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Publication numberUS1601775 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 5, 1926
Filing dateAug 2, 1924
Priority dateJun 17, 1924
Publication numberUS 1601775 A, US 1601775A, US-A-1601775, US1601775 A, US1601775A
InventorsScherieble Otto
Original AssigneeScherieble Otto
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Manufacture of soap in cake form
US 1601775 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct.5,1926. "1,601,775

' O. SCHERIEBLE MANUFACJTURE on SOAP IN CAKE FORM Filed August 2, 1924 In vex/far.-

p/fa ILZerzEZZQ Jffa 1* y Patented Oct. 5, 1926.

UNITED STATES OTTO SCHERIEBLE, OF ESSLINGEN-ON-THE-NECKAR, GERMANY.

MANUFACTURE OF SOAP IN CAKE FORM.

Application filed August 2, 1924. Serial No. 729,825.

This invention relates to the manufacture of soap and more particularly to the manufacture of soap for toilet purposes. Heretofore it has been customary to provide a cake of soap of one colour and permeated with a single perfume. The present invention has for its object a process for the manufacture of soap, more especially toilet soap preferably shewing a plurality of colours and having one or more than one perfume permeating the cake of soap as a whole.

Soaps have already been produced which shew several different colours but in these soaps the variegated nature of the soap has generally been obtained by embedding small pieces of soap in a mass of soap as a whole. The variegated nature of the resultant soap is inferior and does not extend throughout the entire mass of soap. For example, the coloured layers of soap alternate with the white layers of soap so that the variegated nature, of the soap does not extend homogeneously through the entire mass of the soap. Besides, this method of production has the disadvantage that the cake of soap when in use splits up into pieces due to the fact that thelayers are not completely secured throughout. The existing corners and edges are unsuitable for handling and are also disagreeable to the touch and the crumbling of the soap into several parts is accompanied by considerable waste.

The present invention avoids these disadvantages by reason-ofthe fact that a homogeneous cake of soap is"'produced. The process of the present invention is extremely simple to carry out. It consists conveniently in that the soap in powdered form coloured and perfumed in known manner is separately assembled in juxtaposition according to the different kinds and disposed in a I press. The press is provided with partition walls or a mold which are inserted therein before filling in the soap, the various quan tities of the coloured and perfumed soap being filled in thereafter. After filling in the several quantities of soap, the partition walls are remo'vedso that the several quantities of coloured and powdered soap, although lying directly adjacent each other, are quite separate. The soap is now subjected to pressure in a manner which is well known and combined to form an insoluble whole at which stage in the process the cake of soap is complete. After having been subjected to pressure the differently coloured parts of the soap remain separate from one another without oo-mingling or. runnin one into the other which, if such did taEe place, would produce a badly coloured and obnoxiously smelling soap.

In soaps produced in accordance with the present invention the coloured portions of the soap extend throughout the entire mass and the perfume or perfumes likewise extend throughout the mass of the soap or the individual parts of which the soap 1s made. Such soaps are pleasing to the eye and besides soaps can be produced which, by reason of the mixed arrangement of the differently coloured soap parts, have the appearance and also the fragrance of a nosegay. Enumerable arrangements of the coloured soap pieces may be made without limit.

The main advantage of soap produced in accordance with the present invention consists in that it does not lose its scent or colour after being used once, but such colour and scent persist until the entire cake of soap has been used up, and when in use an agreeable fragrance is produced. In fact. according to the nature of the colour and the method of arranging the various coloured parts of the soap in the mass as a whole, a gradual change in the perfume can be produced as the soap diminishes by use. soap parts may be arranged in stratified layers.

It is already known to mix or blend several perfumes and to perfume the soa with thescent thus obtained, but in suc case the perfumes applied to the soap are. individually and separately imperceptible in the finished cake of soap because there is produced a new definite scent whereby a fragrance is obtained having the same effect as that which can be perceived from a nosegay composed of different fragrant flowers.

In order that the invention may be clearly understood reference is made to the accompanying drawing which shews several constructions by way of example in accordance with the present invention.

Figure 1 is a perspective View shewing a cake of soap in which the differently colon red and perfumed parts a, (z? of the soap are juxtaposed.

Figure 2 is a perspective view shewing a cake of soap in which the powdered soap is superimposed in two layers a, a

For example, the diiferently coloured I Figure 3 is a perspective view hewing a cake of soap in which three different layers a, a a are used.

Figure 4 is a perspective view of a cake of soap in which the differently coloured and perfumed parts a, a which extend through the entire mass are assembled to form a homogenous cake of soap.

Any desired number of colours may be used as well as any desired number of perfumes and the parts (1 a may be arranged in any suitable and desired manner. Further, the exterior form of the cake of soap as a whole may be of any suitable and convenient form and if desired differently coloured pieces of soap may be assembled to form one cake having only one perfume or a plurality of perfumes, that is to say, one perfume for each individual and differently coloured piece of soap which is incorporated in the mass. Conversely similarly coloured pieces of soap may be used with different kinds of perfumes or similarly coloured pieces of soap may be used with one perfume. Having now particularly described and ascertained the nature of my said invention and in what manner the same is to be performed, I declare that what I claim is 1.. A process of manufacturing cakes of soap from differently colored soap powders which comprises the steps of filling a mold with differently colored soap powders and arranging the powders horizontally side by side to correspond to the desired color design; and then compressing said powders together to produce a homogeneous body in cake form in which the differently colored portions are integral with each other.

2. A process of manufacturing cakes of soap from differently colored soap powders, which comprises the steps of arranging a plurality of partitions to provide spaces conforming to the required design; filling each space with a colored soap powder; re moving said partitions; and then compressing said powders together to produce a homogeneous body in cake form in which the differently colored portions are integral with each other. 7

3. A process of manufacturing cakes of soap from differently colored soap powders which comprises the steps of filling a parti tioned mold, having the required design therein, with colored soap powders; removing the mold; and then compressing said powders together to produce a homogeneous body in cake form in which the differently colored portions are integral with each other and extend through the entire cake.

4. A process of manufacturing cakes of soap from colored soap powders, which comprises the steps of arranging a plurality of partitions to conform to the required de sign; filling the spaces on both sides of the' partitions with differently colored soa powders; removing said partitions; an then compressing said powders to produce a homogeneous body in cake form in which the difi'erently colored portions are integral with each other.

In testimonywhereof lf affix my signature.

OTTG SCHERIEBLE.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2945265 *Feb 25, 1957Jul 19, 1960Revere Corp AmericaMethod for making insulated wire
US4296064 *Jul 3, 1980Oct 20, 1981Satcher Angel TMethod and structure for recycling soap chips
US4460490 *Dec 17, 1981Jul 17, 1984Jeyes Group LimitedLavatory cleansing blocks
Classifications
U.S. Classification264/245, 210/532.2, 510/440, D28/8.1, 264/DIG.340, 510/146, 264/241
International ClassificationC11D13/08
Cooperative ClassificationC11D13/08, Y10S264/34
European ClassificationC11D13/08