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Publication numberUS1600776 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 21, 1926
Filing dateJun 24, 1924
Priority dateJun 24, 1924
Publication numberUS 1600776 A, US 1600776A, US-A-1600776, US1600776 A, US1600776A
InventorsAnthony Peron
Original AssigneeAnthony Peron
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Cooking apparatus
US 1600776 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Sept. 2T 1926. 1,600,776

PERON COOKING APPARATUS Filed June 24, 1924 4 Sheets-$heet INVENTOR A ORN Sept. 21 1926.'

A. PERON COOKING APPARATUS Filed June 24, 1924 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 WI m ' ATTORNEY 1 Patented Sept. 21, '1926.

UNITED ANTHONY PEBON, OF NEW YORK, N. 'Y.

cooxnm APPARATUS.

Application am June 24,1924. Serial No. verses.

Some of the important objects of this invention are to provide practical and efficient,

iii;

apparatus for effecting various cooking erations, such as are required to meet var ing demands in restaurant operation.

pecial objects also are to make the apparatus attractive for displa and advertising urposes; to provide for t e removal of obectionable burning or cooking odors, to enable all parts of the device being readily kept clean and sanitar to provide for cooking by either gas or e ectricity, or both, and to facilitate the control and the carrying out of the various operations.

The foregoing and other objects are attained in this invention by means of certaln novel features of construction, combinations and relations of parts as disclosed in the following specification.

In the drawings accompanying and forming part of this specification, only one practical embodiment of the invention is illustrated and it is therefore to be understood that the structure may be varied without departure from the broad spirit and scope of the invention as hereinafter defined and claimed.

Figure 1 is a perspective view of the complete installation as viewed from the front.

Figure 2 is an enlarged broken detall of the flexible shaft drive and clutch for the broiler.

Figure 3 is a rear elevation of the apparatus.

Figure 4 is a horizontal sectional view as on substantially the plane of line 4-4 of Figure 3.

Figure 5 is a broken part sectional longitudinal view of the apparatus on an enlarged scale.

Figure 6 is a partly broken view of the control and exhaust flue end of the apparatus.

Figure 7 is a vertical sectional view on 45 substantially the plane of line 77 of Figure 5, and

Figure 8 is a broken sectional detail of the yielding pan support. As shown in the general View, Figure 1, 50 it will be seen that the apparatus is in the main, a range-like structure provided at the top with a grating 10 beneath which are a series of individually controlled gas burners 11 which can be used for such purposes as are generally carried on on the top of the stove. Below the open .flame burners are the oven chambers which are shown providedwith "the glass front panels 12, 13 for attracting interest to the cookin operations.

One of the special structura features isthat the frame of the device is made u of tubular elements which are utilized as ues for promoting the circulation and for carrymg off the waste gases and cooking odors. These combined structural and flue elements consist in the illustration of the four tubmlar corner posts 14 connected in spaced reltion at the front and the rear by the tubular side bars 15, 16, all being shown as made' of the same size square stock and joined by suitable means such, as welding or by coupling sleeves 17 entered at the joints between the legs and the side rails. These parts pro vide the main strength of the frame, but as many other braces and connecting pieces may be used, as found necessary, such as the several angle pieces designated 18.

The oven chambers are shown in Figures.

5 and 7 as defined by the transparent front panel .12, the rear hinged panel or door 19, the bottom plate. 20, top plate 21 and end plates 22. The sides of the structure are extended below the bottom of the oven to define a chamber 23 for the burners 24:, the.

ends of this chamber being defined by the end wall 25 and an intermediate wall 26, both extending from front to back of the structure and spaced ,from the oven end walls 22 to provide upright full width flues 27 extending from the open burner chamber up to a full width flue 28 over the top'of the oven and provided by a plate 29 spaced above the oven top.

This construction provides for a circulation of the hot products from the burners across the bottom, up over the ends and across the top of the oven chamber, as indicated particularly by the arrows in Figures 4, 5 and 7. The waste gases are exhausted from the flue space over the oven down through an opening 30 in the top of the rear I flue bar 16, which is connected with one end of a header 31 provided with a draught pipe 32 leading to an-exhaust fan 33. The downtake 30 is provided in the flue bar substantially mid-length the oven so as to draw the ends of the two streams from conflicting.

Two ards 34, are shown extending I diagona 1y from opposite sides of the top passage 28, 'Figure4, the first of these servmg to deflect the stream rising at the right directly to the down-take and the other op-- erating to turn the uprising stream at the left awa from the down-take so that it will be forc to swin around and more nearly coincide with the first flow before passing on to the down-take.

To carry oil the cooking odors the front flue bar 15 which extends along the front of the oven is equipped with an outlet or outlets 36 in the bottom of the same and this pipe is connected with the opposite end of the manifold or header 31. I

The flow of combustion and cooking gases may be controlled by suitable valves or dampers such as the slide shown at 37 evernin the passages 36 in the bottom 0 the oven flue and actuated by a pinion 38 enga ing a rack 39 on the edge .Of the slide, sa1'd pinion being carried by a shaft 40 provided with an operating handle 41 located in convenient reach at the back of the oven. During cool in operations this damper may remain close or only partly open but when theoven is opened, this damper preferably is o ened wide to carry off the cooking gases and so prevent a rush of heat and cooking odors HItO the room.

For baking or roasting operations, suitable pans such as indicated at 42 in Figure 7 may be used, but for broiling operations, a special basting pan such as shown at 43 may be'employed. This pan is shown as of semi-cylindrical form and seated in the forks or yokes 44 on the upper ends of rods 45 sliding in guides 46 extending up through the bottom of the oven. The lower ends of these rods are shown as resting on rock arms 47 projecting inward from the rock shaft 48 carrying at its end, an arm 49 provided with a roll 50 riding on the periphery of a heart shaped cam 51 from w llcll it will be seen that upon every revolution of the heart cam, the basting pan will be graduall I raised and then again gradually lowered A clutch or other control device may be provided, if desired, for rendering this basting means inoperative when its use is not required. The pan is preferably removable from the supporting yokes 44 and these may be removed from the oven by simply lifting them out of their slide bearings The drive for the heart cam is shown as a sprocket wheel 52 fast on the shaft 53 which carries the cam and engaged by a chain 54 driven by a sprocket pinion 55 on the shaft 56, the latter being shown as operated by flexible shafting 57 detachably the rear Wall of the oven. holding arms of the forks are shown as coupled thereto at 58 and extending from a conveniently su ported motor 59 which is shown supporte on a wall at thejback of the apparatus.

:The spit 60 is shown as of angular cross section and as removably supported within -the oven chamber in line with the drive shaft by means of rollers 61 slipped over the ends of the spit and resting on spaced supporting rolls 62. To hold the spit rollers down on the bearing rolls, forks 63 are shown, each having an arm to extend over and into a groove 64 in the spit collar and having a handle 65 extending out through These upper sliding in bearings 66 on the same brackets 67 in which the bearing'rollers are journaled so that said holdingdevices will readily slide back and forth for the purpose of holdin or releasing the spit.

A c utch connection is shown provided Letween the drive shaft and spit in the form of a sleeve 68 journaled in'a bearing 69 in the end wall of the oven and having a squared or angular bore to slidingly fit over the squared or angular end portion 70 of the drive shaft and the squared or angular end of the spit, said sleeve being shiftable from the position shown in Figure 2, where it is housed in its bearing inwardly into engagement over the end of the spit, or vice versa, by a shifting fork 71 having a relatively rotatable engagement with a collar 72 on the outer end of the clutch sleeve.

This construction makes it possible to readily couple or uncouple the spit with respect to the drive shaft.

For the broiling operations an electric heater is usually employed, the same being shown as consisting of a series of heating coils 73 supported beneath a reflector 74 in the top of the oven chamber and controlled, preferably in sections, by a suitableswitch or switches 75 located conveniently on the end of the oven structure.

By the proper control of the heating coils, the broiling operation may be carried on at the proper rate and when the basting mechanism is employed, the pan will be automatically lifted to haste the fowls or other food on the spit, once to every predetermined number of revolutions of thespit. Usually it is suflicient to baste the products about once to every fifteen turns and the sprocket gearing is shown as propolrtioned to effect approximately this resu t.

The upper burners 11 are shown as individually controlled by valves 76 connected with a header 77, and similarly, the lower burners are controllable by individual valves 78 connected with a lower header 79. In addition to the selective control, the oven burners are shown as controllable as a unit 4 by means of master valves 80 located near possible to carry out all of the various cookthe o osite ends of the header 79 so that varia e degrees of heat may be a plied to different portions of the ovens an then if desired, such heat may be either decreased or diminished in the different parts of the oven, all at once. To equalize the gas supply, the headers may be joined together at opposite ends by ipin 81 and the supply pipdiing 82 may be roug tin at one of suc en s.

To catch any overflow or splash from pots and pans over the upper burners, relatively shallow water pans 83 are shown supported immediately below the upper burners and removable through a way 84 in the rear wall of the apparatus.

A finish is provided about the top of the apparatus by upwardly extended end walls 85 connected by a wall 86 shown as rearwardly offset at 87 to enable it to catch any overflow such as might be occasioned by boiling operations on the top of the apparatus.

The electric heater may be used alone or in conjunction with the gas burners, but when not in use and the as burners are in service, the coils are pre erably covered to prevent accumulation of grease or moisture thereon by a relatively close-fitting cover plate 88 slidin in guides beneath the coils and withdrawa le through a slot in the back of the oven as indicated in Figure 7.

A window 89 may also be provided in the door or rear wall of the oven chamber for observing cooking operations, and thermometers 90, Fig. 7, or other indicating instruments may be provided for indicatlng oven temperature or other conditions.

The invention, it will be seen, makes it ing operations required in restaurant service and the device is readily controlled to secure just the results desired. The structure is strong, simple and compact, easily ke t clean and sanitary and is attractive for d15- play purposes. Furthermore, the cooking operatlons can be. carried on without objec tionable odors or release of heat from the oven.

To prevent injury to the basting mechanism 1n the event of the basting pan being lifted into engagement with the material on the spit, the supporting rods are shown as of yielding telescopic construction, Figure 8 with expansion sprin s 91 inside the tubular telescopically relate parts, 45, 45, the lower sections 45 being in the form of sleeves closed at their lower ends to remain resting on the rocker arms. 47 when the upper sections 45 are lifted out of the same, the springs being pinned to these upper sections at 92 so that they too will be lifted out when theflbasting mechanism is removed from the oven.

The springs are properly tensioned so as to support the usual amount of liquid at the level to properly cooperate wlth the material on the spit but adapted to yield at a relatively slig t additional pressure so that the pan w1ll automatically yield immediately it comes in contact with an extra large fowl or other matter on the spit.

To conserve the heat, the end walls 25 and top wall 29 defining the flue assages at the ends and over the top of t e oven chamber are preferably lined with asbestos or other thermal insulating material, as indicated at 93. This lining on the top wall prevents absorption of too much of the heat yliihe water pans 83 supported on this top wa As the s it is supported at its opposite ends'on rol ers, it turns easily and smoothly and is held against accidental, dislodgement by the overstanding arms of the hooks or forks 63. The sp1t is readily removable at any time, however, after the clutch sleeve 68 is withdrawn as in Figure5, by simply pushing in the hooks 63 to carry the overstanding portions thereof clear of the bearin rolls 61 on the ends of the, spit.

hat is claimed is:

1. Cooking apparatus comprising a supporting frame including longitudinally extending tubular bars at the front and. the rear of the structure, a manifold at one end of the structure in communication with the ends of said tubular frame bars, an exhaust flue connected with said manifold, an oven chamber open into one of the tubular frame bars and a heat conducting flue extending over the top of the oven chamber and open to theother tubular frame bar.

2. Cooking apparatus comprising a supporting frame including longitudinally extending tubular bars at the front and the rear of the structure, a manifold at one end of the structure in communication with the ends of said tubular frame bars, an exhaust flue connected with said manifold, an oven chamber open into one of the tubular frame bars, a heat conducting flue extending over the-top of the oven chamber and open to the other tubular frame bar and a damper controlling the opening into one of the frame bars.

3. Cooking apparatus comprising corner posts connected by tubular'side bars to form part of a sup-porting frame work, an oven supported by said frame work, a combustion chamber and oven heating flues supported by the frame work, one of the tubular frame members having an exhaust opening leading into the oven chamber and another of the tubular frame members having an opening to one of the oven flues and an exhaust congllb connected with the tubular frame mem 4. Cooking apparatus comprising a frame including substantially rectangular hollow corner posts connected by similar hollow frame bars provided one with an open ng 1n the top of the same and the other with an opening in the bottom of the same, an oven chamber in communication with bottom opening, an oven flue in communicat on with the top openin' and damper mechanlsm controllingone o said openlngs.

5. Cooking apparatus having a frame work includin hollow corner posts connected by hollow frame bars, an external, manifold connectin the hollow frame bars, an exhaust conduit extending from the manifold, an oven chamber open to one of the ho]- low frame bars and an oven flue open to the other frame bar.

6. Cooking apparatus having a frame -work including hollow corner posts connected by hollow frame bars, an external manifold connecting the hollow frame bars, an exhaust conduit extending from the manifold, anoven chamber open to one of the hollow frame bars, an oven flue open to the other frame bar and exhaust mechanism connected with the exhaust flue.

7. In cooking apparatus, an oven chamber, a gas burner for heating the same, an elec tric heater within the oven chamber, means for selectively controlling either or both the burner and electric heater and movable partition means for separating the electric heater from the oven chamber when only the burner is in use.

8. In cooking apparatus, spaced supporting rollers, a spit having a. roller element removably engaged thereon and resting on the supporting rollers and a slidably guided rod shiftable into and out of position over the removable roller element.

9. In cooking apparatus, a supporting frame work including tubular frame members, an oven chamber below said tubular members, a flue extending over the top of the oven chamber opening into one of the tubular frame members, the other tubular frame member being 0 en to the oven chamber and a burner chain r in communication with the flue which extends over the oven chamber.

10. In cooking apparatus, an oven chamber, a burner chamber beneath the oven chamber, flues extending from said burner chamber up past the ends and over the top of the oven chamber, an exhaust conduit in communication. with said top flue at a point intermediate the ends of the oven chamber and bafiles at opposite sidesof said top'flue for directing the gases from the end flues to the exhaust flue.

11. In cooking apparatus, an oven chamber, a burner chamber beneath the oven chamber, flues extendin from said burner chamber up past the en s and over the top of the oven chamber, an exhaust conduit in 'end flue toward the exhaust fiueand to direct the gases from the opposite end flue away from the exhaust flue. 12. In cooking apparatus, an oven chamber, hollow flue bars in the upper portion of the same, electric heater units in the space between said hollow flue bars, one of said flue bars being open to the oven chamher for exhausting the oven gases, an external burner for heating the oven and a slide operable between the flue bars to shut off the electrical heater units from the interior of the oven.

13. In cooking apparatus, a rotating spit, a basting pan, and means for conjointly turning the spit and automatically raising and lowering the basting pan toward and away from said spit.

14. In cooking apparatus, a rotary spit, a cam shaft, speed reduction gearing from the rotating spit to the cam shaft, a basting pan'and cam means driven b the cam shaft for alternately raising an lowering the basting pan.

15. In cooking apparatus, an oven, a spit removably journaled in said oven, a basting pan removably supported in the oven and means for rotating the spit and for automatically raising and lowering the basting pan.

16. In cooking apparatus, the combination with a rotatable spit and a basting pan, of means for efl'ecting relative motion of said basting pan and rotatable spit toward and away from each other and a yielding connection interposed in such means for preventing injury to the parts in the event of contact between the basting pan and material on the spit.

17. In cooking apparatus, a rotatable spit and a basting pan, means for alternately raising and lowering the basting pan toward and away from the spit and yieldable connections in such means for preventing injury to the parts in the event of contact between the pan and material on the spit.

18. In combination with a rotatable spit, a basting pan, yieldable supports for said pan and raising and lowering mechanism engaged with said yieldable supports.

19. In combination with a rotatable spit and a basting an, yieldable supporting means for one 0 such parts and, means for effecting relative motion of such parts toward andaway from each other.

20. In cooking apparatus, an oven chamber, aheat flue extending over the top of said oven chamber, rectangular tubular frame members in the upper corners of the oven chamber, one open to the heat flue and the other open directl to the oven chamber and an exhaust mani old at one end of the apparatus, open to the ends of both said tubular frame members.

21. In cooking apparatus, tubular corner posts, tubular front and rear frame mem bers connected With said posts and having extensions through two of the corner posts, exhaust connections engaged with such extensions, an oven chamber open to one of the tubular frame members and a heat flue open to the other tubular frame member.

22. In cooking apparatus, tubular corner posts, tubular front and rear frame members connected with said posts and having extensions through two of the corner posts, exhaust connections engaged with such extensions, an oven chamber open to one of the tubular frame members, a heat flue open to the other tubular frame member and damper mechanism for controlling entry into one of said tubular frame members.

23. Cooking apparatus comprising in combination a stove structure having a supporting shelf in the upper portion of the same,

a shallow water pan slidably and removably supported on said shelf, burners directly over said water pan, an utensil supporting grating above said burners and constituting the top of the stove structure and an upstanding apron about the edges of said grating for returning overflow from cooking utensils to the water an.

In witness whereo I have hereunto set my hand this 6th day of June, 1924:.

ANTHONY PERON.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2687080 *Jan 30, 1952Aug 24, 1954Marcel Dorin EtienneSpit for roasting
US3499380 *Oct 6, 1967Mar 10, 1970Gongwer Nelson LAutomatic food cooking machine
US4158992 *Jun 17, 1977Jun 26, 1979Malafouris Dannie OCombination hibachi-type grill and rotisserie
US7934494 *Oct 10, 2003May 3, 2011Donna Gail SchneiderCollapsible heating apparatus
US20110011387 *Jan 20, 2011Jerry SawayaMultiple function cross-draft convection oven/grilling system
Classifications
U.S. Classification99/345, 99/421.00H, 126/41.00B
International ClassificationA47J37/04
Cooperative ClassificationA47J37/041
European ClassificationA47J37/04A