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Publication numberUS1601774 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 5, 1926
Filing dateMar 12, 1925
Priority dateMar 12, 1925
Publication numberUS 1601774 A, US 1601774A, US-A-1601774, US1601774 A, US1601774A
InventorsScheffer Carl F
Original AssigneeScheffer Carl F
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Vacuum tool
US 1601774 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

7 Oct. 5 1926. 1,601,774 x z c. F. SCHEFFER VACUUM TOQL Filed March 12. '1925 1N VENT 0R,

' 4A; A TTORNE Y Patented Oct. 5, 1926.

CARL F. SCHEFFER, 0F DAYTON, OHIO.

VACUUM TOOL Application filed March 12, 1925. Serial No. 15,128.

My invention relates to new and useful improvements in vacuum tools, and has particular reference to a tool of this kind for cleaning carpets, rugs and like coverings.

It is one of the principal objects of my invention to provide a vacuum tool which will roll easily and smoothly over a carpet, rug or the like without pulling up its threads or nap. The carpet or other floor covering will not stick to the cylinder, making it unnecessary to tack or otherwise fasten the carpet or rug down while it is being cleaned. Nor is it necessary to lift the tool from the floor to frequently disengage the fabric from it, since the suction passage or throat which I provide is so constructed or arranged that only the portion of the apertured cylinder which at the time directly engages the carpet or other covering is in communication with it. Immediately afterthe portion of the surface'of the cylinder that has engaged the covering, leaves the latter, its connection with the suction passage is broken, so that there is no further pull upon the covering to cause the latter to stick to the cylinder. Thus, when a carpet, rug or other floor covering is cleaned by my vacuum tool, it does not have to be fastened down, nor is there any danger of the threads and nap being pulled into the cylinder after that portion of its surface which is in engagement with the covering, has passed or cleared the suction passage.

Other important and incidental objects will be brought out in the following specification and particularly set forth in the subjoined claims.

In the accompanying drawings, Figure 1 is an elevational'view of my improved vacuum tool, showing the apertured cylinder or roller and the supporting yoke. Figure 2 is a sectional view taken on the line 22 of Figure 3, showing the suction passage or throat and the cylinder mounting means. Figure 3 is an end view of my vacuum tool. And Figure 1 is a cross sectional view taken on the line 44 of Figure 1, showing the suction passage or throat within the cylinder.

Referring to the accompanying drawings for a detailed description of my invention, the numeral 1 designates an elongated chan nel member which is substantially U shaped in cross section. This channel member 1 is formed with hollow trunnion ends 2, 2 which communicate with the legs of a tubular yoke 3 through holes 4:, 4 in the lower inner porchannel member 1 is an inner bearing race 6 for balls upon which is mounted an outer race Each outer race 8 is suitably secured within a respective end of a hollow cylinder or roller 9 to permit the latter to turn freely around the channel member 1 for a purpose to be hereinafter described.

The curved wall of the cylinder 9 is formed with suction apertures -10 which extend all the way around it between the trunnion ends 2, 2 of the channel member -1. These trunnion ends, together with curved flanges 11, 11 upon them, close the ends of the apertured cylinder 9.

The cylinder 9 being free to turn around the trunnion ends 2, 2 of the channel member 1, upon balls 7 or any other suitable bearings that may be employed, it may be easily rolled over a floor covering such as a rug or carpet by the suction handle 5 of the yoke 3. By means not shown, a suction is created through the handle 5, yoke 3 and channel member 1 to draw through that portion of the apertured cylinder 9 which is over the latter at the time, dust and dirt from the covering over which the cylinder is rolled. (See Figures 2 and 4:.)

Since the channel member 1 is never open to more than-a small longitudinal portion of the curved apertured wall of the cylinder 9, and that portion being the part'of the surface of the curved cylinder wall which is in direct contact with the covering over which the cylinder is rolled, the suction between the channel member and said portion of the cylinder wall will be broken directly it has passed the open end of said channel member. This channel member being connected to the legs of the yoke at its trunnion ends, it

is at all times possible, by means of the suction handle 5, to position the channel member so that it will be open to that portion of the curved apertured wall of the cylinder which is in direct contact with the covering over which it is being rolled. After it has passed the open end of the channel member, the portion of the apertured wall of the cylinder in direct contact with the rug or carpet will cease to exert a pull upon it, with the result that it will not stick to the cylinder nor pull threads and nap from it. Therefore, the covering over which the cylinder is passed need not be fastened down, nor is it necessary to frequently lift the vacuum tool to disengage the covering from it. lVithal, my vacuum tool has a smooth, easy and uniform movement over the covering being cleaned, and one which will not injure it.

Having described my invention, I claim:

1. In a vacuun'l tool, a hollow cylinder adapted to travel over a covering, said cylinder being closed at each end and having its curved wall apertured, a suction member around which said cylinder turns, said suction member formed with a slot at its lower side through which it is only open to the cylinder, and handle means in suction communication with said suction member for positioning the latter to bring its slot over that portion of the cylinder which is in direct contact with the covering.

2. In a vacuum tool, a hollow cylinder adapted to travel over a covering, said cylinder being closed at each end and having its curved wall apertured, a suction member around which said cylinder turns, said suction member having a slot at its lower side along which it is only open to the apertured cylinder wall, and a tubular yoke communicating with, and fixedly secured to, said suction member to position the latter to bring its slot over that portion of the cylinderwall which is in direct contact With the covering.

3. In a vacuum tool, a hollow cylinder adapted to travel over a covering, said cylinder being closed at each end and having its curved wall apertured, a channel suction member within said cylinder, said channel member having aslot at its lower side along which it is only open to the apertured cylinder wall, trunnion ends on said channel member around which said cylinder is free to turn, a tubular yoke whose ends are secured to, and communicate with, the trunnion ends of said channel member, and a hollow handle in suction communication with said yoke.

in testimony whereof I have hereunto set my hand this 7th day of March, 1925.

CARL F. SCHEFFER.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
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Classifications
U.S. Classification15/415.1, 15/422
International ClassificationA47L9/02
Cooperative ClassificationA47L9/02
European ClassificationA47L9/02