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Publication numberUS1600496 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 21, 1926
Filing dateNov 28, 1923
Priority dateNov 28, 1923
Also published asDE438498C
Publication numberUS 1600496 A, US 1600496A, US-A-1600496, US1600496 A, US1600496A
InventorsWeiskopf Charles H
Original AssigneeInt Precipitation Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Apparatus for electrical precipitation of suspended material from gases
US 1600496 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Sept. 21 1926. 1,600,496

C.. H. WEISKOPF' APPARATUS FOR ELECTRICAL PRECIPITATION 0F SUSPENDED MATERIAL FROM GASES Filed Nov. '28, 1925 2 Shets-Sheet 1 F295 my! ATTORNEY Sept. 21 1926.

c. FLWEISKOPF APPARATUS FOR ELECTRICAL PRECIPITATION OF SUSPENDED MATERIAL FROM GASES Filed Nov. 28, 1923 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVEN TOR Charles usl o of 9/ 4/ 0 ATTORNEY Patented Sept.

UNITED STATES PAT CHARLES H. WEISKOPF, 0F HAWTHORNE,

TIONAL PRECIPITATION COMPANY, OF LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA, A CORPORA- TION OF CALIFORNIA.

APPARATUS FOR ELECTRICAL PRE This invention relates 1,600,496 ur OFFICE. v

CALIFORNIA, ASSIGNOR TO INTERNA- CIPITATION or SUSPENDED MATERIAL FROM eases.

Application filed November 28, 1923. Serial No. 677,474.-

to an electrical precipitating apparatus of the so-called mulwhich a plurality of vertiple pipe type in tical pipes or flu which the gas to be treated is con es are pro vided through ducted and is subjected to electrical precipitating operathrough said pipe or flues.

tion while passing Such precipitating ap paratus also comprises discharge electrodes extending in said pipes or flues, a being maintained electrodes and the opposing which serve as c to effect the electri pipes or flues, trodes, so as tatmg operation.

The main object of the is to provide for suitable high p otential difference between said discharge walls of the ollecting eleccal precipipresent invention improved construction of such precipitating apparatus whereby the pipes or flues of the electrical precipitator are constructed at minimum expense. v

of the invention is to pro- A further object vide an electrical precipitator ple pipe type wherein of the multithe walls or pipes or flues are formed as separate elements capable thereby facilitating the of the electrodes required fo provide improved cleaning means electrical precipitator.

The accompanying dra bodiments of my thereto Fig. 1 is a plan an electrlcal precipitator,

1-1 in Fig. 2.

Fig. 2 is a side elevation partly in vertical section on the line Fig. 3 is a transverse ver independent vibration or movement, 1arrmg or movement r cleaning the for an wings illustrate em invention and referring view partly in section of 22 in Fig.1.

the line 3-3 in Fig. 2.

i1 section on line 4-4 in Fig. 4 is a deta Fig. 2.

Figs. 5 and 6 are horizontal ing modified arrangements of the members.

Figs. 7 and 8 are enlarged plan and ver--.

taken on the line tical section on sections showelectrode tical sectional views of the form'of the invention shown in Fig. 9 1s a side Figs. 1 to 3. elevation of one o f the collecting electrode elements shown in Fig. 8.

Fig. 10 is a horizontal section of a.1nodi' fication as hereina fter referred to.

precipitated material. The inlet 2 is shown the lower portion of the precipL- as entering tating chamber and the said chamber is shown as open to the atmospheric air at its upper end, but it will be understood that any suitable arrangement of the gas supply and delivery means may be provided for conducting the gases vertically through the precipitator chamber in either upward ordownward direction. \Vithin the precipitator chamber 1 are mounted a plurality of col lecting electrodes in such a manner as to form a plurality of vertical pipes or fines of square cross section. Said electrodes preferably consist of vertical plates 5 of sheet metal having flanges 6 secured thereto and extending at right angles to the sheet metal plates 5. In the form of the invention shown in Figs. lto 3 and 7 and 8, the flanges 6 are of a width nearly equal to the distance In the form of the invention shown in Fig. 5

also of a width nearly between the plates, llllt are all on alternate plates, the intervening plates indicated at 5 being not flanged. In the form of the invention shown in Fig. 6 the flanges indicated at 6 are on all the plates but extend only halfway or somewhat less than halfway across the space between the plates, being arranged opposite one another on adjacent plates so as to form a more or less complete partition across the space between the plates. In any one of these embodiments of my invention the effect of the flanges 6 is to divide or partition the spaces a series of vertical flues of square cross section, said flues being open at their lower ends into the gas receiving space at the bottom of the precipitator chamber 1 and open at their upper ends into the outer air or the said flanges 6 are equal to the distance between the plates intoas to provide for free into "suitable gas delivering means. The

main plates 5 of the electrodes are supported within the chamber 1 in any suitable manner, for example, as shown in Figs. 7 and 8, each plate 5 may with angle iron plates 7 which serve as substantial closure means for the ends of the respcctii e spaces between the plates and said main plates 5 are further provided at each end with a top angle iron section 8 secured to the angle iron 7 aforesaid, and having its horizontal flange resting on the top of a horizontal beam 9. which is supported by a ver tical bar 10, said bar 10 being secured at its lower end to a supporting beam 11 extending'outside of the precipitator chamber.

The'connection between the bars 10 and the supporting means 11 is preferably such movement of the said parts relative to the walls of the chamber 1 and at the same time prevent leakage of gas throughsaid walls- For this purpose bar 10 may be connected to the beam 11 by means of bolts 12 extending through openings 13 in the wall of the precipitator, said openings being sufiiciently large to permit free movement of the bolts 12 therein. Suitable packing such as an asbestos plate 14 may extend over these openings and around the bolts 12 to close the joint against leakage of gas. The supporting beams 11 rest freely on brackets 16. see Figs. 1, 2, and 4, extending from the wall or frame of the precipitator and may be connectedtogether at their ends by cross beams 17.

- The discharge electrode system may com prise vertical discharge electrode members such as wires, rods, or chains 19' extending vertically and axiallywithin the respective vertical fiues aforesaid, and supported at their upper ends on suitable cross bars 20 which are carried by beam 21 (or, in case of a large precipitator, a plurality of such beams) mounted on insulators 22 which are carried by the cross beams 17 aforesaid. Any othersuitable construction of the dis charge electrode and supporting means therefor, may however, be used: The discharge electrodes may be spaced or retained in'pos'ition at their lower ends by a spacing frame 23 supported by vertical bars 24. The beams 11 and 17 constitute a supporting frame for the collecting electrodes and the beams 20 and 21 constitute a supporting frame for*the discharge electrodes.

It will be seen that the above described construction provides collecting electrode elements which are assembled to form a plurality of vertical flues arranged in compact order with no waste spaces between the flues and at the same time a certain amount of freedom of movement is provided for the electrode elements whereby ,they-may be readily jarred or agitated for the purpose of removing deposited material therefrom.- In

be provided at each end beam 11 at the side the construction of multiple flue precipitators h objection has existed that by reason of the rigidity and mass of the assembled construction effective .jarring or agitation of the structure for the purpose of removing deposited matter is a matter of some difficulty, but by mounting the elements loosely as above described. it is possible to jar such elements either simultaneously or successively so as to effect removal of deposited material therefrom.

Any suitable means jarring the collecting electrodes but'I pre-- fer to provide means as shown in the drawing for simultaneously jarring both the discharge electrode and the collecting electrodes. For this purpose a hammer pact member shown as 26 may be pivotally mounted at 27 on the supporting beam 11 at each side of precipitator chamber 1, said hammer being adapted to be operated in the collecting electrode may be provided for or 'immanner of a pendulum and to strike the.

of the precipitator so as to jar said beam thereby jarring both the collecting electrode system resting on said beam through the medium of the bars 10 and the discharge electrode system supported by said beams through the medium of the insulators 22 and the cross beams 17. The hammers 26 aforesaid may be operated either manually or mechanically as may be desired.

In some cases it is desirable to provide for passage of gas to be treated between adjacent vertical flues and for this purpose the flanges 6 aforesaid forming the cross walls or partitions are preferably made somewhat shorter than the distance between themain electrode plates 5 as above stated so as to permit gas to pass between the edges of the flanges nd adjacent plates and thereby equalize t pressure and the gas velocity through th fines of the precipitator. In order to provide for such passage of the gas and at the same time properly support and space the main electrode plates I may provide straps flanges 6 and projecting beyondthe outer edges thereof, so as to touch or approach closely to the opposing electrode plates 5, said flanges being, however, unattached at their outer edges to permit free vlbration of the flanges and plates. In order to prevent warping said straps may be guided in U-shaped lugs 29 on the opposing plates (as shown in Fig 10) in such manner that lateral deforma- 125- 30 attached to the respective to the opposing plates, so as plates 5 with these straps, said straps also serving as reinforcing or stiffening means for the said flanges.

Suitable electric connections are provided for maintaining the high potential difference between the discharge electrode system and the collecting electrode system, the collecting electrode system being for example grounded but the discharge electrode system being connected through a suitable rectifying means to the high tension side of a stepup transformer for example as set forth in U. S. patent to F. G. Cottrell, No. 895,729., August 11, 1908. v

In the operation of the invention the gas to be treated is passed vertically through the precipitator flues aforesaid and is subjected to the action of an electrical field produced in said flues between the discharge electrodes and thecollecting electrodes with the result that solid or liquid material suspended in the gases collects on the walls of the sa d flues and in case, of materhl deposited 1n this manner is solid and adherent to the electrodes it may be dislodged from time to time by operation of the jarring means above described. In such jarring operation the loose mounting of the electrode plate members 5 on the supporting beams 9 and. the loose mounting of the-supporting beams 11 on the supports enables-free jarring or free vibration of both the collecting electrode system and the discharge electrode system by the operation of the hammer means.

\Vhat I claim is:

1. In an electrical precipitator a plurality of collecting electrode members formed as parallel vertical plates flanges extending transversely thereto, and dividing the spaces between said plates into vertical flues, said flanges being free from attachment at their outer edges to said plates, so as to permit of free vibration of said plates and of the flanges thereon.

2. In an electrical precipitating apparatus a gas receiving chamber, parallel vertical plates mounted in said chamber and having vertical flanges, said plates and the said flanges thereon dividing the interior of said chamber into a plurality of vertical flues and said flanged plates forming collecting electrodes, and being mounted independently of one another to provide for free viv bration thereof;

An electrical precipitator comprising a gas rece1vmg chamber, aplurahty of collecting electrode members 1ndependently mounted in said chamber and formed with vertical portions extending transversely to one another to form a plurality of collecting electrode flues, and insulated discharge electrodes mounted in such a manner as to extend Within said collecting electrode flues, said members being sufliciently separated to provide for free vibration thereof.

having vertical 4. An electrical recipitator comprising a gas receiving cham er, a plurality of collecting electrode members independently mounted in said chamber-and formed with vertical portions extending transversely to oneanother to form a plurality of collecting electrode flues, and insulated discharge electrodes mounted in such a manner as to cx, tend Within said collecting electrode flues, said members being sufficiently separated to provide for free vibration thereof, and also to provide for circulation of gas between adjacent flues.

5. In an electrical precipitating apparatus, supporting means, an electrode supporting frame mounted to rest freely on said supporting means, collecting electrodes carried by said supporting frame, insulators carried by said supporting frame, a discharge electrode supporting frame mounted on said insulators whereby jarring of said supporting frame operates to jar both the collecting electrodes and the discharge electrodes.

6. A construction as set forth in claim 5 and comprising in addition jarring means independently mounted adjacent to said supporting frame and adapted to strike the same in the operation of said jarring means.

7. In an electrical precipitator', supporting means, an electrode supporting frame resting for free movement on said supportv ing means, collecting electrodes supported freely by said electrode supporting frame so as to enable free vibration of said collecting electrodes, and means for jarring said supporting frame.

8. A construction as set forth in claim 7- and COIIIPI'ISIIIg' 1n addition insulators carried by said electrode supporting frame, a discharge electrode frame carried by said insulators and discharge electrodes mounted on said discharge electrode frame so that jarring of said electrode supporting frame operates to jar both the collecting electrodes and-the discharge electrodes.

9. An electrical preclpitating apparatus comprising a gas receiving chamber, supports located outside of said chamber, an electrode supporting frame extending outside of said chamber and resting freely on said supports, means connected to said electrode supporting frame and extending within said chamber and provided with collecting electrode supports, a plurality of collecting electrodes independently mounted on said collecting electrode supports and resting freely thereon to provide for free vibration of said collecting electrodes, and closure means for preventing leakage of gas where the said electrode support-ing mean-s passes through the wall of the gas receiving chamber. a

10. A construction as set gforth in claim 9 and comprising in addition insulators electrodes outside of the gas receiving chamb mountedon said electrode supporting frame outside of the gas receiving chamber, a discharge electrode frame mounted on said insulators and discharge electrodes mounted on said insulators and extending over a plurality of collecting electrodes and discharge carried by said discharge electrode frame and extending in opposition to the collecting electrodes.

11. A construction as set forth in claim 9 and comprising in addition insulators mounted on said electrode supporting frame er, a dis-. charge electrode frame mounted on said in- .collecting electrodes sulators and extending over a plurality of and discharge electrodes carried by said discharge electrode frame and extending in opposition to the collecting electrodes, hammer means movably mounted in position to strike said ele'ctro e supporting frame outside of the gas receiving chamber to jar said frame and the collecting and discharge electrodes carried thereby. 7

' In testimony whereof I have hereunto subscribed my name this 21st day of November,

CHARLES WEISKOPF.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2509901 *Jul 31, 1947May 30, 1950Smidth & Co As F LElectric precipitating apparatus
US2555339 *Aug 27, 1946Jun 5, 1951Research CorpDisposable electrode assembly
US2722992 *Feb 10, 1954Nov 8, 1955Research CorpRapping device
US3200565 *Jul 10, 1962Aug 17, 1965Svenska Flaektfabriken AbElectrostatic precipitators
US3678653 *May 11, 1970Jul 25, 1972Buschman Elmer WElectrostatic precipitator
US4007023 *Jul 11, 1975Feb 8, 1977Metallgesellschaft AktiengesellschaftElectrostatic precipitator with collector-electrode spacers
US4478614 *Dec 3, 1982Oct 23, 1984Jonelis John AElectrostatic precipitator construction having spacers
US4479813 *Nov 29, 1982Oct 30, 1984Jonelis John AElectrostatic precipatator construction having ladder bar spacers
US4647296 *Nov 8, 1985Mar 3, 1987Mississippi Power CompanySpacers for straightening warped precipitator curtains
US4765802 *Jul 15, 1987Aug 23, 1988Wheelabrator Air Pollution Control Inc.To maintain a pair of adjacent plates in a horizontally spaced relationship
US5529608 *May 13, 1985Jun 25, 1996Jonelis; John ASpacer assembly for use in electrostatic precipitator
USRE32767 *Jan 7, 1985Oct 18, 1988 Electrostatic precipitator construction having ladder bar spacers
Classifications
U.S. Classification96/33
International ClassificationB03C3/76, B03C3/34
Cooperative ClassificationB03C3/76
European ClassificationB03C3/76