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Publication numberUS1608281 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 23, 1926
Filing dateMar 3, 1926
Priority dateMar 3, 1926
Publication numberUS 1608281 A, US 1608281A, US-A-1608281, US1608281 A, US1608281A
InventorsWeber John J
Original AssigneeWeber John J
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Surface ornamentation
US 1608281 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Patented Nov. 23, 1926,

UNITED. STATES JOHN J. WEBER, or WILME'rTE, ILLINOIS.

' sonr'acn onnannnrarron.

Application filed March 3, 1926. Serial No. 91,868.

This invention relates in general to surface'ornamentation, and one of the ob ects (.f the inventlon 1s to prov de an improved method of applying a coating or covering to be employed by theaverage person without necessitating the services of an expert.

To the attainment of these ends and the accomplishment of other new and useful objects as will appear, the invention consists in substantially the method hereinafter described and claimed and illustrated in theaccompanyi'ngdrawing, in which' Figure -1 is a plan view representing a portion of the finished product.

Figures 2 to 9 respectively are sectionalviews (greatly exaggerated) illustrating the different steps in the method.

Figure 10 is a sectional view of the fin-' ished product.

Throughout the specification the-method will be described in connection with producing ornamentation in simulation'of marble, but it is'to be understood that this is not to be considered as a term of limitation or that the method is to be limited to this product as the same method can be employed for producing an ornamentation in simulation of other articles or products.

In carrying into operation, the ornamentation is placed upon a supporting surface 10 which may bea wall, a sheet ofmaterial,

or any other surface which -is to be coated.

To this surface there is applied a paste like body 11 which may be of any suitable material of a semi-plastic or comparatively thick consistency, such as a putty like composition or thick paint. I p

The material is applied to the supporting object 10 in any suitable manner. such as by means of a brush, and is preferably applied unevenly throughout the area of the surface, as shown in Figure 2.; p

The material which has thus been applied is then manipulated in anys-uitable manner preferably by means of a stiff brush or adry sponge, so as to pull the material to roughen the same. as shownin Figure-3.

Suitable coloring matter. preferably in the form of paint, is then applied to the roughened surface at different places or a 1,608,281 PATENT OFFICE.

Figure 4, and according to the desire of the operator.

The product is then allowed to dry for a period of about one hour, after which the entire exposed surface together with the coloring matter: which has been applied thereto, is then smoothed down lightly as shown in Figure 5, which will cause the coloring matter to spread to some extent with the surface of the material constituting the body of the ornamentation.

The product is then'allowed to dry, after which the exposed surface is rubbed down by means of an abrasive material, such as pumice stone and water, the pumice stone used preferably being ina lump or block. This rubbing down step is-for the purpose of removin" thehi'gh spots of the exposed surface, an preferably so that a*large por-' tion of the exposed area will besmooth, but so that the exposed area will "contain crevices .or depressions at different points thereof.

After material 13, as shown ln Figure- 6, preferably of some dark color, and in the form of a liquid, preferably of the consistency of paint, is applied in any suitable manner, such as by means of a brush or .the like to the entire exposed area. After the coating has bing stone, preferably of dry pumice, is usedfor rubbing away the coating from the higher surfaces'causing the coating to enter into the crevices or lower. areas. This will nussurn spots on the surface, as indicated at 12 .in

this rubbing'operation, a coloring been applied a rubbe. accomplished by reason of the fact that I the surface is thus rubbed, while the paint like coating material is still wet with theresult that it will partially flow into .crevices or depressions.

The product is .then allowed to.- become thoroughly dry, after which this exposed surface is then again rubbed with an abrathe sive material and water, the abrasive material being preferably in the form of a lump or block of pumice stone. This operation is performed until all of the coloringmatter or coating 13 is rubbed off ofthehi h spots or areas 14 (as shown;.in"Figure .is then applied within the deep parts .or

while the walls of the low areas or crevices as v I crevices 15 as shown at 16 in Figure, 8, and

' the filling in the crevices will bind upon the surface and the coating is allowed to set for approximately ten minutes.

With another portion of the wax solution, there is mixed a dry zinc compositlon or any suitable White composition to produce a semi-plastic compound.

This compound is applied as at 18, to the remaining 10W portions or crevices throughout the entire surface so as to fill them up and also to give a coloring effect to thefinished product at different points through the exposed surface. This filling is allowedto set for approximately ten minutes, after which the entire surface is polished by means of a hard stone such as agate so as to produce a finished article or product.

The product resulting from this method will have the appearance of marble or a marble surface Which will .be of a pleasing and artistic appearance and the surface cannot be readily distinguished, from a "distance, from marble.

While the'preferred steps in the method have been herein specifically described, it is to be understoodthat some modification in the various steps may beemployed without departing from the spirit of this invention.

WVhat is claimed as new is 1. The method of producing surface ornamentation, which consists in unevenly apply-' ing to a surface a base of a semi-plastic or comparatwely thick consistency, then manipulating the surface to roughen the same,

then introducing coloring matter in different areas of the material, then allowing the same to partially dry, then partially smoothing the roughened material, then rubbing the exposedsurface to smooth off portions of the high spots, then coating the entire exposed surface and allowing the same to dry, then removing the last recited coating from the high spots, then applying a filler of a dif ferent color to fill in the crevices-or low areas, and finally when dry polishing the entire exposed surface of the coating material;

'2. The method of producing surface ornamentation, which consists in unevenly ap plying to a surface a base of a semi-plastic or comparatively thick consistency, then manipulating the surface to roughen the same, then introducing coloring matter in the different areas of the material, then allowing the same to partially dry, then partially smoothing the roughened material, then rubbing the exposed surfaceto smooth ol'l' portions of the'high spots, then coating theentlI'G/QXP'OSQd surface, and allowing the same to dry, then ren'iov-ing the last recited coating from the high spots, then applying on V adhesive in the crevices, then applying a fillerto fill in the crevices or low areas, and finally after the. entire exposed surface'is dry, polishing the same with a hard polishing implement. V

' 3. The method of producing surface ornamentation, which consists in unevenly applying to a surface a base of asemi-plastic or comparatively thick consistency, then manipulating the surface to roughen the same, then introducing coloring matter in different areas of the material, then allowing the same to partially dry, then partially smooth-' ing the roughened material, then rubbing the exposed surface to smooth olf portions of the high spots, then coating the entire exposed surface, and allowing the same to dry, thenremoving the last recited coating from the high spots, then applying a paste like wax solution, then applying azdry composition filler to fill in the crevices or low areas, then" allowing the fillerrto set, and finallyv polishing the entire exposed surface with a hard stone like implement.

4. The method of producing surface orna-, mentation, which consists in applying to a surface a base of a semi-plastic or compare-- tively thick consistency, then pulling t'e surface to roughen the same, then appl 'ng coloring matter 'in different areas and al owing the whole to dry, then partially smooth ing the exposed surface, "then, after dry, 106 removing with an abrasive and byr'ubbing process, some of the high spots ofthe exposed surface, then coating the entire exposed surface with a coloring material, then by means of an abrasive removing the coat- 11 ing from the high spots, then applying coloring material into the low areas, then applying a wax solution to the surface, then filling in the crevices or low areas with a hing down the high spots, then coating the entire surface with a coating material, then-- rubbing away the coating from the 'high spots, then introducing coloring material into the low places or crevices,'and finally 1 polishing the entire exposed surface.

6. The method of producing surface ornarubbing down the coating from the high 10 mentation, which consists in. applying a spots, then applying a wax like coating to plastic substance to such surface, then the entire surface, then introducing'coloring roughening the exposed surface of such mamaterial into the low places or crevices, and

I teriai, then applying coloring matter at diffinally polishing the entire surface.

ferent points, then partially smoothing out In testimony whereof I have signed my 15 the material and coloring matter, then rubname to this specification, on this 26th day bing down thehi h spots, then coating the of February, A. D. 1926.

"entiresurface wit a coating material, then JOHN J. WEBER.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2615270 *Mar 18, 1950Oct 28, 1952Julius AdlerMethod of producing random color patterns
US3058164 *Mar 16, 1960Oct 16, 1962Charles W HowardMethod of making artificial stone
US3415670 *Apr 1, 1965Dec 10, 1968Mcdonald Photo Products Inc.Method and composition for surface finishing photographs or the like
US4284453 *Sep 17, 1979Aug 18, 1981Consolidated Papers, Inc.Method of imparting color highlights or shadows to a textured decorative laminate
US5089351 *Jun 27, 1990Feb 18, 1992Baarns Antoinette WProcess for creating artworks by application of crayon and ink
US6228427 *Apr 1, 1999May 8, 2001Wanger Holding AnstaltProduction process for 3-D images
EP0075646A1 *May 5, 1982Apr 6, 1983Dai Nippon Insatsu Kabushiki KaishaProcess for producing coincidently embossed decorative sheets
Classifications
U.S. Classification427/264, 427/277, 427/265
International ClassificationB44F9/00, B44F9/02
Cooperative ClassificationB44F9/02
European ClassificationB44F9/02