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Publication numberUS1602197 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 5, 1926
Filing dateOct 2, 1924
Priority dateOct 2, 1924
Publication numberUS 1602197 A, US 1602197A, US-A-1602197, US1602197 A, US1602197A
InventorsKramer Le Roy
Original AssigneeContinental Cushion Spring Com
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Spring retainer for spring-cushion constructions and method of producing the same
US 1602197 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

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- LE ROY KRAMER SPRINGRETAINER FOR SPRING CUSHION CONSTRUC TIONS AND METHOD 7 OF PRODUCING THE SAME 5 Filed 001;. 2, 1924 tax Patented Get. 5, 1926.

parts" stares LE ROY KRAMER, OF CHICAGO, ILLINOIS, .ASSIGNOR T6 CONHIINJENTAL CUSHION SPRING COMP ANY, OF CHICAGO, ILLINOIS,

SPRING RETAINER FOR sienrnesousnmnfoonsrrnncrroivs AND PRODUCING LEI-IE SAME.

i a r-ear rates.

'A CORIQEATION OF ILLINOIS,

MELHHQD or :App1ication filed-October 2, 1924. Serial No. 741,213

This invention relates to spring retainers for spring cushion constructions and method of producing the same, and among its principal objects are economy in production,

simplicity in construction, and the saving of labor and time in their production. An important factor in the production of spring retainers ofthe character described herein is costof production, another is time. The reduction ofrone or both is of great importance, where competition is keen and profits low. In the construction of most all, if not all,"spring retainers for spring cushions, the work of sewing together the parts which comprise the spring retainers,is done by comparatively cheap labor, but in order to produce in large quantities, a great many operators are required. It is my aim to providea spring retainer and a method for producing the same which will enable me to dispense with large numbers of-operators, and at the same time'increase the output-and reduce the cost of production.

With these and other objects and advantages in view,'this invention consists'in the several novel features hereinafter fully set forth and claimed. Q i

The invention is clearly illustrated in the accompanying drawing, in which Fig. 1 is a perspective view of, a spring cushion construction, partly assembled and partly broken away, one of the spring retainers, embodying the present invention, being shown in position ready for insertion into the structure; Fig. 2 is a perspective view of a fragment of one of the spring retainers, and showing one step in the method of constructing them, and Fig. 3 is a plan of a strip of material from which a spring container or cell structure is constructed;

Referring to said drawing, which illustrates one embodiment of the present. invention, the reference character 5 designates a multiple compartment, spring container. of suitable dimensions to form the complete spring cushion construction. .In accordance with the usual practice it may be formed of a top 6, bottom 7 spaced parallel partitions 8 and-end walls 9, all formed of,suit-' able textile fabric-sewn, stapled, stitched or secured together in any desirable manner.

tom of an adjacent cell structure. portions. a of the top, and bottom of each able. lengths.

The spaces between the partitions form elongated compartments "for receiving the spring retainers and the coiled springs, as usual.

The spring retainers 10 comprise top and 7 bottom members 11,12 with spaced, parallel, transverse partitions l3 and end Walls let extending therebetwe'en and connected thereto. The top, bottom, and transverse walls form cells or compartments, each of .which is adapted to receive a coiled compression spring (not shown) orother elastic e ement, and one spring retainer with "the springs contained in the cells thereof 1s placed in a compartment of the multiple compartment spring container 5.

The spring retainer forming the "sub ect matter of'this "specification, is constructed of short strips of fabric A, (see Fig. 3), each of sufficient length to form the top a, bottom a and partition (4 of one cell structure, with enough additional material to overlap and be secured to the top and bot- The edge cell structure overlap the partition wall 01 of an adjacent cell structure and are secured to the top and bottom walls of said adjacent cell structure by stitching, sewing ,or stapling them thereto and for convenience I upon it.

The short strips A, may be cut from a continuous length of fabric, assembled with other strips ,and secured thereto by auto matic machinery, to form spring retainers containing any number of cells and any size. The structure may be made in a continuous length, if desired, and may be cut into suit- In constructing .a spring retainer in ac! cordance with the present method, the short have: shown the cell structure secured to gether by staples 15 that are driven through the material, as shown and clinched down If desired, a separate end wall as shown at a may be provided at one cell structure strips A, are first cut from-a i continuous length a channel strip of fabric, each strip. is then folded or formed up into shape cell structure,

roughly speaking each i channel shape piece is then partly nested over an adjacent one and the edge portions of one channel shape cell structure is then stitched, stapled, sewed or otherwise fastened to said adjacentone at or near the partition wall a 7 The spring retainers may be made in a continuous length and thereafter cut into any desired length, or may be built up originally into desired lengths by suitable automatic machinery, no claim being made herein, to any such machinery.

It is to be understood that the textile strips, when arranged in succession, with their ent s secured along two spaced parallel lines, to an adjacent strip, assume the channel like form mentioned, when the entire structure is stretched out into full length. The parts a, and a thereupon form the top and bottom in mbers of the spring retainer and the parts a form the transverse partitions.

ldore or less variation of the exact details of construction is possible without departing from the spirit or this invention; 1 desire, therefore, not to limit myself to the exact form of the construction shown and described, but intend, in the following. claims, to point out all of the invention disclosed herein. 7

I claim as new, and desire to secure by Letters Patent:

1. A spring retains for spring cushion constructions, comprising a plurality of channel shape, textile cell structures, each formed of a continuous strip of material, and all successively arranged, with the end edge portions oi each cell structure secured to an adjacent cell structure at two spaced places thereon.

2. A spring retainer for spring cushion constructions, comprising a plurality of channel shape, textile cell structures, each "formed of a continuous strip of material, and all successively arranged with their end edge portions overlapping and secured to ing 7 spring retainers for structio-ns,

an adjacent cell structure at two spaced places thereon.

3. A spring retainer for spring cushion constructions, comprising a plurality of channel shape, textile cell structures, each formed of a continuous strip of material, .and all successively arranged with the end edge portions of each cell structure stapled to an adjacent cell structure along two spaced lines intermediate the ends of said adjacent cell structure.

i. A spring retainer for spring cushion constructions, comprising, successively arranged strips of textile material, the end edge portions of each strip being secured, along two spaced lines, to an .adjacent'strip, and forming therewith a cell structure.

5. A spring retainer for spring cushion constructions, comprising successively arranged strips of textile material, the end edge portions of each being stapled, along two spaced, parallel lines, to an adjacent strip, and forming therewith a cell structure, adapted to receive a spring.

6. A spring retainer for spring cushion constructions, comprising a plurality of three sided, textile cell structures, successively arranged and secured together, the three sides of each cell structure and one siderot an adjacent one forming a tour sided cell.

7. The hereindescribed method of producstructions, which consists in successively securing the end edge portions of textile strips of material. to other textile strips. 01": ma

terial, along two spaced lines, intermediate the ends of said other strips.

8. The hereindescribedmethod of producv g retainers for springcushi-on conwhich consists in successively stapling the end edge portions of textile strips of material to other textile strips of material, along two spaced lines, intermediate the ends of said other strips.

, me nor KRAMER.

in-g sprin spring cushion con-

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US6098968 *Jun 14, 1999Aug 8, 2000L&P Property Management CompanyPocketed spring assembly
US6523812 *Jun 28, 1999Feb 25, 2003A Harrison (Bedding) LimitedSpring units
Classifications
U.S. Classification5/655.8
International ClassificationA47C27/04
Cooperative ClassificationA47C27/064, A47C27/04
European ClassificationA47C27/04, A47C27/06D1