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Publication numberUS1610334 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 14, 1926
Filing dateJul 30, 1925
Priority dateJul 30, 1925
Publication numberUS 1610334 A, US 1610334A, US-A-1610334, US1610334 A, US1610334A
InventorsTheodore Smith
Original AssigneeTheodore Smith
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Handle and method of making the same
US 1610334 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

u w E WM E m w E 5 6 W 0 .M w h y T m m m m R M 3 Dec. 14 1926.

ATTORNEYS.

Patented Dec. i l,

THEODORE SMITH, OF NEW YORK, N. I

HANDLE AND METHOD 01E MAKING THE SAME.

Application filed July 30, .1925, Serial No. 47,120. Renewed October 25, 1926.

The present invention relates to handles such as iorm parts of umbrellas, canes, and the like and methods of making the same.

Handles of the type forming parts of umbrellas and canes which embody trimmings or ornamentation, hitherto, have be n produced by inlaying in portions thereof materials, usually metal, such as sterling sil- Yer. A handle under the usual method has grooves cut therein in certain portions thereof, and strips of metal are fitted into the grooves. The metal strips are then pinned or riveted to the handle portions and are finally filed down flush with the adjacent portions of the handle. This method of hand work is not only expensive, but when the handle which is usually of wood dries out, the pins or rivets become loose and the inlaid strips come off. It follows therefore that the results obtained are impractical and unsatisfactory, and besides, this method oi. inlaying is done after the handle has been shaped and finished and is usually done by silver-smiths.

The present method for obtaining an inlaid effect is to cut the handle in sections before it is shaped or finished. Where the in laid effects are to occur solid pieces of metal of desired thickness are arranged between the several sections produced by the cutting. then all of the sections and metal inserts are doweled or glued or otherwise joined firmly. These steps are carried out while the handle is still in the rough, and as the metal inserts will be of a soft nature such as white metal. the entire handle and metal inserts can be worked down, shaped and finished at one time. The result of the practice mentioned is the production of a strong handle with a trimmed or ornamental appearance of substantial inlaid efiect. Costs are reduced to a minimum, and the necessity for skilled artisans is obviated.

Gther features of the invention will appear from the embodiments of the invention which by way or". example are described in the following specification and illustrated in the accompanying drawing, in which:

Figure 1 is an elevation of a handle embodying the structural features produced in, the practice or" the method of the present 111- vention. A

Fig. 2 is a side elevation partly in section showing the structural features of the handle shown in Fig. 1.

Fig. 3 is an elevation of, another type of handle and embodying modificationofthc structural features of the present invention.

Fig. 4 is a view of the end of the handle shown in Fig. 3. p v

:As before stated the production of a bandle under the present method is accomplished by cutting the same to produce a preferred number of sections from the handle according to the'trimmed or ornamental appearance desired, ln Figs. 1 and 2 the co p handle. 10 is shownas being cut to provide.

a piece ll and pieces 12. Pieces of metal 13,

14: and15 are utilized. These pieces of metal are sandwiched or placed respectively between thehandle 10 and pieces 11 and 12 as shown most clearly in Fig. 2. In the present instance this is accomplished by the employment of dowel pins 16 which extend through the piece 11 and metal pieces 13 and 141 and the opposite ends thereof are respectively disposed in holes 17 in the handle and holes 18 in the pieces 12. Aside from the use oi: the dowel pins 16 for joining the several parts together the parts will be treated to an application of glue to thereby more effectively bind the parts to constitute a structural integrality. The pieces 12 will be glued to the metal piece 15 and these three parts may then be joined to complete the handle.v V

In Figs. 3 and 4 the handle embodiesa plurality of pieces 20 which are cut trom'the handle and a plurality of metal pieces 21'. anda piece 22. The metal pieces 21 extend through transversely, whereas the piece 22 is disposed transversely substantially at a rightangle with respect to the pieces 21. The showing in Figures 3 and d is made to bring out the fact that any preferred relative disposition of the pieces may be resorted to, to obtain different ornamental appearances with inlaid effect.

From the foregoing it will be understood that the method of producing an inlaid effect in handles or similar articles consists firstin cutting the article while in the rough or. un-- finished state in any desired number of sec tions, then interposing between the sections pieces of comparatively dilierent materials, then joiningall of the sections and pieces in any preferred manner, and then finally shaping the work to the desired conformation consistent with the remaining portion of the handle to complete the same.

I claim: V

1, The method of making an article of trim or ornamented inlaid appearance which consists in utilizing an unfinished article, cutting the unfinished article to provide a number of pieces 01": the article, utilizing pieces of material difierent from the pieces of the article, joining all of the pieces to the article remnant to obtain a diversified structural unit, andshaping the unit to complete the article.

2. The method of making anarticle of trim or ornamented inlaid appearance Which consists in utilizing an unfinished article,

cutting the unfinished article, to provide a number of pieces of the article, utilizing pieces of metal, joining all of the pieces to the article remnant to obtain a diversified structural unit, and shaping the unit to complete the article.

-3. The method of making an article of trim or ornamented inlaid appearance Which consists in utilizing an unfinished article, cutting the unfinished article, to provide a number of pieces of the article, utilizing pieces of material difl'erent from the pieces of the article, joining all of the pieces tothe article remnant by the use of Viiastening elements Which extend through certain of the pieces and by the use of glue to obtain a diversified structural unit, and shaping the unit to complete the article.

4. An article of manufacture comprising a major portion, and minor portions, certain of said minor portions being in the nature of plates arranged and secured between the other minor portions to produce a diversified ornamented appearance.

5. An article of manufacture comprising a major portion, and minor portions, certain of said minor portions being in the nature ofplates arranged between the other minor portions to produce a diversified ornamented appearance, and securing means for joining the minor portions'to the major portions.

THEODORE SMITH.

Classifications
U.S. Classification16/110.1, D08/303, 294/26, 135/65, 428/458, 403/292
International ClassificationA45B9/02, A45B9/00
Cooperative ClassificationA45B9/02
European ClassificationA45B9/02