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Publication numberUS1608164 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 23, 1926
Filing dateNov 13, 1925
Priority dateNov 13, 1925
Publication numberUS 1608164 A, US 1608164A, US-A-1608164, US1608164 A, US1608164A
InventorsBronander Wilhelm B
Original AssigneeAmerican Mach & Foundry
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Package wrapping
US 1608164 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nov. 23 1926.

W. B. BRONANDER PACKAGE WRAPPI NG Filed Nov. 13, 1925 INVENTOR QQL Patented Nov. 23, 1926.

UNITED" STATES PATENT OFFICE.

WILHELM B. BRONANDER, or'MoN'rcLAIn; :gnw JERSEY, ASSIGNOR TO AMERICAN- nmcnmn & FOUNDRY comrrmnn CORPORATION 01 NEW JERSEY. v

PACKAGE WRAPPING.

Application filed November 13, 1925. Serial No. 68,863.

This invention relates to an improvement in package wrapping, particularly to packia 'e wrapping with cellulose hydrate and the 5 In wrapping packages or boxes of. candy, fruit, cigarettes, and numerous other com-v modities, the transparent-.- materials known ascellulose hydrate'and glassine paper are ,is

frequently used, to enhance the appearance of to the package or box, and to hermetically'seal its contents. Materials of thiskind havethe I 7 undesirable inherent property of shrinking with age and atmospheric changes, and asordinarily used on packa es or boxes, sur-- 1 5 rounding the same,'they s rinkand internal stresses are ,set up therein which result in tearing the material and thus defeating its purpose when packages'wrapped with it are stored for aconsiderable time, or exposed "to cold air forflatshort time." The shrinkage is' slow when the material is aging in an even temperature, I but very rapid in a; {sudden drop of temperature. It has been found to be practically impossible t0 allOWff0 I"tl iiS 2-3 shrinkage in wrapping'packages, for to wrap them loosely detracts fromthe smooth appearance that is regardedasessential.

It has: been. discovered '1 that this difiiculty can beovercome by. using cellulose hydrate 3. or similar material to cover the majorpart only of'thesurface or" surfaces of the package or .box .to be wrapped, andby using either transparent glassine -or common opaque paper, to cover. the remaindero'f the.

surface or surfaces of said package or box,

the edges of the 'two' materials being overlapped and sealed by wax the'elasticity of which permits the shrinking cellulose hy- I drate to creep or slip onv the paper, without 4 tearingfeither and without breaking the seal.

The. production of such a wrapper is the mainobjectof the present invention. An-

? other object/is its production by a method which is employed during the application of; -4 the wrapping materials .to the package or box. Withthese and other objects-not -spe cifically mentioned in view, the invention consists in certain constructions of wrapper,

and in certain 'methodsof making the same, a which will be herei'nafter'fully described and then specifically set forth in the claims hereunto appended.

In the accompanying drawings, which I form a part of thisspecification and in which like characters of reference indicate the the ends of the box 4, and

same or like parts, Fig. 1 is an inverted perspective view of a candy box having a Wrapper constructed in accordance with the inventlon; Fig. 2 is a side elevation of the same, shown partly in section; and Fig. 3 isan inverted plan View of the same, show ingparts of the bottom cover torn away.

In carrying-the invention into effect, there provided a sheet of wrapping material Which shrinks with age "and atm0spheric- 5 changes, and which is large enough to cover the major part only of a package or box to be-wrapped. There is further provided a smaller sheet, of wrapping paper, which is large enough to cover the remainder of' the package or box, and which has edges overlapping the edges of the shrinkable material. And .there-is further provided a seal of wax, between theoverlapping edges of the two sheets of wrapping material, the elasticity ofwh'ich permits the shrinking. material to creep or slip'on the paper as it, becomes smaller, whether slowlyas it'ages inaneven temperature, or rapidly as when it is. exposed to coldair. In the'best methods of 8 carrying the inventioninto effect, and where a box is to be wrapped,. the cellulose hydrate, or other" shrinkable material, .is folded over' the top, the sides, and .the ends of the "box,

.and under its bottom,but adjacent .the edges 5 .sile strength of the cellulose hydrate and paper, 1

Referring to the drawings, 4 indicates a candy box havin'gan overhanging top and bottom, and 5 is ;a cellulose hydrate wrapper so folded as to cover the top, the. sides,and having edges, as at 6, underlying the bottom o'fthebox, adjacentf. the edges of the latter.v A bottom coverflflf, oft-rans'parent waxed paper, which slightly smaller than the bottom-of'the box, has edges-overlapping the edges of the cellulose hydrate on the box bottom. -When* .the two wrapping materials are thus placed in position on the box, with theiredg es over-' lapping, heat is 'applied to the waxed'edges of the bottom cover 7 and this results in'uo hermetically sealing and holding the cellulose hydrate part of the wrapper and the paper part of the same together. The wax is on one side only of the paper.

As the cellulose hydrate, stretched snugly over the top, sides and ends of the box,

shrinks, the internal stresses set up therein by the resistance of the box cause it to pull its edges, underlying the bottom of the box, out from under the paper bottom cover 7 to some extent. The elasticity of the wax seal which holds the overlapped edges of the two parts of the wrapper together, permits this creeping or slipping of the cellulose hydrateon the paper, without breaking the seal. And since the holding force of the wax is less than the tensile strength of the cellulose hydrate and paper, the wax yields and neither the cellulose hydrate nor the paper is torn during the creeping movement. The

shrinkage of the cellulose hydrate around the edges of the bottom of the box is indicated before, the package or box thus wrapped waxed paper, the edges presents the desired smooth and pleasing appearance, not only when freshly wrapped but at all stages of cellulose hydrate shrinkage.

What is claimed is:

1. A package wrapper having a part made of material which shrinks with age and atmospheric changes, and a part made of paper, the edges of said parts being overlapped and sealed by wax which permits the shrinking material to slip on the paper without tearing either and without breaking seal.

2. A package wrapper having a part made of cellulose hydrate, and a part made of of said cellulose hydrate and said paper being overlapped and sealed by the wax of said paper which permits the shrinking cellulose hydrate to slip on said paper without tearing either and without breaking the seal. i

3. A package wrapper having a part made of a sheet of material which shrinks with age and atmospheric. chan es and covering the major part of the pac age, and a part made-of a smaller sheet of paper covering the remainder of said package, the edges of said parts being overlapped and sealed by wax which permits the shrinking matelines at 8, and its rial to slip on the paper'without tearing either and without breaking the seal.

4. Abox wrapper having a part made of a sheet of cellulose hydrate and covering the tops,- and underlying the bottom of the box adjacent its edges only, and a part made of a sheet of waxed paper slightly smaller than the bottom of the box and overlapping the edges of overlapping edges of the cellulose hydrate and paper being sealed by the wax of the paper which permits the sheet of cellulose hydrate to slip on the paper without tear ing either and without breaking the seal.

5. The method of wrapping a package, which consists in folding a sheet of wrapping material which shrinks with age and atmospheric changes over a part only of the the sides, and the ends of the box,

the sheet of cellulose hydrate, the h surface of the package, then placing a sheet of paper over the remainder of said surface with its edges overlapping the edges of the shrinking material, then sealing the overlapped edges by wax the elasticity of which permits the shrinking material to slip on the paper without tearing either and without breaking the seal. I

6. The method of wrapping a package, which consists in folding a sheet of cellulose hydrate over the major part only of the surface of the package, then placing a sheet of waxed paper over the remainder of said surface with its edges overlapping the edges of the cellulose hydrate, then heating the waxed paper where its edges overlap the edges of the cellulose 'hydrate to seal the overlapping edges together, the elasticity of the wax permitting the cellulose hydrate to slip on the paper as it shrinks, without tearing either and without breaking the seal.

7. The method of wrap ing a box, which consists in folding a s eet of cellulose hydrate over the top, the sides, and the ends of the box, tom of the box adjacent its edges only, then placing a sheet of waxed paper over substantially the whole of the bottom of the box with its edges overlapping the edges of the cellulose hydrate, then heating the waxed paper where its edges overla the edges of the cellulose hydrate to seal t e overlapping edges together, the'elasticity of the wax perwith its edges underlying the botmitting the cellulose hydrate to slip on the" WIL ELM, B. BRONANDER.

Classifications
U.S. Classification229/87.1, 493/334, 493/332, 493/386
International ClassificationB65D75/00
Cooperative ClassificationB65D75/004
European ClassificationB65D75/00B1