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Publication numberUS1607623 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 23, 1926
Filing dateNov 3, 1923
Priority dateNov 3, 1923
Publication numberUS 1607623 A, US 1607623A, US-A-1607623, US1607623 A, US1607623A
InventorsEdward F Higgins
Original AssigneeJos H Meyer Bros Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Process of manufacturing imitation mother-of-pearl
US 1607623 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nov 23 1926. 1,607,623

E. F. HIGGINS PROCESS OF MANUFACTURING IMITAIION MOTHER- OF-PEARL Filed Nov. 5, 1923 Patented Nov. 23, 1926.

' UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE.

EDWARD F. HIGGINS, OF BROOKLYN, NEW YORK. ASSIGNOR TO J'OS. H. MEYER -BROS- INC., 01 BROOKLYN, NEW YORK, A. CORPORATION OF NEW YORK.

PROCESS OF MANUFACTURING IMITATION MO'iHER-OF-PEARL.

Application filed November 8, 1923. Serial No. 672,470.

This invention relates to the manufacture of imitation of mother-ofearl.

The object of the invention is to providea method of producing a substance in imitation of mother-of-pearl in which the characteristic diffused sheen effects .of genuine mother-of-pearl are obtained, for usein the manufacture of various articles of commerce.

Other objects of the invention will appear more fully hereinafter.

The invention consists substantially in the mode of operation, all as will be hereinafter more fully set forth and finally pointed out in the appended claims.

In my Patent No. 1,539,084, granted May 26, 1925, on application, Serial No.'570,730,

- filed June 24:, 1922, I have shown, described and claimed a method of manufacturing imitation mother-of-pearl where fish scale pigment is incorporated into a sii'itable plastic composition and the solvent, or the excess thereof. contained in the composition is then removed and the mass formed into a cake or block which block is sliced into sheets and the sheets blanked out. molded, die-pressed or otherwise fabricated into various commercial products.

The present invention relates generally to the same mode of operation as set forth and described in my said patent, and more articularly the present invention dea'ls Wit 1 the treatment of the mass after the incorporation herein of the pigment and the removal of the excess solvent therefrom.

I do not claim herein the product result.- ing from the mode-of operation hereinafter pointed out and claimed, as such product forms the subject matter of my application, Ser. No. 697,715. filed Mar. 8, 1924.

Referring to the accompanying drawing, Figure l is an end view, the plunger piston being in section, of an extruding apparatus in one form thereof employed in carrying out my present inventio Fig. 2 is a longitudinal central sectional view on the line 2-2, Fig. 1, looking in the direction of the arrows.

Fig. 3 is a view in section on the line 3-3 of Fig. 2, looking in the'direction'of the arrows.

Fig. 4 is a view in inclined section on the line 44, Fig. 2, looking in the direction of the arrows.

Fig. 5 is a view slightly in perspective of the material in the form in which .it is delivered from the extruding apparatus.

Fig. 6 is a View of a sheet of the extruded material.

Various attempts have been madeheretofore to produce a diffused sheen effect in pyroxylin and other plastic compounds in imitation of mother-of-pearl, and various pigments have been proposed for this pur pose. These efforts have been directed along two principal lines of operation. According to one line of operation the pigment employed is incorporated in the plastic mass by kneading or otherwise, either in a mixing machine or during the subsequent calenderng operation to which the plastic material is sub ected, then the mass is subjected to heat and pressure to form the same into a solid block which, after cooling, is sheeted into sheets of the desired thickness. This method has not been found to give the desired results in that it yields a product hav-' ing an inferior luster due to the fact that the particles of pigment are indiscriminately positioned within the mass of the plastic material without due regard to the luster effects to be produced.

According to another proposed method the plastic mass is kneaded in a mixing machine 'or by roller compression or otherwise Without the incorporation of a pigment within the mass. The mass is formed into 'a block or cake by compression and heat and then is cut intov thin sheets, one or both of the'surfaces of the individual sheets is rubbed over with a pigment suspended in a liquid, or else' the pigment is applied to the surface (one or both) of the sheet by flowing the same thereover in the form of a thin film. The sheets so treated are then stacked up into a pile which is subjected to heat and pressure to form the same into a block or cake. This block or cake is again sheeted, and the sheets employed in the manufacture of various articles of commerce. I

While this operation yields a .product which is superior in luster to that of the first line of operation referred to, nevertheless such product is hard, brittle and flaky and cracks or breaks with slight bending, the breaks occurring along the lines of junction of the individual sheets owing to the fact that the particles of pigment orfthe film applied to the surface or surfaces of the sheets have not been thoroughly incorporated in the entire mass, but act as insulating layers between adjacent sheets which prevent homogeneous unitin of the surfaces of such adjacent sheets; son of its brittleness or friability, is difficult to work up into manufactured products.

I propose, in accordance with my present invention, to provide a mode of operation which avoids the objections noted to both lines of proposed effort referred to, and in accordance with my present invention I propose to incorporate the pigment thoroughly into the plastic mass, while the latter is maintained in a soft condition by the action of an excess of solvent therein, and then after removal of the excess solvent of the plastic mass, to subject the mass to a cooking action under heat and pressure, and then to force the cooked mass, which has been reduced by the heat and pressure to the desired plasticity or fluidity through a hot die which exerts an ironing. polishing or calendering action upon the surfaces of the mass extruded through the die and while reduced by the heat to a softened condition, which action causes the pigment particles to be disposed in the proper and the uniform trend of direction to give the best or highest lustrous effects. The polished sheets thus produced are then stacked into a pile, without any intervening layer of insulating pigment or film, and the stack or pile is again subjected to heat and pressure to form the pile into a solid block or cake which is homogeneous throughout. This cake then is sheeted into sheets for use in the manufacture of various commercial products. The

luster effects, in close resemblance to genuine mother-of-pearl, are produced and a product is yielded which is capable of being readily and easily worked up into various commercial articles.

In carrying out my invention, and in securing a superior luster effect, I first produce the celluloid composition in the usual and ordinary way. This mass is then thoroughly kneaded into a dough with an excess of solvent, all dirt and extraneous matter being filtered off, resulting in the production of a plastic mass. Into this plastic mass is then thoroughly incorporated a fish scale pigment sus ensi'on in a solvent which is miscible wit the plastic mass, such as alcohol, acetone, or the like. After adding the pigment in this manner to the mass, said mass is thoroughly kneaded in a mixing machine, or otherwise, to thoroughly incorporate the pigment in and uniformly distribute the same through the mass. The excess of solvent-contained in the mass is then removed in any suitable manner. This may be con- Veniently accomplished by kneading the mass on warm rolls or by working the same back and forth in a kneading apparatus of T is product, by rea subjected to heat and pressure until the mass is sufiiciently cooked and reduced to a more plastic or fluidcondition. The mass is then extruded under increased pressure from the receptacle in which it is subjected to heat and pressure, and through a hot die which delivers the materialin the form of a thin body or sheet, accordin to the construction of the die, the surface 0? which body or sheet becoming ironed, polished or calendered during th extrusion operation, causing the facets or surfaces of the pigment particles which have previously been incorporated into the mass, to be dis osed in uniform direction in the extrude product. These sheets, or sheets formed from the thin body obtained as a result of the extruding operation, are then stacked into a pile and the pile isagain subjected to heat and pressure in order to cause the piled sheets to unite in the contacting surfaces thereof into a homogeneous mass, cake or block. This block is then sheeted into sheets of the desired thickness for use in the manufacture of various articles of commerce.

By the extruding operation and the resultant disposition of the faces or facets of the pigment in the proper trend of uniform direction I am enabled, in my final product, to secure a very superior and beautiful lustrous effect which is impossible of attainment according to the methods and operations heretofore proposed. Moreover, by thoroughly incorporating the pigment material within and distributing the same throughout the mass, I am enabled to increase the amount of pigment to any desired degree of density to attain any desired lustrous effect. \Vhere the pigment is not incorporated Within the plastic macs but is merely flowed on to the surface of sheets obtained from the plastic mass, any increase in the amount of pigment results in increasing the brittleness and friability of the resulting material, when sheeted, because of the resulting increase in insulation between the sheets of plastic material which the increased quantity of pigment produces, thereby preventing the amalgamation of the surfaces of the sheets when pressed into a block.

From the foregoing description it will be observed that the important and vital step of my process resides in the extruding operation, as I thereby eliminate various operations heretofore believed to be required, and I am enabled to produce a product which is far superior in lustrous effect than has been possible to produce heretofore in the finished product.

In the drawing I have shown one form of extruding apparatuswhich is suitable for use in carrying out my invention. My presthe ent invention, however, is not'limited or confined to the particular form-of extrudin apparatus shown and now to be' describe but in the mode of operation, and; it is understood that the process maybe equal] apparatus and dies. In the form shown I employ a container shown in this instance as a cylinder 6 one end 'of which is open, the other end havin applied thereto a head or ca 7. Disposed Within the cylinder 6 is a lining 8 within which fits and works a iston 9 carried by a piston rod 10 adapted to be operated by hydraulic or other pressure. In order to secure the desired heat to the action of which plastic mass placed within the cylinder is to be subjected, the cylinder may be heat- A'slmple arrangement is shown for accoma plishingthis purpose wherein a spiral groove 11 is cut in the exterior surface .of the lining 8 and through the continuous channel thus provided, is circulated a suitable heating medium. For instance,'I found hot water 11, through supp y pipe connection 12 communicating with one end of the channel 11,

.and discharged through the discharge pipe 00nnection'13 communicating with the opposits. endof the channel 11.

The spral channel- 11 encircling the lining 8 man times from end to end'of said linging, a I

fords a most efiicient heating arrangement. The end of the cylinder to which the cap 'plate 7 is applied is provided with an opening 14 ofsmaller diameter than that of the c inder'i Disposed over the outer end of t is opening 14 is a plate 15 having a series of openings 16 therethrough. These openings are shown, in the form of apparatus selected to illustrate one form of means for carrying out the process of' my invention, as being elongated and of comparatively narrow area. In practice I have found it satisfactory to employ openings, the longer axes thereof being disposed in radial relation with respect to the disk or .plate 15 and of so a ' forated plate 15.

i the opening 14 in the cylinder end. Formed f with, or suitably secured to the plate or disk- 15 is a'die plug 17 which, in the particular form shown, is of cylindrical shape having a tapered neck 18 adjacent the per- The plate or disk 15 is clamped into arecess 19,'countersunk. into the end of the cylinder, by the plate or head 7. and said plate may be adjusted into the desired relation with respect to the opening 14 in the cylinder end and an opening 20 through the cap or ,plate7. An adjusting set screw 21 is shown for securing this adjustment. Threaded into the outer face of the cap or plate 7 is a cylinder member 22 having a lining 23 formed with a spiral any as well as'the die plug 17. The heating mevvell carried out in ,a variety of forms of 1s tapered so as to ad in any suitable or convenient mannernular groove 24, similar to the spiral groove 11 in the sleeve 8, as above described, for

the purpose of circulati a heatingmedium for heating the inner sur ace of the sleeve 23,

diummay-be introduced to the channel 24 and delivered therefrom through one or another of the pi es or connections 25, 26. The opening 20 t rough the cap or plate 7 a proach at itsouter edge the cylindrical surfiice of the die plug 17. This die lug extends through the lining 23 of cylin er 22, leaving a very narrow annular space 27 between the interior surface of sleeve 23 and the exterior surface of plug 17. The taper 18 of die plug 17 and the ad- ]acent tapering wall of the opening 20 in the cap or plate 7 results in constricting the passage from the cylinder 8 through and into the die space 27. v

In accordance with my invention the plastic. mass having a pigment, preferably a fish scale pigment, thoroughly incorporated within and distributed throughout the mass thereof, and after the removal from said mass. of the excess of solvent, contained therein, is introduced into the cylinder 8. The (piston 9 is then inserted through the open en of the cylinder and pressure applied therethrough to the mass of plastic material contained in the cylinder. At the same time a heating medium is caused to In practice flowthrough the channel 11.

have found it desirable to maintain the mass within the heated cylinder for a period of several hours, say from two to three hours, at a temperature of about 150 F. to 180 F., and under a pressure offrom 1000 lbs. to 1800 lbs. suits in thorough y in 'this period the die is maintained in a co d condition, and by keeping the die cold and by reason of the narrow openings 16 in Uli er square inch. This recooking the-massin the 1 cylinder and rendering it very plastic. Durthe die plate 15 and the constriction formed by the neck of the die plug cooperating with the inclined wall ofthe opening 20 in the cap or plate 7, a sufficient resistance is formed to prevent the extrusion of the mass rom the cylinder While being subjected to the heat and pressure in the cooking operation. After some two or three hours of the cooking operation, the die is heated by causing a heating medium to circulate through the annular groove 24, to a temperature somewhat higher than'that of the. cylinder 8, namely, from 170 F. to'200 F and the pressure exerted by the piston is increased gradually to say. 2500 to 4000 lbs. per square inch. The result is that the resistance offered by the cold condition of the 'die plugand its associated surfaces is overencompassing sleeve 23. In practice I have found a space of approximately onetwentieth of an inch in width is suitable for my urposes. The extruded material is force from the die into the form of a continuous thin hollow cylinder. This cylinder as it is extruded, is cut off at suitable lengths and the cylinder lengths are split open and rolled out to form a flat sheet. These sheets are then stacked into a pile and the stack or pile subjected in a press to heat and pressure to form the same into a solid homogeneous block or mass. 1 have found a pressure of from 700 to 1200 lbs. per square inch, and a temperature in the press of from 180 F. to 200 F. suflicient for my purposes. The result of this heat and pressure is to cause the stacked-up sheets to become united and amalgamated into a solid homogeneous mass or block. This block is then sheeted into sheets of the desired thickness for working up into various articlesiof manufacture.

If desired, and in order'to secure aj desirable variety of lustrous effects and sheen, in building up pile, after being produced in" the die apparatus, intermediate layers or sheets may be cut up into i-rregularl shaped sections or portions which are istributed indiscriminately throughout or over'the area of the sheet below it in the stack or pile.

It will be observed that during the extruding operation the trend or direction of the facets or faces of the pigment isrendered uniform in the resulting thin sheets, as indicated at 32, and I am thus "enabled to secure an enhanced and superior luster effect in the final product. a

The extent to which the unidirectional trend of the pigment particles in the mass is imparted during the extruding voperation controls thelustrous or sheen-effects produced in the final product, and such unidirectional trend is controlled by the rate of extrusion, the degree to which the die is heated, the character of the die surfaces and the area of. the'spa'cethrough which the extrusion takes place. These factors, of course, control the degree of polishing, ironing or calendering imparted to the surfaces of the thin product which is delivered from the die, and one or another of these factors may be varied as necessity or taste may dictate.

While I have described my invention as applied to the manufacture of imitation mother-of-pearl, it is to be understood that the same process is equally well adapted for use in the manufacture of other products by substituting other pigments or pigment materialfor the fish scale pigment. Thus, by using a bronze powder pigment a product is produced that possesses a beautiful golden luster which does not tarnish, and by using a silver powder or an aluminum powder, a

the sheets into a stack-or beautiful silver luster is reduced. I am, I

material, then forming the mass into a thin body and disposing and fixing the facets or surfaces of the individual particles of the incorporated pigment therein in a unidirectional trend.-

2. In the manufacture of imitation products, the process which consists in incorporating1 a pigment, comprising particles having 'ght reflecting faces or facets into a mass of plastic material, then forming the mass into a thin body and disposing the facets or surfaces of the particles of the incorporated pigment therein in a unidirectional'jtrend, then stacking a plurality of such thin bodies the one upon another and forming the stacked bodies into a homogeneous mass. a

3. In the manufacture of imitation products, the process whichconsists in incorporating a pigment comprising particles having light reflecting-faces or facets into'a mass of plastic material, then forming the mass into a thinbody and disposing the surfaces of particles of the incor orated pigment therein in a unidirectiona trend, then stacking a plurality of such thin bodies the one upon another and forming the stacked bodies into a homogeneous mass, and then cutting the resulting mass into sheets.

4. In the manufacture of imitation mother-of-pearl, the process which consists in incorporating fish scale pigment comprising particles having light reflecting faces or facets into and distributing the same throughout a mass of plastic material, then forming the mass into a thin body and disposing and fixing the facets or surfaces of particles of pigment incorporated therein into uniform direction.

5. In the manufacture of imitation mother-of-pearl, the process which consists in incorporating fish scale pi ment into and distributing the same throughout a mass of plastic material, then forming the mass into a thin b-odyand disposing the facets or surfaces of particles of pigment incorporated therein into uniform direction, land then forming a plurality gf suclithin bodies under heat and pressure into a homogeneous mass.

6. In the manufacture of imitation mother-of-pearl, the process which consists in incorporating fish scale pigment into and distributing the same throughout a mass of ecting faces or facets into a fit? ii zii i g light re plastic material, then forming the mass into a thin body and disposing facets or surfaces ofithe particles of igment incorporated therein into uniformd irection, then forming a plurality of such thin bodies under heat and pressure into a homogeneous mass, and then cutting the homogeneous mass into sheets.

7. In the manufacture of imitation products, the process which consists in incorporating a pigment comprising particles having light reflecting faces or facets into amass of plastic material and then forcing the mass through a die to dispose the facets or surfaces of particles of the 'incor orated pigment into substantially uniform llght reflecting position.

8. In the manufacture of imitation products, the process which consists in incorporating a, pigment comprising particles having light reflecting faces or facets into a mass of plastic material and then forcing the mass through a die under heat and pressure to form the same into a thin body by forcing the same through a restricted space and to dispose the facets or surfaces of pigment particles into position to produce a. variegated light reflecting effect.

9. In the manufacture of imitation prod-- ucts, the process which consists in incora pigment comprising particles ecting faces or facets into a mass of plastic material and then forcing the same through a heated die to form the same into a thin sheet and to dispose the facets or surfaces of the pigment particles into substantially the same directional trend.

10. In the manufacture of imitation products, the prcoess which consists in incorporating a pigment comprising particles having light reflecting faces or facets in and distributing the same throughout a plastic mass, then subjecting the mass to heat and pressure to form the same into a homogeneous softened mass, then forcing the softened mass through a heated die having arestricted exit opening to form the same into a thin body, and to dispose the surfaces of the, incorporated pigment particles into a substantially uniform directional trend, then stacking a plurality of such thin bodies into a pile and subjecting the same again to heat and pressure to form the pile of thin bodies into a substantially homogeneous block or mass, and finally cuttlng the block or mass into thin sheets.

11. In the manufacture of imitation mother-of-pearl, the process which consists in incorporating a pigment comprising particles having light reflecting faces or facets into and distributing the same throughout a mass of plastic material, and subjecting the mass to heat and pressure and disposing and fixing the surfaces or facets of the pigment particles in portions thereof into uniform directional trend while maintained in heated condition.

12. In the manufacture of imitation products, the process which consists in incorporating a pigment comprising particles havlng wht reflecting faces or facets into and distri uting the same throughout a mass of plastic material, and disposing and fixmg by heat and pressure the surfaces or facets of particles of pigment in uniform trend of direction in said mass.

13. In the manufacture of imitation mother-of-pearl, the process which consists in incorporating a pigment comprising particles having light reflecting faces or facets into and distributing the same throughout a mass of plastic material, and then forming the mass under heat and pressure into a thin bod to dispose and fix the facets or surfaces of t e particles of pigment contained in such thin body in unidirectional trend.

14. In the manufacture of imitation mother-of-pearl, the process which consists in incorporating a pigment comprising particles having light reflecting faces or facets into and distributing the same throughout a mass of plastic material, then subjecting such mass to heat and pressure, and finally forming the heated mass under increased pressure and continued heat into a thin body to dispose and fix the facets or surfaces of particles of pigment into unidirectional trend.

15. In the manufacture of imitation mother-of-pearl, the process which consists in incorporating a pigment comprising particles having light reflecting faces orfacets into and distributing the same throughout amass of plastic material, then forming the mass under heat and pressure into a thin body to dispose facets or surfaces of the particles of pigment contained in such thin body into unidirectional trend, and then stacking a plurality of such thin bodies into a pile and subjecting the pile to heat and pressure to form the same into a. homogeneous block or cake, and finally sheeting the resulting cake or block into thin sheets.

16. In the manufacture of imitation mother-of-pearl, the process which consists in incorporating a pigment comprising particles having light refiecting'faces or facets into and distributing the same throughout a mass of plastic material, then subjecting such mass to heat and pressure, then forming the heated mass under increased ressure and continued heat into a thin lOQC y to dispose the facets or surfaces of particles of pigment into unidirectional trend, and then stacking a plurality of such thin bodies into a pile and subjecting the same to pressure and heat to form the same into a homogeneous block or cake, and finally sheeting the block or cake into thin sheets.

17. In the manufacture of imitation of mother-of-pearl, the process which consists in incorporating a pigment comprising particles having light reflecting faces or facets into and distributing the same throughout a mass of plastic material, then forming the mass under heat and pressure into a thin body to dispose the surfaces or facets of the particles of pigment contained in such thin body into unidirectional trend, then forming such thin body into sheets andstacking the same in successive layers to form a pile, one or more of such layers composed of small fragments of a sheet indiscriminately placed to form the layer, and then subjecting the pile to pressure and heat to form the same into a homogeneous block or cake, and finally sheeting the block or cake into comparatively thin sheets.

18. In. the manufacture of imitation mOther-of-pearI, the process which consists in incorporating a pigment comprising particles having light reflecting faces or facets into and distributing the same throughout a mass of plastic material and forcing the mass under pressure through a heated die of restricted exit area to dispose the surfaces or facets of the pigment particles in the mass into the same general direction.

19. In the manufacture of imitation mother-of-pearl, the process which consists in incorporating a pigment comprising particles having light reflecting faces or facets into and distributing the same throughout a mass of plastic material and forcing the mass under pressure through a heated die of restricted exit area to form the same into a thin body with the facets or surfaces of the pigment particles contained therein disposed in unidirectional trend, forming such body into a stack of super osed layers thereof, and subjecting the stac to heat and pressure to form the same into a homogeneous mass, and finally sheeting such mass into thin sheets.

20. In j the manufacture of imitation mother-of-pearl, the process which consists in incorporating a pigment comprising particles having light reflecting faces or facets into and distributing the same throughout amass of plastic material, then subjecting said mass to heat and pressure, then forcing the compressed and heated mass through a heated die of restricted exit area to dispose the surfaces or facets of the pigment particles in the mass into substantially the same trend of direction.

21. In the manufacture of imitation mot-her-of-p'earl, the process which consists in incorporating a pigment comprising particles having light reflecting faces or facets into and distributing the same throughout a mass of plastic material, and then forcing .such mass under pressure and in a heated condition through a restricted area to cause the light reflecting surfaces of the facets of the particles of igment material contained therein to be (isposed in unidirectional trend.

22. In the manufacture of imitation products that step which consists in disposing and fixing the surfaces or facets of particles of pigment contained in a plastic mass in substantially unidirectional trend.

23. In the manufacture of imitation products, that step which consists in extruding through the restricted exit opening of a heated die a plastic mass having incorporated therein a pigment composed of par ticles with light reflecting faces or facets.

24. In the manufacture of imitation mother-of-pearl, that step which consists in extruding by pressure a heated plastic mass having a pigment with light reflecting particles incorporated therein through an exit opening of restricted area of a heated die.

25. In the manufacture of imitation mother-of-pearl, the process which consists in incorporating into a mass of plastic ma.- terial the pigment of fish scales, and then forming the mass under an ironing pressure into a thin body to dispose and fix the pigment particles in unidirectional trend.

26. In the manufacture of imitation mother-of-pearl, the process which consists in incorporating into a mass of plastic material the pigment of fish scales, and then forming the mass under heat and an ironing pressure into a thin body to dispose and fix the pigment particles in unidirectional trend... a

27. In the manufacture of imitation products, the process which consists in incorporating-with a mass of plastic material a pigment having particles with light reflecting facets or surfaces, and then subjecting the mass to a surface rubbing or ironing action to dispose and maintain the facets or surfaces of the pigment particles in the same general direction.

28. Process of manufacture of substances having a nacreous appearance, and the like, consisting in placing in suspension in a transparent plastic substance a material composed of corpuscles forming minute reflectors, in producing a systematic orientation of said corpuscles, and in immobilizing the latter in this orientation by the solidification of the substance.

29. Process 'of manufacture of substance having a nacreous appearance, and the like, consisting in miXin the pearl essence with a solution ofa cellu ose substance in a suitable solvent,-in producing a systematic orientation of the brilliant corpuscles of the pearl essence in suspension in the mixture and in producing a coagulation of the said cellulose substance, whereby the said corpuscles are immobilized in the given orien tation.

30. Process of manufacture of substances having a nacreous appearance, and the like, consisting in placing in suspension in a transparent plastic substance a material composed of corpuscles forming minute reflectors, in producing in the said substance a suitable current or flow whereby the said reflecting corpuscles shall be oriented in a systematic manner, and in immobilizing the said corpuscles in this orientation by the solidification of the substance.

31. Process of manufacture of substances having a nacreous appearance, and the like, consisting in placing in suspension in a transparent plastic substance a material composed of corpuscles forming minute reflectors in producing in the said substance a suitable current or flow by forcing the said substance through an orifice whereby the said reflecting corpuscles shall be systematically oriented, and in immobilizing the said corpuscles in this orientation by the solidification of the substance.

In testimony whereof I have hereunto set my hand on this 25th day of October A. D.,

EDWARD F. HIGGINS.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2543536 *Jun 19, 1947Feb 27, 1951Sherman RobertMetallic thermoplastic material
US2579815 *Nov 27, 1948Dec 25, 1951Celanese CorpExtrusion apparatus
US2648098 *Oct 4, 1949Aug 11, 1953Swedish Crucible Steel CompanyProcess for producing pearlescent plastic articles
US2943356 *Sep 30, 1955Jul 5, 1960Rasmussen Ole-BendtMethod of manufacturing a thin band of a high molecular substance which is axially orientated in another direction than the length direction
US3064312 *Jul 28, 1959Nov 20, 1962Bronfman BenjaminCompression molding of plastic materials
US3256560 *Apr 7, 1964Jun 21, 1966Continental Can CoDie for three-way oriented extrudate
US3420924 *May 13, 1965Jan 7, 1969Monsanto CoMethod for blow molding a container incorporating pearlescent material
US4797308 *Jul 6, 1987Jan 10, 1989The Mearl CorporationSimulated mother-of-pearl
US5374384 *Sep 22, 1992Dec 20, 1994Berks; Robert R.Modeling medium
Classifications
U.S. Classification264/108, 264/DIG.310, 106/415, 264/158
International ClassificationB44F9/08
Cooperative ClassificationY10S264/31, B44F9/08
European ClassificationB44F9/08