted in b ackets 36 of the side rails, so that it can be swung upwardly from the alley or playing space whenever desired. A stop 36 prevents the rack from swinging too far back toward the cue-ball end of the same. The rack swings one way only, viz, toward the receiving chamber and a coil spring S at each end tends to yieldably and tensionably hold it down in place between the rails. The end teeth of the rack or target holder are adapted to lit close up against the inside face of the adjacent side rail and also assist in holding the rack firmly in place between the rails during the playing of the gaine` At the apex of each triangular frame a tip or chair 37 formed and serves as a seat for a single game piece distinguished by color or otherwise from the other game pieces andr called for convenience the cueball. This chair serves to hold the cueball at the apex of the triangular frame and is slotted, as at 38, to permit the gun-cue of the shooting device to strike the cue-ball without interference.

The mechanism consists of a gun having a plunger or cue 39 slidably mounted through the sectional gun barrel 40 and having at one end a cue-tip 41 and at the other end an operating handle 42. The gun-barrel is composed of a dome-shaped casing forming the top and sides, and a base plate having 11p-standing end pieces flanged for connection to the dome casing as shown to advantage in Figure 6. The game table has two depressions formed therein below the surface and providing recesses or compartments 43 for housing the tallying mechanisms of the guns and over the recesses are placed roofing plates 44 arranged flush with the surface of the table. Over each of these plates a gun device is mounted for pivotal movement, the base plate of the gun-barrel restingupon arcuate bearing guides 45 dise posed under opposite ends of the barrel and rigidly fastened to plate 44. The guides and plate 44 are correspondingly slotted, as indicated at 46 in Figure l to provide slide ways for the lugs 4.7 of the gun-barrel base plate; a washer 48 and pin lock 49 preventing the lug from pulling loose from the slide ways. These slide ways it is to be noted, are so arranged as to permit adjustment of the gun about a vertical axis or the shifting of movement when sighting the cue for playingthe cue-ball against a target-ball. A collar 50 is rigidly mounted upon the cue and constitutes an abutment for one end of a yieldable spring 5l and the other end ofthe spring bears against one of the end pieces so that it iscompressed when handle 42 is drawn back. When the handle sreleasehthe reaction of the spring throws the cue forwardly so that it strikes the cue-ball with considerable force. Depending from the collar 50 is a socket portion 52 which receives one end of a trigger 53. The trigger is vertically movable in the socket and is prevented from dropping out of the same by a cross rod which works in a slot formed transversely through the trigger. This arrangement 1s` indicated in the dotted line structure of Figure 6. A spring 54 normally tends to hold the trigger downwardly while bearing lugs proj ecting outwardly from opposite sides of the trigger limit its upward movement. Both base plate and roofing plate are slotted to receive the trigger as shown at 56 and along opposite edges of the base-plate slot inclined surfaces 57 are provided and cooperate with the bearing lugs o-f the trigger for raising the latter as the gun is cocked, and after the tallying mechanism has been operated thereby.

The tallying` mechanism is contained within a casing 58 which fits into recess 43 and on one side of the gun. This casing is fastened to the roong plate as indicated at 59 and supports a pair of vertically disposed shafts 60 and 61. 'Shaft 60 may be termed a shot-gear shaft and shaft 6l the gamegear shaft. The shot-gear shaft has a large ratchet wheel or gear 62 lreyedto revolve therewith and underlying the smaller ratchet wheel 63 rigid with thev shaft 6i. Keyed to shaft 60, above the ratchet wheel, is a single-tooth gear or dog 64 which engages the smaller ratchet wheel or gamegear 63 once in every complete revolution of the large wheel. A dial plate 65 is supported on the upper end of shaft 6()k and is provided wit-h numbers ranging consecutiva ly from 1 to l2 to correspond with the num ber of ratchet teeth. It is however," to be understood that gears with more or less teeth or notches may be employed and that in all cases the numbers of the dial correspond with the number of ratchet teeth or notches. A pointer 66 is attached to the upl. l l) per end of shaft 60 and moves in a circle if overa dial face G7, painted or otherwise formed on the bottom'wall of the dial case into two compartments for separately housing the two dial faces and as may be clearly understood from Figure 7, the uppermost housing 69 is open and the dial face clearly visible through the opening, while the lower housing TO has merely a sight open--` ing 7l through which the dial numbers are visible one at a time as the shaft revolves. Arranged between the trigger of the gun and the larger ratchet wheel 62 is an operating lever 72. @ne end of this lever is fixed preferably about shaft 5G as a pivot, and the other end terminates in a trip arm 7 3 disposed in the path of the trigger when the latter is drawn back in cooking the gun. A spring pressed pawl 74 arranged on the underside of the operating lever normally engages the teeth of the ratchet wheel 62 and moves it up a notch as the operating lever is swung back. After the lever has been swung back the necessary distance, the lugs of the trigger strike the inclined surfaces 57 and lift the trigger up and away from the operating lever which is then drawn back to its original position by a resetting spring 7 5; the pawl, of course, riding over the ratchet teeth. Stops 7 6 and 77 prevent any reverse rotation of the ratchet wheel. Thus, every time the gun is drawn back for a shot, the stopgear G2 is moved up a notch with a corresponding movement of the pointer 6G which indicates or records the number of shots taken at any given time. Twelve shots ordinarily constitute a game and by the time the shot gear has made a complete revolution, that is, has been moved twelve times, the tooth gear 64 moves with the shaft and will have engaged and moved the smaller or game gear but one notch; the number appearing at the sight opening indicating that a corresponding number of games has thus been concluded. ln such a Way a correct tally is kept of this number of games play-ed in any series and also a record of the shots taken.

ln the playing of the game, the spotting rack is filled with balls and the cue-ball is seated in the chair in front of the gun. The object of the game is to drive all or as many as possible of the balls from theA rack into the alley ways respectively aligning therewith, a sight is tak-en on one of the rack balls through the cue ball. Each rack ball may be impelled only into the alley way corresponding thereto and is to be driven from the rack by driving or shooting the cue ball against it. The game is usually started by shooting the cue ball against the center one of the rack balls, in an effort to drive it into the centermost alley way, after which the balls may be driven successively from one end of the rack.` In the present instance, the alley ways are given a rating of 45 points each; the center one having tvvo values since itconstitutes the first and fifth alley in the series. Unless the rack balli enters the corresponding alley way no score is counted, while balls striking against the guide rails and bounding back toward the rack are considered as dead balls. and have no scoring value. rhese dead balls together with those returning through the gutters may be subsequently replaced .in the rack for the continuance of the game, it being recalled that a player has twelve shots in which to pile up scoring points. A game may be limited to any number of points de sired and the scoring values of' the respective alley Ways may be varied as desired.

The points scored upon the entrance of any game piece into an alley way is automatically registered by the blinding of the scoring eye as previously explained. It is obvious that the character of the game played may be varied from time to time and that. the use of the rack may be dispensed with altogether if found undesirable,l by merely swinging it upwardly from the p1aying surface.

Associated with each triangular frame of the game table is a device for resetting the scoring eyes. This consists in a bar 7S resting in a groove formed transversely through supportingl blocks 25 and below the eye blocks; the ends of the bar being connected to operating rods 79 slidably mounted thro-ugh brackets 80 and having hand grips 81 at their free ends so that they may be conveniently reciprocated back and forth. l/'lhen a player draws the operating rod towards himself, the resetting bar strikes against the arms of the scoring eyes and moves them forwardly until the numbered ends of the eyes are clearly visible through their respective frames.

rllhe foregoing description and the accom panying drawings have reference to the preferred or approved embodiment of my invention. It is to be understood however', that such changes may be made in construction and arrangement of parts, materials, dimensions, etc., as may prove expedient and fall within the scope of the appended claims.

The present invention is allied with that shown in'iny applications Serial No. 375,001, filed April 19, 1920 and Serial No. 503,206, iiled September 26, 1921.

Having thus fully described my invention, what I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent is z- 1. In a game apparatus, a receiving chamber provided with a passageway having an entrance and an exit, a scoring eye slidable in the chamber, an arm extending froml the scoring eye into the entrance so that game pieces passing therethrough will abut the arm so as to move the scoring eye, and cushion means on the eye.

2. In a game apparatus. a receiving chamber provided with a passageway having an entrance and an exit, a scoring eye slidable in the receiving chamber` a spring element for preventing accidental movement of the scoring eye, and an arm extending from the scoring eye into the entrance of said chamber so that game pieces passing therethrough will abut the arm so as to move the scoring eye.

3. In a game apparatus, a receiving chamber provided with a passageway having an entrance and an exit, a scoring eye slidable in the receiving chamber, a spring element for preventing accidental movement of the scoring eye, an arm extending from the scoring eye into the entrance so that game pieces passing therethrough will abut the arm so as to move the scoring` eye, and cushion means carried on the arm.

et. In a game apparatus having a rectangular surface, a receiving chamber extending widthwise at one end of the surface having a plurality of entrances and an exit, scoring` eyes slidable in said chamber, arms eXtending` from the scoring eyes into the entrances, and game pieces adapted to engage the arms to urge the` eyes rearwardly.

5. In a game apparatus having a flat rectangular surface tilted toward one enc lengthwise, a receiving chamber traversing the width of one end of the surface having entrances and an exit, the exit communicatingwith he opposite end of the surface through a gutter, scoring eyes slidable rearward in Said chamber, one above each entrance, arms depending from said eyes, and game pieces adapted to roll through the entranc-es and about the arms to urge the eyes rearwardly.

6. In a game apparatusl having a rectangular surface tilted lengthwise toward one end, a receiving chamber at the raised end extending widthwise and having entrances and an exit, part of the surface of the apparatus sloping toward the entrances, the exit communicating with the opposite end of the apparatus through a gutter, said chamber having slotted sockets above the entrances, scoring eyes slidable in said sockets, arms depending from said eyes, and spherical game pieces adapted to roll into the entrances and engage the arms to move the eyes rearwardly,

7. In a game apparatus, a rectangular surface tilted lengthwise toward one end, a receiving chamber at the raised end extending widthwise and having entrances and an exit, a `gutter extending longitudinally in said chamber from end to end, part of the rectangular surface sloping toward the entrance and merging into the gutter, said chamber having slotted sockets above the entrance, scoring eyes slidable in said sockets, arms depending from said eyes, spherical game pieces adapted to roll into said gutter, and means for engaging said arms to move the scoring eyes forward after the latter have been urged inwardly.

S. In a game apparatus having a rectangular surface tilted lengthwise toward one end, a receiving chamber at one end of the surface having entrances and an exit, spherical game pieces, scoring eyes slidably mounted in said chamber, arms depending from said eyes, said eyes being adapted to be urged rearwardly by the game pieces when the latter roll into the entrances, a resetting bar mounted in said chamber being adapted to engage the arms of the eyes to move the latter forwardly, and means for actuating said bar.

9. In a game apparatus having a rectangular surface tilted lengthwise toward one end, a receiving chamber at one end of the surface having entrances and an exit. spherical game pieces, scoring eyes slidably mounted in said chamber, arms depending from said eyes` said eyes being adapted to be urged rearwardly by the game pieces when the latter roll into the entrances, a resetting -bar mounted in said chamber being adapted to engage i he arms of the eyes to move the latter forwardly, said bar extending longitudinally in said chamber rearward of the arms depending from the eyes, and an operating rod attached to one end of said bar for urging the latter forwardly when pulled.

IO. In game apparatus having a rectangular surface tilted lengthwise toward one end, a receiving chamber at one end of the surface having entrances and an exit, spherical game pieces, scoring eyes slidably mounted in said chamber, arms depending from said eyes, said eyes being adapted to be urged rearwardly by the game pieces when the latter roll into the entrances, a resetting bar mounted in said chamber being adapted to engage the arms of the eyes to move the latter forwardly, said bar extending longitudinally in said chamber rearward of the arms depending from the eyes, an operating rod attached to one end of said bar for urging the latter forwardly when pulled, said bar being mounted in a groove passing longitudinalhr through the chamber, an operating rod extending from one end of the bar parallel to the length of the rectangular surface and exterior of the playing surface, brackets supporting said rod, and a hand grip at the far end of said rod for operating the latten l1. A gam-e comprising a table having end and side gutters, separate fenced-in playing spaces provided upon the table, a receiving chamber over the end gutter and accessible from both playing spaces, shooting devices associated with each playing space for iinpelling game pieces into the common receiving chamber, and means within the chamber for separately indicating the individual scores made at the two playing spaces.

In testimony whereof I affix my signature.

MARION MILEVSKI.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2502084 *Jul 30, 1945Mar 28, 1950Eugene A QuarriePower-factor corrected transformer
US2710755 *May 11, 1953Jun 14, 1955Craig Ralph WGame board device
US4054287 *Feb 12, 1976Oct 18, 1977Adolph E. GoldfarbToy amusement arcade
Classifications
U.S. Classification273/119.00R
International ClassificationA63F7/00
Cooperative ClassificationA63F7/0005
European ClassificationA63F7/00B