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Publication numberUS1605588 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 2, 1926
Filing dateJan 8, 1923
Priority dateJan 8, 1923
Publication numberUS 1605588 A, US 1605588A, US-A-1605588, US1605588 A, US1605588A
InventorsJames Huiskamp
Original AssigneeJames Huiskamp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Shoe
US 1605588 A
Images(2)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nov. Z 1926.

J. HUISKAMF SHOE Filed Jan. 8, 1923 2 Sheets-Sheet l Nov. 2 1926. 1,605,588

J. HulsKAMP SHOE Filed Jan. B, 1923 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 i Patented .Nov. 1926:.

UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE.

JAMES HUISKAMP, F KEOKUK, IOWA.

SHOE.

Application filed January 1923. Serial No. 611,251.

My invention relates to shoes and more particularly to the sole constructions thereof.

One of the objects of my improvement is the provision of a simple and eiicient cushioning member for shoe soles.

A further object is the provision of .a pneumatic cushion arranged to circulate air from the interior of the shoe to the interior of the sole.

A further object is the provision of a shoe sole with one or more openings in the shank with air passages leading through the shank, ball and toe portions of the shoe so as to afford circulation of the air from between-the inner and outer soles and the interiorof the shoe.

A further object is the provision of a shoe having a stiffener in its shankwith an air passage through the sti'ener leading down into the ball of the shoe sole between the inner and outer soles thereof.

` A further object is'the provision of a shoe having a shankl stifener with a groove extending longitudinally thereof with slots extending laterally from the groove and with the groove in pneumatic communication with the interior of the shoe.

A still further object is the provision of a simple and eifcient cushioning means for shoe soles adapted to form a pneumatic cushion and at the same time force a circulation of air between the shoe and the space between the inner and outer soles.

i Other objects will appear hereinafter.

An embodiment of my invention is illustrated in the accompanying drawings, forming a 4part lof this specification, and in which- Fig. 1 is a centrall longitudinal section of a shoe embodying my invention;

Fig. 2 is a section taken as on line 2-2 in Figi;

Figs. 3 and 4 are sections taken on lines 3--3 and 4- -4, respectively, of Figli; p

Fig. 54 is a View similar to Fig. 1 showing a different arrangement of the cushioning means inthe shoe sole; l

Fig. 6 is a View taken on line 6-6 of Fig. a

Figs. 7 and 8 are vertical sections taken through the cushioning .member of the sole showing different forms'of cushions; and

Fig. 9 is a bottom view of a shank used in the construction.

Referring more particularly to the drawings, I have indicated an outer or lowersole 10 which may be of 'the usual or any preferred construction. Attached to the sole 10 is a heel 11 also of ordinary or any approved construction. Above the outer sole 10 is an inner sole 12 and attached to the soles is an upper 13. The upper and inner sole may each be of any approved construction.

The soles and upper may be joined in any desirable manner, but l prefer toprovide a conventional welt 14 around the edges of the soles, as clearly indicated. rlhe inner sole 12 is preferably split around its periphery as at 15 and one part of the split portion 16 is doubled under the` sole 12 proper and stitched as at 17 to the upper 13 and welt 14, as clearly indicated in Figs. 3 and 4. The welt 14 is then stitched as at 18 to the sole 10.

This welt construction provides a space 19 between the soles and the welts at opposite edges of the soles in which s disposed my improved pneumatic cushion. rlFhe cushioning means is provided under the ball and toe portions of the shoe, as indicated in Fig. 2, or may be extended back to the heel, as indicated in Fig. 6 or entirely over the heel, if desired. From this it will be apparent that the length of the cushioning means may be changed to suit any different requirement.

My improved pneumatic cushion is preferably a rubber plate 20 of flexible construction with extensions or projections 21 extendingA from one side thereof. I preferably extend the projections 21 downwardly, but they may extend upwardly if desired. Each one of the projections 21 is provided with a perforation 22 which also extends through the plate 2O so that the ends of the perforations 22 are against the inner and outer soles, as indicated in Fig. 3. The inner and outer soles are more or less flexible and substantially smooth so that they it tightly against the plate 20 and remote ends of the projections 21 so as to seal the tops and bottoms of openings 22. With this construction, when weight is placed on the inner sole 12 air is compressed in perforations 22, thereby rendering a pneumatic .cushioning effect to the sole. This makes the sole .very soft in use and providesmeans for bringing the cushion and sole back to normal condition when the weight is reduced on the sole 12, due to the resiliency of the air together with the resiliency of the rubber.

The cushion member 20-21 preferably extends through the toe and ball portions of the shoe, as indicated in, Figs. 1 and 2, and is provided with an angular or skived portion 23 at the juncture between the ball and shank of the shoe. This angular portion is' preferably thickened and provided with grooves 24 through which air can pass from and around the projections 21 into the space between the soles 10 and 12 at the shank of the shoe. Therefore the air is free to circulate between the toe, ball and shank po-rtions of the shoe at all times.

Where the air cushion extends only through the toe and ball portions of the shoe, as indicated in Figs. 1 and 2, I preferably arrange a shank stilfener 25 from the ball portion to the heel portion of the shoe substantially in the conventional manner, but I provide an air passage 26 in said stiifener. rIhis air passage may be formed in any desired manner, such as by forming the stidn ener 2.5 of sheet material and striking' up a bead so as to make the passage or groove 26 in one side thereof. rIhe groove 26 is preferably in communication with the space between the projections 21 at the ball of the shoe, as clearly indicated in Fig. 2, and this may be done by cutting out a portion of the bead, as clearly indicated in said figure. I also preferably provide communications between the passage 26 and the spaces at the sides of said shank stilfener. These may be slots 27 (Fig. 2) or openings 28, (Fig. 9). With this construction air can pass freely and uninterruptedly between the spaces or chambers enclosed between the inner and outer soles. I arrange one or more openings 29 in the inner sole 12 preferably in the shank, as indicated in Fig. 1. I have indicated three of said openings 29 each provided with an eyelet 30 and it will be understood that as many of these openings may be provided as desired and finished in any desired manner.

It should be understood that the protuberv ances 21 are preferably provided with air pockets so as to increase the resiliency of the cushion sole in restoring itself to normal condition when the foot pressure is relieved. When foot pressure is exerted the air confined in the protuberances adds to the resiliency of the rubber in producing a cushioning effect. It will be seen that the protuberances are separate and independent by being spaced apart and spread over a wide area, ofv the bottom of the sheet 20 within the boundary of the Welt 4 thus occupying the space which is ordinarily filled with what is termed a filler in a welt shoe. foot pressure is exerted on the inner sole 12 to compress .the rubber sheet against the action of the protuberances and the air pockets therein, the air within the chamber surrounding the protuberances will be forced outof the4 opening or openings 29 into the inside of the shoe. -When the foot pressure When i is relieved the resiliency of the protubcrances, particularly when provided with the sealed air pockets, will immediately cause the inner sole 12 to spring back to its original position thereby drawing air through the opening or openings 29 into the chamber surrounding the protuberances. The bottom sole 10 being imperforate or sealed will confine the air circulation wholly within the shoe and therefore only warm air will be circulated and chilling of the feet prevented.

In Fig. 7 I have shown a modification of the cushion filler by providing a rubber sheet 31 cemented to the bottom of the protuberances so as to permanently seal the bottoms of the air pockets in these protuberances. The close lit between the bottom of the inner Sole 12 and the upper surface of the sheet 2O may then be relied on to close the upper ends of the perfor-ations in the sheet 20.

In Fig. 8 I have shown a further modification by cementing sheets of rubber 31 and 32 to both sides of the perforated sheet 20. Both in the form shown in Fig. 7 and in the form shown in Fig. 8 the rubber combined with the sealed air pockets serve as a cushion sole and the chamber surrounding the protuberances communicates with the opeuing or openings 29 to effect the Ventilating circulation of warm air, as above described.

In Figs. 5 and 6 I have shown a modification of the combined cushion sole liller and ventilator by omitting the metal shank piece 25 of Figs. 1 and 2 and extending the sheet 20 back toward the heel as far as the welt extends. An opening 29 in the sole 12 communicates with the interior of the shoe but theindividual air pockets in the protuberances 21 are sealed between the sole 10 and the inner sole 12. Since no shank piece is used in the form shown in Figs. 5 and 6 the grooves 24 may be omitted from the cross-piece 23 or the cross-piece may be omitted. If desired the cushioning inner sole 12 may be extended to the rear end of the shoe so as to be under the entire foot of the wearer, including the heel.

In manufacturing a cushion sole shoe embodying the protuberances having the air pockets therein I prefer to out out the cushion soles of desired shape and size from large sheets previously produced including the skived edge 23 with the slots 24 therein for the form shown in Figs. 1 and 2, or with the skived edge without the .slots for the form shown in Figs. 5 and 6.

Obviously those skilled in the art may make various changes in the details and arrangements of parts without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention as dened by the claims hereto appended and I wish therefore not to be restricted to the precise construction herein disclosed.

Having thus fully disclosed an' embodiment of my invention, what I desire to secure by Letters Patent of the United States 1s:

l. shoe comprising an imperforate outer sole, an insole having an opening at its shank portion, a stiffener having an air passage extending longitudinally thereof in communication with said opening in said insole, and a pneumatic cushion having upper and lower imperforate walls spaced apart from each other at the ball. of the shoe between said outer sole and said insole in pneumatic communication with said air passage, said cushion comprising a plurality of protuberances with permanently sealed. air pockets therein disposed between said upper and lower imperforate walls.

2. A shoe comprising an outer sole, an insole, a shank stiffener between said soles and having anair groove extending therethrough in communication with the interior of the shoe, and a pneumatic cushion having imperforate walls at the hall of the shoe between said soles and comprising a plurality of spaced-apart protuberances with air pockets permanently sealed therein, the space surrounding said protuberances affording a pneumatic chamber in communication through said grooved shank stifi'ener with the interior of said shoe.

'3. A shoe comprising an outer sole, an insole with an opening through the latter at the shank portion of the shoe', a shank stiffener between said soleswith a groove therein, and a rubber cushion inner sole between said outer sole and said insole and comprising a plurality of spaced protuberances with air pockets therein permanently lsealed with rubber, the space within said sole surrounding said protuberances affording a. chamber in communication with the interior of said shoe through said shank stiffener and the opening in said insole.

4r. A shoev comprising an imperforate outer sole, a perforated insole, a welt joining the edges of the soles and spacing the latter apart, a pneumatic cushion between said soles within the boundary of said welt. and comprising a multiplicity of widely distributed permanently sealed air pockets in protub'erances between imperforate walls, and a shank stiffener with a groove in its upper side to afford communication between the chamber surrounding the protuberances and the interior of said shoe through the perforated insole.

5. A' shoe comprising an outer sole, an insole with an opening therein, a shank stiffener between said soles with a groove extending longitudinally thereof in communication'with said opening in said insole and also in communication between said soles at the ball portion of the shoe, and a cushion inner sole comprising a multiplicity of spaced-apart protuberances with air pockets permanently sealed therein between resilientwalls and affordinga chamber surrounding the protuberances in communication through the groove of said shank stiffenerand said opening to the interior of the shoe.

6. A shoe comprising an outer sole, an insole ha'ving a plurality of openings at the shank portion of the shoe, ashank stifi'ener having a longitudinal groove in communication with said openings, and means comprising a plurality of protuberances bounded by resilient walls between said soles with air pockets permanently sealed in said protuberances with the space surrounding said pro-y tuberances affording a compressible chamber adjacent the ball portion of the shoe and in communication through said groove and said openings with the interior of the shoe.

7. A shoe comprising an outer sole, an insole with an opening therethrough, a stiffener between the soles at the shank portion thereof, said stiil'ener having a groove therein extending substantially from the heel to the ball portion of the shoe and in communication through saidv opening with the interior of the shoe, a cushion inner sole comprising spaced rubber layers with a plurality of rubber protuberanoes between them with air pockets permanently sealed in said rubber protuberances and the space surrounding said protuberances affording a chamber in communication with the interior of' the shoe through said groove and said opening in the insole.

8. A shoe comprising an outer sole, an insole with an opening'therein, an elongated sheet metal stiffener having a groove extending longitudinally thereof with a transverse slot, and a cushion inner sole comprising sheets of resilient material spaced apart with a plurality of vspaced-apart protuberances with air pockets permanently sealed therein, the space surrounding said protuberances between said sheets affording a chamber in lUs'n llo communication with the interior of the shoe through said groove, slot and opening.

9. A shoe comprising an outer sole, an insole with an opening at the shank portion, a sheet metal stiffener between said soles at the shank portion of the shoe with a bead providing a groove in communication with said opening, said stiffener being also provided with a transverse slot to afford communication with said groove, and a cushion inner sole comprising spaced-apart imperforate sheets connected by spaced protuberances to afford a pneumatic chamber in communication with the interior of the shoe through said slot, groove and opening.

10. A shoe comprising outer and inner soles with an opening through the inner sole at the shank thereof, a sheet of flexible material between said soles at the ball portion of the shoe, downwardly extending proway extending from thechamber surrounding said projections to the opening in said inner sole, and a stilifener disposed in the shank of the shoe with an air passage there in leading from the opening in the inner sole along the passage in. said thickened edge portion of the shoe adjacent the shank of the shoe to the spaces between the projections on said flexible sheet.

` 11. A cushion sole shoe comprising a bottom sole permanently closed7 a perforated insole, and a rubber cushion inner sole comprising lspaced sheets of resilient material with a multiplicity of distributed protuberances with air pockets permanently sealed between them individually with a pneumatic chamber surrounding said protuberances between saidn sheets.

12. A shoe comprising an outer sole imperforate to close the entire bottom face ot the shoe, an insole spaced from said outer sole and perforated, and resilient means interposed between said insole and said outer sole adjacent the ball of the shoe and comprising spaced sheets of resilient material with spaced-apart protuberances with air pockets permanently sealed therein between said sheets, the space surrounding said protuberances affording a pneumatic chamber in communication With the interior of the shoe through said perforated insole to permit compression of the chamber between said soles under t-he weight of the wearer of the shoe thus circulating air between the chamber formed by said shoe and said protuberances with the confined air therein automatically restoring the pneumatic chamber between said soles when such compression is released.

13. A cushion sole shoe comprising a welt and spaced-apart soles to form an inter- `mediate chamber within the boundary of said welt, and a rubber ller in said chamber comprising1 spaced rubber sheets with a multiplicity of permanently sealed air pockets distributed over the space between said sheets within the boundary of said Welt- In testimony whereof I have signed my name to this specication on this 3rd day of January, A. D. 1923.

. JAMES HUSKAMP

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4685224 *Jul 12, 1985Aug 11, 1987Wolfgang AngerInsole
US5233767 *Sep 27, 1991Aug 10, 1993Hy KramerArticle of footwear having improved midsole
US5369896 *Mar 1, 1993Dec 6, 1994Fila Sport S.P.A.Sports shoe incorporating an elastic insert in the heel
US5384977 *Jun 25, 1993Jan 31, 1995Global Sports Technologies Inc.Sports footwear
US5493791 *May 10, 1993Feb 27, 1996Hy KramerArticle of footwear having improved midsole
US5918383 *Oct 16, 1995Jul 6, 1999Fila U.S.A., Inc.Sports shoe having an elastic insert
US6041521 *May 19, 1998Mar 28, 2000Fila Sport, Spa.Sports shoe having an elastic insert
US6754982Nov 30, 2001Jun 29, 2004Wolverine World Wide, Inc.Shoe cushioning system and related method of manufacture
US6883253Jun 26, 2003Apr 26, 2005Fila Sport S.P.A.2A improvements
US7225491May 18, 2004Jun 5, 2007Wolverine World Wide, Inc.Shoe cushioning system and related method of manufacture
DE3737302A1 *Nov 4, 1987May 18, 1989Heinrich KehlbeckEinlegesohle mit einem gehalt an germanium
WO1991011928A1 *Feb 4, 1991Aug 22, 1991Hy KramerArticle of footwear having improved midsole
WO2011042112A1Sep 14, 2010Apr 14, 2011Immobiliare Bibo S.R.L.Shoe sole that allows breathability of the foot
Classifications
U.S. Classification36/3.00R, D02/961
International ClassificationA43B7/00, A43B7/06
Cooperative ClassificationA43B7/06
European ClassificationA43B7/06