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Publication numberUS1601527 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 28, 1926
Filing dateJul 12, 1920
Priority dateJul 12, 1920
Publication numberUS 1601527 A, US 1601527A, US-A-1601527, US1601527 A, US1601527A
InventorsGodfrey Edward J
Original AssigneeGoodyear S Metallic Rubber Sho
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Hand bag and method of making same
US 1601527 A
Abstract  available in
Images(5)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Sept. 28 1926.

E. J. GODFREY HAND BAG AND METHOD OF MAKING SAME Filed July 12, 1920 5 Sheets-Shoot l Sept. 28 1926. 1,601,527

E. J: GODFREY BAND BAG' AND METHOD OF MAKING SAME Filed July 12. 1920 5 Sheets-Sheet 5 3& hi1 attovnua- Sept. 28,1926. 1,601,527

. E. J. GODFREY HAND BAG AND METHOD OF MAKING SAME 7 Filed July 12, 1920 5 Sheets-Sheet 4 $14 hi4 alto nu g Sept. 28 1926.

v 1,601,527 E. J. GODFREY HAND BAG AND METHOD OF MAKING SAME Filed July 12 1920 5 Sheets-Sheet 5 Patented Sept. 28, 1926.

warren STATES 1,601,527 PATENT OFFICE.

EDWARD J. GODFREY, OF NAUGATUCK, CONNECTICUT, ASSIGNOR TO THE GOODYEABS METALLIC RUBBER SHOE COMPANY, A CORPORATION OF CONNECTICUT.

HAN D BAG AND METHOD OF MAKING SAME.

Application filed July 12,

This invention relates to a hand bag and the methodof making the same, more particularly to a bag made of vulcanizable material.

The various forms of hand bags, such as travelling bags, combination travelling bags, English kit bags, and Boston bags have previously been largely made of leather, while attempts have also been made to make them of various compositions in imitation of leather. The price of high-grade leather suitable for making these bags has reached a prohibitive figure, and bags made of a cheaper grade of leather or of imitations are lacking in durability and in the fine appearance of the higl1-grade leather bag.

The high-grade bags are very carefully stitched and owing to the cost of good workmanship and good thread, added to the previously mentioned high cost of good leather, they cannot be put upon the market at a price low enough for the average buyer. The cheaper grade leather bags and those made of imitation leather are generally of very poor workmanship, and while they are sold at a more reasonable figure their lack of durability and poor appearance makes them an unprofitable investment at any figure. Moreover none of the bags previously mentioned are water-proof.

An objectof my invention is to provide a strong, durable hand bag of good appearance and which can be produced at a reasonable cost. I

Another object is to provide a bag which can be rapidly made, is water-proof, and does not require the use of mechanical means to hold its parts together.

Still another object is to provide a bag of vulcanizable material, the parts of which are integrally united by vulcanization.

A further object is to provide a bag construction, the parts of which can be largely built up in the flat and then rapidly assembled on a form.

A still further object is to provide a simple, rapid and inexpensive method of male ing these bags.

For a full and complete disclosure of the invention reference is had to the accompanying specification and drawings, in which latter Fig. 1 is a diagrammatic transverse see- 1920. Serial No. 395,650.

tion through a travelling bag made according to my invention; a

Fig. 2 is a horizontal section through the lower portion of the bag;

Fig. 3 is a layout illustrating the manner in which the side wall of the bagis built up in the flat;

b Fig. 4 is a perspective of a completed ag; e

Fig. 5 is a detail perspective;

. Fig. 6 an illustration of a built up cor-' ner reinforcement.

Fig. 7 is an enlarged section illustrating the construction of the outer cover;

. Fig. 8 is a similar section through the lining of the bag;

Fig. 9 is a similar section through the lower vertical portion of the wall of a bag;

Fig. 10 is a similar section through the upper flexible portion of the bag wall;

Fig. 11 is a diagrammatic transverse section through a combinationv travelling bag;

lg. 12 is a horizontal section through the lower member of the bag shown in Fig. 11;

Fig. 13 is a perspective of the completed combination bag;

Fig. 14 is a view showing the construction of the side Wall reinforcement for the lower. section of the bag;

F ig. 15 is a transverse diagrammatic section through an English kit' bag;

Fig. 16 is a horizontal section through the lower portion of the bag;

b Fig. 17'is a perspective of a completed s;

Fig. 18 is a broken away perspective illustrating the hinge construction of the bag frame;

Fig. 19 is a transverse tion of a Boston bag;

Fig. 20. is a horizontal section through the lower portion of the bag;

Fig. 21 is, a perspective ofa completed Boston bag;

Fig. 22 is a detail perspective of the hinged frame construction; and

Fig. 23 is a detail of the inner strap retaining member.

Referring to the drawings, 1 represents a sheet of the lining used in the bag, which lining is a composite sheet formed of fabric 2 frictioned on one side at 3 as shown in Fig. 8. The term frictioned is commonly applied in the art to fabric which has been diagrammatic seccoated with rubber by passage between two co-acting rolls, one of which is driven at a higher speed than the other. The sheet is of a length sufficient when its ends are lapped to form the interior lining of the bag, and of a width somewhat greater than the depth of the bag. This sheet is slitup from its bottom edge in four places as shown at atin Fig. 3 to form openings in which the ends of the side pocket walls maybe inserted. Each side pocket wall is formed by doubling over a sheet 5 of the frictioned lining with its frictioned surfaces in contact, a strip 6 of rag stock being inserted at the upper end of the doubled over portions to form a reinforcement for the upper edge of the pocket wall, while one edge 7 of the doubled over strip 5 projects below the other one as shown in Fig. 1. Each pocket wall is disposed with its ends 8 projecting through the slits t to the frictioned side 3 of the sheet 1, as shown in Fig. 3, and the joints are then covered by strips of ordinary friction stock 9. The liningstrip 1 has also been previously slit to allow the insertion of the securing flap 10 for the side pocket wall, a reinforce 11 being disposed below the inserted end of said flap as shown in Fig. 1. The flaps 10 may be applied to both pocket walls or entirely omitted, as desired. The lower or vertical wall portion of the bag requires a relatively stiff reinforcement, and this reinforcement is provided by strips 12 of cardboard or other suitable material of the proper height and length, which are first cemented on both sides and covered on one side by friction stock 13, the latter being coated. on both sides as shown at 13 and 13 in Fig. 9. Two of the friction coated cardboard strips are placed end to end upon the lining sheet 1, and two strips of high-grade rag stock 14 of the same length as the cardboard strips but of greater width are disposed end to end on the lining sheet 1 with their lower edges in contact with the-upper edges of the friction covered cardboard strips 12. It will be noted from Fig. 3 that one end 15 of the lining sheet 1 projectsbeyond the reinforcements, while at the opposite end the cardboard and rag stock reinforcements project beyond the lining sheet as shown at 16 and 17 respectively, and the reinforcements are also so disposed that the lower edge of the lining sheet 1 projects below the cardboard reinforcement as shown at 18, as does also the projecting portion 7 of the side pocket walls. A strip of ordinary friction stock 19 is then laid over the vertical joints of the rag stock and cardboard reinforcements, and rivets 20 are preferably applied at the ends of the side pocket walls to more securely hold them, a similar rivet being also applied to the end of the side pocket flap 10. The outer covering of vulcanizable side with ordinary friction stock 31.

material for the bag is next applied. This covering is a composite sheet (see Fig. 7) consisting of a, suitable fabric 21 such as twill, which is coated on one side with a rubber composition 22 and on its outer side with a rubber composition 22, which latter is of such a nature as to suitably withstand the wear to which it is exposed. The outer covering material may be embossed in imitation of any desired grain. Two sheets 23 and 24 of the outer covering material are provided, the sheet 23 having one edge doubled under as shown at 25 in Figs. 2 and 3, and the doubled under portion being lappedover the adjacent edge of sheet 2%. The sheet 23 projects somewhat above the sheet 24t at its upper edge, while the lower edges of the sheets are in alignment and are doubled under as shown at 26 in Fig. 3. The composite outer cover thus formed after being cemented on its inner side is disposed upon the rag stock and cardboard reinforcements with its lower doubled under edge 26 projecting somewhat beyond the lower edge of the cardboard reinforcement. The sheet 24 has previously been slit near the middle of its upper portion and a bag flap inserted in the slit, this bag flap being formed of doubled over rag stock 27 covered with the outer covering material as shown at 28 in Fig. 1.

The composite sheet thus formed is then passed through pressure rolls to firmly unite the parts, which completes the assembly in the fiat of the side wall of the bag. The ends of the composite sheet are then brought together, the ends of the frictioned lining first lapped and the butted ends of the cardboard and rag stock reinforcements being covered with a strip of friction stock 19, and the free end of the outer cover sheet 23 doubled under as shown at 29 in Fig. 2 and lapped on the corresponding free end of the sheet 24;. V

The tubular side wall member thus formed is inverted and placed upon a rectangular form of the proper size with its bottom edges turned upward and projecting slightly above the bottom of the form. A bottom reinforce for the bag provided which consists of a sheet of cardboard 30 cemented on both sides and covered on one This bottom reinforce is placed upon the bottom of the form with the friction covered side face down, and the projecting edges 7 of the side pocket walls and the projecting edge 18 of the frictioned lining 1 are then lapped over and rolled down on the reinforce as shown in Fig. l. A sheet 32'of the outer covering material is cemented on its inner side and rolled down on the exposed cardboard face of the reinforce 30, the corners of the projecting edge of the outer side wall cover are slit down tothe form and the doubled over edge portions 26 rolled down and cemented to the sheet 32. Corner reinforcements are then applied, each consisting of a piece of rag stock 33, a piece of friction stock 34, and one of gum 35 in superposed relation as shown in Fig. 6, each reinforcement being cemented to a corner and folded down as shown in Fig. 4 with the gum side 35 outward. The bag is then removed from the form and the hinge frame attached. Each hinge frame consists of a pair of U-shaped angular steel members 36 the ends of which are hinged together as shown in Fig. 5, one of said members being somewhat larger in order to allow the other to telescope within it. The hinge frame is first covered with friction stock 37 and then coated with cement, and the extended frame placed within the bag at the top of the lining sheet 1 and rag stock 14. The upper edges of the outer cover sheets 23 and 24 are then rolled down over the frame and carefully fitted to it as shown in Fig. 1, the sheet 23 being of somewhat greate width, as before stated, in order that suiiicient material may be provided to cover the larger member of the hinge frame. A stitching tool may be used to firmly unite the parts and to imitate the sewing of a leather bag, as indicated at 38 in Fig. 4-. Adjacent the hinge joints a reinforce 39 of gum stock is applied to the lining 1, and immediately under the hinge an opening 40 is cut in the wall of the bag and a binding 41 of gum applied around the edge of the opening, all as shown in Fig. 5. This avoids strain on the bag wall when opening. or closing the bag. The bag is then folded to finished shape as in Fig. 4, and allowed to stand in this condition for some time, as over night, which aids in preventing the bag from breaking and cracking at its folded end portions during use. The bag is then opened out to its full extent, temporary corner braces put in, and a sheet of cardboard placed within its open mouth in order to keep it in shape while it is being varnished, which latter operation may be performed in any desired manner as by spraying, dipping, or brushing. The bag is then cured and after curing it is supplied with the regular hardware, such as a handle, lock, side fasteners, and bottom studs, and a false bottom is inserted, the same consisting of a sheet 42 of cardboard or other suitable stiffening covered on its upper side with a sheet of frictioned lining 43.

In Figs. 11 to 14 a combination travelling bag is shown, which consists of an uppe bag portion similar in general construction to the travelling bag just described, but with its bottom elevated somewhat above the bottom edge of the side wall in order to provide for the telescoping therein of a bottom section which is hinged to the upedge to the scored portion.

per section. In orderto provide sufficient strength in the side wall of the upper or bag portion to hingedly secure the lower section thereto, the lower vertical reinforcement of the bag wall is preferably made of filbre board 44 completely covered witl friction stoclr 45. The bottom of the portion which, as before stated, is elevated somewhat above the bottom edge of the wall, is formed of a sheet of tar board 46 covered on its upper side with frictioned lining 47 and the projecting edges 7 and 18 respectively, of the side poclretwalls and lining are lapped over and rolled down in a similar manner to that employed in building up the travelling bag. The lower edge 48 of the outer cover is then folded around the projecting bottom edge of the wall reinforcement and cemented to the bottom,

and a bottom sheet 49 of the outer cover material is then cemented and rolled down on the bottom and inturned edge 48 of the side wall cover.

The bottom section has a relatively stiff side wall reinforcement, which is formed from two strips of cardboard 50 each of which is scored on line adjacent and parallel to its upper edge as indicated at 50 in Fig. 14, and each strip is also provided with two outout portions 50 extending from its upper Each strip is covered on both sides with friction stock 51, and on each end ofthe strip the doubled friction stock overlaps and is rolled together as shown at 52 in Figs. 12 and 14. Two overlapped friction stock portions 52 are then overlapped, and an outer cover 53 formed of two lapped sheets of the covering material is then cemented to the fric tion covered reinforcing members 50, and the free ends of the reinforcing members and outer cover joined show in Fig. 12, the overlapping ends of the outer cover being doubled under as shown at 54 in a manner similar to that in which the bag portion is constructed. The tubular member thus formed is bent to an approximately rectangular-shape as in Fig. 12, and a bottom reinforce inserted within its lower edge, this bottom reinforce consisting a cement coated rectangular sheet of tar board 55 bound around its edges with friction stock 56. The bottom section is then inverted on a. form of the proper sha e, an outer bottom piece 57 of the cover material is cemented on and rolled down, the corners of the projecting edge of the outer cover are slit down to the form, and the doubled under edge portions 58 cen'iented and rolled down on the sheet 57. Cornet: reinforcements 35 similar in all respects to those used in the travelling bag, are applied to the lower corners of the lower section, the section removed from the form, the friction stock 51 and outer cover 53 cut away at the (Ell cut-out portions and the side wall reinforce at the upper edges of the four side walls slightly bent in along the line of the scoring 50. A rectangular steel frame 59 is covered with friction stock 60 and after cementing is disposed at the top of the side walls and the upper edge of the outer wall covering 53 rolled down over the frame. Corner reinforcements 35 consisting of gum only are applied to the four upper corners of the lower section. The sections are then cured, the inner side walls are covered with frictionedlining 61, and a false bottom consisting of a sheet of stiff paper 02 covered with frictioned lining 63 is put in. The sections are then connected by hinges, and the rest of the regular hardware applied to the bag.

In Figs. 15 to 18 an English kit bag is shown, which is in general of the same construction as the travelling bag shown in 1. As, however, the side wall of this bag is flexibly reinforced throughout, the cardboard reinforcements 12 are omitted and the rag stock reinforcements l-l-' extend all the way to the bottom of the bag. In. all other respects the side wall construction is the same as that of the ha shown in Fig. 1 and the bottom is attached in the sane manner. A different form of closure or ninge frame is provided for th bag, the same consisting of straight side pieces 6st and 65 of angled steel, to each end of which are pivotally connected angled members 06 which in turn are pivotally connected at their opposite ends as shown in Fig. 18. Hence in closing this bag all that is necessary is to buckle or bend in the pivoted members 66 at their connecting point, thereby allowing the smaller side piece 65 to telescope within the larger one. 'l he hinge frame is covered with friction stock 67 and then cemented and set in position at the top of the lining 1 and rag stock 1% and the upper edges of the outer wall covering rolled over and snugly fitted in the same manner as the hinge frame of the bag shown in l. leinforce members are applied to the lower corners of the bag, which members are in all respects similar to those applied to the travelling bag. Reinforce members 68 of gum are also applied to the ends of the side hinge pieces 64 and (SS-as shown in Fig. 17. The bag is varnished and cured in the same manner as the travelling bag and a false bottom comprising a sheet 69 of stiff paper covered on its upper side with frictioned lining 70 is inserted, after which the usual hardware is applied.

In Figs. 19 to 23 a small hand bag known as a Boston bag is illustrated. The side wall of this bag is built up in the flat in somewhat the same manner as the travelling bag shown in 1 and consists of an inner sheet 71 of frictioned lining, a flexible reinforce 72 of rag stock which is in one piece and extends from top to bottom of the wall, and an outer sheet 7 3 of the cover material which is also in one piece. The ends of the one piece outer cover sheet 73 are lapped at 7% in the middle of the side wall instead of in the end wall and the outer lap is not doubled under as in the other constructions. The bottom reinforce consists of a sheet 75 of tar-board covered on one side with a sheet 7 6 of the frictioned lining material and is joined to the lower end of the side pocket wall and the lower edge of the lining 71 in the same manner as the travelling bag shown in Fig. 1, a bottom sheet 77 of the outer cover material being then cemented and rolled down on the bottom reinforce 'and the doubled under edges 78 of the outer wall material being rolled down also in the same manner as the construction shown in Fig. 1. A somewhat different hinged closure frame is provided, the same consisting of channeled steel member 79 hinged together, which i 's are covered with friction stock 80. andle members 81 are provided, each cong of strips of the outer cover material roll. up into circular form with their ends 82 left flat. The side wall cover 7 3 is slit near its upper edge and each flat end 82 of the handle members inserted through a slit and covered with a reinforce 83, and arivet- 8i secured through the side wall cover 73, flatteneo end 82, reinforce 83, rag stock 72, lining 71, and friction covered frame member 7 9. The upper edges of the outer cover 73 are rolled down and fitted to the frame. members 7 9 in a similar manner to that employed with the other bags. A retaining strap for the bag is provided, said strap being built up from a strip 85 of the cover material, the edges of which are doubled under and a second strip 86 of the cover material superposed thereon as shown in Fig. 20. The composite strap thus formed is cemented to the bag in superposed rela tion to the overlap 7 1.- of the outer cover, and may .be riveted to the hinged frame at the top and to the bottom reinforce. At the opposite side of the bag a buckle 87 is provided, the strap of which is formed of a doubled under strip 88 and superposed strip 89 in a similar manner to the previously described strap. The doubled ends of the bucirle strap are inserted in a slit in the outer cover 7 3 and covered with a reinforce 90, and a rivet 91 may be employed to aid in holding the strap in place. Previous to the assembly of the side wall the lining sheet 71 is provided with a retaining loop for the strap when the same is not in use, said loop being formed by doubling under the edges of strip 92 of the outer cover material and inserting its ends through slits 93 in the lining, rivets 94 being employed to securely hold the ends in place. Adjacent the pivot point of the hinge members 79 a reinforce 95 of gum is applied to the lining sheet 71, and a slit 96 is made in the wall of the bag at a point directly beneath the pivot points in order to provide flexibility when closing the bag. A false bottom consisting of a sheet of stiff paper 97 covcred on its upper side with a sheet 98 of the frictioned lining is also inserted in the bag after curing. The varnishing and curing of the is effected in a manner similar to that employed with the other bags.

It will be seen that by my invention a hand bag is produced which can be quickly and economically made, is strong, durable and water-proof, of good appearance, which does not depend upon mechanical fasteners to hold the parts together, and which can be largely built up in the flat from preformed parts without requiring the use of highly skilled labor.

Yv hile specific embodiments of the various bags have been shown and described it is obvious that numerous modifications in the parts and the method of assembling them may be employed without departing from the spirit of the appended claims.

Having thus described my invention what I claim and desire to protect by Letters Fatent is 1. A seamless handbag having inner bottom and side Walls of friction stock, an outer covering for said walls of embossedvulcanizable material, and a relatively stiff re1nforcement for the bottom and lower side walls and a flexible reinforcement for the upper side walls disposed between said friction stock and outer covering, the whole vulcanized together to form a one piece body.

2. A handbag formed of built up plies of vulcanizable material and a hinged closure frame, the hinge halves of said frame being formed of angled stock, the upper edge of the outer ply being folded over and entirely covering the frame, and all the parts being integrally united by vulcanization.

3. A method of making handbags which comprises, building up outer side and bottom wall coverings of vulcanizable material on inner reinforcements, adhesively connecting the side and bottom wall structure by staggered and lapped joint-s spaced from all ed 'es, and vulcanizing to produce a seamless, unitary article.

4. A method of making handbags which comprises assembling in the fiat a complete side wall element and an incomplete bottom element of vulcanizable material, partially connecting the two on a form, finishing the bottom element and completing its connection with the side wall element, and integrally uniting the parts by vulcanization.

5. A method of making handbags which comprises, building up the walls, bottom, and inner side wall pockets of plies of vulcanizable material, uniting a hinged closure frame to the bag by folding the upper portions of the side wall completely therearound, and vulcanizing to integrally unite the parts.

6. A method of making handbags which comprises, building up in the flat a side wall structure comprising a lining and an outer wear resisting sheet of Vulcanizable material, bending the composite sheet thus produced around a form and joining its enos, applying to the bottom of the form a reinforced lining and an outer surfacing of wear resisting vulcanizable material and joining the same to the side wall, and vulcanizing the bag.

7. A method of making handbags which consists in superposing an inner lining and an outer wear sheet of vulcanizable material, bending the sheets around a form of the proper size and joining the ends of the respective sheets, placing a bottom reinforce on the bottom of the form, lap-ping over the inner lining sheet thereon, superposing an outer bottom wear piece of vulcanizable material, lapping over the edges of the outer wear sheet thereon, reinforcing the corners, removing the bag from the form, and vulcanizing.

8. A method of making handbags which comprises securing inner pocket walls to one side of a sheet of frictioned lining, superposing a reinforcement on the other side of the sheet, superposing an outer wear sheet of vulcanizable material on the reinforcement, bending the composite sheet thus formed around a form and joining its ends to form the side wall of the bag, building up an inner bottom piece of frictioned lining and reinforcing material and applying the same to the bottom of the form, lapping over the side wall sheet of frictioned lining on the bottom piece, applying an outer wear piece of vulcanizable material to the bottom, lapping over the side wall wear sheet, reinforcing the corners with vulcanizable material, and vulcanizing the whole into a unitary structure.

9. A method of making handbags which comprises superposing in the fiat plies of composite fabric and rubber and reinforcing material to form a side wall element and side pockets, rolling to compact the parts, joining the ends of said element, securing thereto a bottom element of composite rubber and fabric and a reinforcing material, and vulcanizing to unite the parts into a waterproof whole.

Signed at Naugatuck, county of New Haven, and State of Connecticut, this 7th day of July, 1920.

EDWVARD J. GODFREY.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3023867 *Mar 18, 1960Mar 6, 1962Henry L KotkinsLuggage construction
US4951818 *Jun 29, 1989Aug 28, 1990Alan JohnsonEquipment carrier and method of using same
Classifications
U.S. Classification190/127, 190/110, 190/124, 190/104
International ClassificationA45C13/04, A45C13/00
Cooperative ClassificationA45C13/04
European ClassificationA45C13/04