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Publication numberUS1610578 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 14, 1926
Filing dateSep 22, 1924
Priority dateSep 22, 1924
Publication numberUS 1610578 A, US 1610578A, US-A-1610578, US1610578 A, US1610578A
InventorsEverett N Murphy
Original AssigneeStevens Partition & Floor Dead
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Wall construction
US 1610578 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 14, 192e. 1,610,578 Y E. N. MURPHY WALL CONSTRUCTION Filed sept. 22, 1924 s sheets-sheet 1 gagna www' i Dec. 14, 1926.

E. N. MURPHY WALL CONSTRUCTION Filed Sept 22, 1924 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 Dec. 14 1.926.

E. N. MURPHY WALL CONSTRUCTION s 'sheets-sheet Filed Sept. 22, 1924 lzo Patented Dee. i4, 1926.

UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE.

EVERETT N. MURPHY, OF CHICAGO, ILLINOIS. ASSIGNOR TO STEVENS PARTITION & FLOOR DEADENERCOMPANY. OF CHICAGO, ILLINOIS, A CORIEORATION OF ILLINOIS.

WALL CONSTRUCTION.

Application filed September 22, 1924. Serial No.,738,983.

This invention relates to sound prooiing, and more particularly to an improved method ot and means for sound proofing partitions and walls whereby the transmis-- sion of soundvibiations i'roin room to room effectively prevented.

One of the. objects of my invention is to provide a construction which will be efficient, durable,'light, and cheap, and which can be quickly installed, Further objects will appear from the following detailed description.

In the drawings, in which several embodiments ot my invention are shown:

Figure l is a vertical cross sectional view through one side of a room illustrating one of the embodiments of my' invention, having the iinishing walls, ceiling and floor in sound proof relation with the inner supporting structure Fig. Qis a disassembled view of sound insulators. I employ in' sound proofing partitions; .y

Fig. 3 isa face view of the side wall, with portions broken away to show the construetion; v i f Fig. 4 is a detail sectional view of one of `the wall insulators, taken on line 4 4; of

Fig. l;

Fig. 5 is a similar' view taken on line 5-5 ot' Fig. 8, but with the section taken at right angles to Fig. 3;

Fig. 6 shows a ot the insulators;

y, Fig. 7 is aV view similar to Fig. 1 but illustrating a different torni ot inner supporting structure;

Fig. Sis a horizontal cross sectional vien7 ot a vthin partition which is sound prooted in a manner similar to that of Fig. l;

Fig. S) is a view similar to Fig. S but illustrating ,a loini ot inner supporting strncture and round prooling means which permit the. tinishing wall oiI- a. partition to be spaced apart a minimum distanceg-and Fig. 10 is a still further disclosure of disposing the sound insulating means between the .finishing walls ot a partition.

Building construction invariably di'li'ers. Each building` is de'igned according to the particular use to which it will beput oi' to the particular needs of the owners. Sonie buildings re Siri4 proof, others arenot. Hence,

detail of the face oi' .one

it will benoted that the inner supporting structure of the finishing wall will, in many cases. be different. My invention is capable ot embodiment in buildings having these different inner supporting structures inasmuch as the fundamental principle of breaking the solids between walls may be employed in a variety of Ways, and my.l improved sound insulating means, or sound insulators may be used to hold the walls apart in such relation.

I shall describe a number of such embodiments, one ot which may be used where the inner supporting structure is either that of anoutside wall of the building, or the supporting structure ot an inner wall of the building. Another embodiment is where the finishing walls ot' the lath and plaster of adjacent rooms are spaced apart, and the inner supporting structure serves as the means of carrying my improved sound insulating means between the wails. In another embodiment, the distance between walls is taken into Consideration for the' sake of economy, and'consequently, this inner supporting structure is such that these finishing Walls are brought together a minimum distance. I shall now 'lescribe these einbodiments and iny iiiiproved sound insulating means,

The sound insulated partition illustrated, partie ilarly in Fig. l ot' the drawings, comprises an inner supporting wall or structure 2 and a facing or tnishing wall 3, both ot' which are spaced apart in sound prooi'I relation by a plurality of sound insulators 4. The inner supporting structure 2 may be of tile, as illustrated in this ligure, or it may be of any other well known construction.4

Insulators 4l, illustrated in an exploded view in Fig. 2, yserve to break Contact between the solids ot' these walls and provide a souiul-proof non-vibratory transmitting Contact, whereby -neither sound nor vibrations may travel from wall to wall. This is accomplished by furnishing the insulators -jt in the forni of cushioning members provided with sound or vibration absorbing means. soA that there will be no direct solid contact between the parts. It will be remembered that these insulators l may be ot' a design ditt'erent from that shown, but in their preierred form they may be furnished with a.

plate 6 having laterally turned sides 7, which form socket-like or cup-shaped members. These members are adapted to receive an 1n- '."terior lining of felt or cattle hair 8 in thel forinfof` a pad con forming to the inner configuration "of they in einbers. A U-shaped strip 9 is inserted'i-n -the feltkpad 8 and a second felt pad 10 is placed therein. Arivet 11 then extends centrally through 'these parts (including said felt pads 8 and 10), one end of which rivet may be riveted over or otherwise suitably held in plate 6, as ndicated at 12, while the opposite end may be provided with a head 13 for lholding washer 14 on the rivet.

Strip 9 may be apertured at lto permit rivet 11 to pass therethrough, the aperture,

however, being of sncli size as to prevent contact between the strip and the rivet. 'The rivet- 11 is permitted, however, to have slight freedom of movement at each end in order to allow relative movement between the two parts of the insulators 1, caused by `vibration in the walls in a direction not parallel to rivet 11. This flexibility in the construction of cach insulator is desirable, because it serves to check' transmission of this relative movement or vibration between walls. For the vibration parallel to the rivet 11, the middle portions of pads 8 and 10 serve as the absorbing medium. Vibration in this direction is, likewise, not transniitted through the rivet 11, due to the latters non-solid contact with the strip 9, and

" also to the fact that plate 14 is maintained in spaced relation with the strip 9 by the sides 16 of the pad 10.

Pad 8 serves to embrace the strip 9, so that movement of the member 6 in any direction, as the result of the facing or finishing wall 3 vibrating, will not destroy the sound proof or nonvibration transmitting contact between tliese part-s 9 and 6. The latter are held together in this relation by rivet il,

' vand pad 10 serves, in one respect, to hold the rivet out o`f direct physical contact with strip 9, in order to maintain broker contact between solids.

The facing or finishing wall, illustrated in Fig. 1, is of relatively simple construction, comprising essentially upright channel irons 18, to which metal lathing 19. or the like, may be attached, and a coat of wall plaster 20 laid on the lathina- 19. This construction is somewhatoptional and may be changed without departing from the scope of the present invention.

Referring to Fig. 6, plate 6 is provided with a pair of lugs 21 which are struck outwardly therefrom and are disposed on opposite sides of the apertures through which rivet 11 passes. As illustrated in Fig. 4, these lugs 21 are spaced to lie on opposite sides of each channel iron 18. A wire 22, or like tying member, may pass through proof buildings. In the present disclosure,

verticalbars 25 may be secured thereto in any suitable manner, say by toggle bolts 26.

Strips 9 of each insulator 4 may be furnished with feet 27 adapted to be suitably secured to vertical bars 25 at 28. This constitutesthe solid contact between the inner snpportingfgh structure 2 and the insulator 4, it being noted, moreover, that this solid contact is only with the strip 9.

The floor construction shown in Fig. 1 comprises the lower rough floor 30 supported in any suitable manner, and upper finishing ileor 31 secured to a nailing strip 32, supports or chairs 33 on which the nailing strip 32 is supported, and a pad or cushion 34 einbracing' the nailing strip 32 and held in place by the chairs 33.

Channel irons 18 may rest on a pad or cushion 3a which is held in place by means of a chair 35 corresponding somewhat to they chairs 33. Chair 35 comprises a cushionholding portionv 36 and 'a pair of spaced legs 37, which bear on the lower iioor 30, to which they aie secured by suitable securing means 38. As illustrated in Fig. 3, insulators 4 aie provided spaced apart in rows, each row being fastened to a channel iron 18. In assemblingthese channel irons 18, the lower ends are bolted to a horizontally disposed bar 39 adapted to be seated in the cushions 34. lVith this construction, it will be noted that there is no rigid connection between the supports for the lath and plaster and the rough floor 30, the only connection being through the cushions 34. By this construction various advantageous features are ohtained. The complete isolation of the wall or partition from the lower floor inav be obtained, that is, the nails oi' other securing means do not extend through the cushions so as to connect the parts mechanically.

The ceilinbi` construction of the embodi-4 ment comprises a sound insulated structure. also preventing the transinisson ot' sound or vibration to or from the floor above. A plurality of horizontally disposed stringrei's in the form of channel irons i0, similar to the vertical channel irons "i8 of the facing or finishing wall 3, and provided in two roiws. one above the other,.and at right' angles to each other, comprise the part to which the lath 41 may be fastened, the lath being secured preferably to the lower row. The channel irons Ll() of this lower row have their outer ends suitably secured to the adjoining upper ends of the vertical channel irons 18,

say by tying as indicated at 42 in Fig. 1. A coat of plaster 43 is laid on the lath 41.

A plurality of cushioning supports 45 is provided for suspending the ceiling construction in sound proof and non-vibratory transmitting relation. Supports 45 may be formed of U-shaped pad rests 46, having upwardly -extending apertured flanges 47 adapted to be suspended from the floor above by suitable securing means 48. Pads 49 of cattle hair or felt seat in the pad rests 46, the bott-om portion of the latter being apertured at 50 to permit the shanks 5l of hooks 52. to extend upwardly, so that. the heads 53 of Shanks 5l hold the inverted transversely extending U-shaped straps 54 in a straddled position across the pads 49 andnpad rests 4G. It will be noted that solid contact exists between hooks 52 and inverted U-shaped straps 54, but that these straps 54 are out of contact with the pad rests 4G, except through the pads 49. Hooks 5:2 arelooped about the upper rou7 of the horizontal channel irons 4() for supporting this portion of the ceiling construction. It 'will further be noted that the upper and lower rows of these horizontal channel irons 40 are, oftcoursc, suitably secured to each other, as for instance, by tying, indicated at 53.

For preventing the transmission of sound and vibration across the space between the inner supportingI structure 2 and the finishing or facing wall 3, and also across the s ace between the ceilingconstruction and tie floor above, these spaces are provided with layers or quilts 55 and 56, respectively, of cattle hair, felt, or like material. It .will be noted in Fig. l that these quilts 55 and 5Gl overlap at their adjoining ends whereby these spaces are disconnected or separated from each other to prevent sound or vibration in either space from being transmitted to the other. I have found that these quilts tend tov absorb sound-vibration and prevent its rebound between the inner supporting structure and finishing wall of the partition,

- -lthe same effect also taking place between the "ceiling construction and floor above.

The `-space'between the finishing floor 31 and lower floor 30 may be filled with a dry, cellular, fire proof aggregate, such as dry cindcrs. This prevents all of the above three spaces from acting as resonating chambers to produce what is known as a drum effect.

Quilt 55 may be laid against the side of the inner supporting structure 2 and the toggle bolts 2G allowed to pass through the saine, thereby pern'iitting the vertical bars or members to serve the dual function of holding tliequilt 55 in position and also of retaining the U-strips 9 against the inner wall 2. Quilt 56 may be placedacioss the horizontal channel irons 40 in any suitable l manner.

In the embodiment of my invention illustrated in F ig. 7, the inner supporting structures of the wall and the ceiling are also of a well known construction and are usually employed in non-fire proof structures. The

inner supporting structure of the wall comprises the usual studding 65, preferably of 2 x 4 inch boards suitable spaced apartl on centers, for receiving the sound insulating means embodying my invention. In this instance the insulators 4 are practically of thel same construction, as heretofore described,"

fastened, to receive the heads of the" bolts. Nuts G8 on the opposite end of bolts G6 allor. t`

the parts 6 and 9 to be drawn as c losetogether as desired. Feet 27, of part 9 of each insulator 4, may be secured to the studding (35 by nails 69, or the-like.

The inner supporting structures of the ceiling of this embodiment comprise a rough floor fastened to joists 7l. spaced by bridging 72. To thelower side of the joists 7l, the furring strips 73 are nailed. In this instance, the insulators 4 are laid fiatwise and the feet 27 of each insulator are fastened to the furring strips 73. Bolts 66 are permit.- ted to extend downwardly through apertured purlin laid upon transverse channelirons 7 6. It will be noted that the lath and plaster of the ceiling are fastened to the channel irons76. The drum effect between tlie inner supporting structures of the wall and ceiling and the finishing wall and finishing ceiling, due to the sound rebounding in tie spaces therebetween, is prevented by quilts 78 and 79, respectively, of cattle hair, felt, or like material. which tend to absorb the sound. The quilts may be continuous with respect to each other, if so desired, and lit tightly in the upper corners where the inner supporting structures of the wall and ceiling meet. Quilts 78V and 79 are heldagainst the studding 65 and the furring strips 73 by the nails passing through the feetr27 and securing the insulators 4 in place;

In this embodiment of my invention, the lioor may be of the saine construction as previously described.

In connection with the embodiments of inv invention just described, it will be observed .that with the sound insulators 4 used in the manner shown, in partitions and ceilings,

having the inner Vsupporting structure described, a very compact sound deadening structure may be realized.

An even more compact arrangement is illustrated'in Fig. 8 wherein the facing or finishing Walls are spaced -closer together and furring'58 is employed. The studs alternately receive the insulators of the opposed facing or finishing walls and are olfcentered inwardly toward each other in order to bring these walls close together. l I preferably provide a pluality of channel members 59 which are adapted to receive the furring 58. Insulators 4 may be fastened in practically the same manner as before described, that is, each strip 9 may be arranged to have its feet 27 lying against the member 59, and be secured thereto,as indicated at 60 in F ig. 5. The quilt in this instance, is wound in a zig-zag manner about the furring 58, so that it may be attached by the nails 6l tothe sides of thc strips opposite the insulators.` Thus the quilt forms a continuous sound insulation barrier in the space between the facing walls and prevents the so-called drum etl'ect hereinbefore mentioned.

In Fig. 9 I have illustrated an embodiment affording still further compactness of the I sound deadening and inner supporting structure. The structure shown is used chieiiy for inside partitions of buildings. The finishing walls 804 and 8l are walls of adjoining rooms and aie spaced apart a minimum distance. Vertical channel irons 84 may be provided to receive the feet 27 of part. 9 of each insulator 4. The opposite sides of the insulators are secured to members 85 by means of bolts 86, which are similar tothe rivets l1 or bolts 436 of the embodiments liei'einbefoie described. A quilt 87 of felt, cattle hair or the like, for preventing a drum effect of and tending to absorb the -iil vertical channel irons 92 ispassed between these walls, being fastened to the channel` irons 84 by bolts '88, which draw the quilt tightly into the channels.

It will be noted that the insulators 4 are disposed in vertical rows which alternate in their position with respect to the walls 80 and 8l. Thus these walls may be brought as close together as possible and supported with maximum efficiency by a minimum nuinberof sound insulators 4.

In Fig. 10, a sound proof construction is illustrated which has the opposed finishing walls and 91 of a partition fastened to the opposite sides of the insulators 4. The lath and plaster of wall 90 are secured to preferably by means' of bolts 93 which secure in position the feet 27 of part 9. The lat'h and plaster of wall 91 are secured to vertical channel irons 94, preferably by means of a bolt 95 which is similar to the bolt 86 of Fig. 9. A quilt 96 for preventing the drum effect of the sound vibrations in the space between these walls is passed between each insulator 4 and the iron 94.

In this embodiment of my invention, as

well as any of the other embodiments described, the sound insulating or proofing means are so arranged with respect to the inner supporting structures that the solids between the walls are broken. 7()

While I have illustrated a plurality of embodiments of my invention, it is apparent that many modifications therein may occur to those skilled in the art. I desire, therefore, that my invention be limited 7:, only by the scope of the prior art or by the statements of the appended claims.

I claim:

l. Sound proofing means for a building partition comprising a member adapted to so be fastened to an inner supporting structure, a cooperating member adapted to be secured to a facing or finishing wall, cushioning means arranged between said membeis whereby the latter are held out of solid 85 contact with each other, and interconnecting means for said members.

2. Sound proofing means for a building partition comprising a member adapted to be fastened to an inner supporting struca0 ture, a cooperating member adapted to be secured to a facing or finishing Wall, cushioning means arranged between said members whereby the latter are held out of solid contact with each other. and interconnect- 95 ing means for said members, said interconnecting means being in solid contact with one of said members.

3. Sound proofing means for a building partition comprising a plurality of unitary 100 elements ,spaced at predetermined distances for holding a facing or finishing wall out of physical contact with an inner supporting structure or wall, said elements cushioning or absorbing sound vibration in all directions in the plane of the wall and having means to prevent its transmission in a plane transverse to the wall.

4. Sound proofing means for a building partition comprising a plurality of unitary cushioning elements for holding a Ifacing or finishing wall out of solid contact with an inner supporting structure or wall, said elements serving to cushion or absorb sound vibration in all directions in the plane of the wall.

5. In a building construction, the combination of an inner supporting structure or wall, a facing or finishing wall, means for breaking the solids of said walls whereby sound and vibration transmission is ett'ectively prevented, said means comprising sound insulators spacing said walls apart, said sound insulators iiicludinga pair or interconnected cooperating members and a cushioning pad serving as the only physical contacting element between said members.

6. In a building construction, the combination of an inner supporting structure or wall, a facing or finishing wall, sound insubetween, said means comprising rigid members attached tothe inner wall, cushion retaining members provided with sides for embracing said rigid members, a plurality of cushion pads between said member, and

1o means for interconnecting said members together with the cushion pads interposed.

7. In a building construction, the combination of an inner supporting structure or wall, a facing or finishing wall, sound insulating means for spacing said walls apart and breaking the solids between walls to preventsound and vibration transmission, said sound insulating means comprising cooperating members, one of which is rigidly fixed to one wall and the other of which is fastened to lthe other-wall, al cushion pad between said cooperating members, and means for interconnecting and permitting relative movement between said cooperating members without destroying or impairing the non-vibration ktransmitting contact therebetween, said cushion .padI servii'igas the only physical Contact between these said members. y

8. In a building construction, the combination of an inner supporting structure or wall, a facing or finishing wall, sound insulating means for breaking the solids between walls toprevent sound transmission, said sound insulating means comprising a rigid vmember fixed to said inner wall, and a cooperating cushion v'retaining member Inovable with said facing orinishing wall when the latter isvibrated Iby soundwaves'strik- 40 ing thereagainst or' transmitted thereto, a

-cushioning pad interposed between said rigid member and said cooperating cushionl retaining .member, said cushioning pad serving as the onlyl physical contact between these said members, andan interconnecting element for said members.

9. In a building construction, the combiwall, a facing or nisliing Wall, sound insulating means for spacing said walls apart,

said sound insulatingmeans comprising a pair ot' centrally aligned members, o ne of which is Aadapted to embrace the other, cushioning pads interposed betwcenl said mem-' 5D bers, and an element for :interconnecting connecting said walls comprising a rigid member fixed to the inner wall and a second member embracing at least a portion of said rigid member, sound cushioning means between said members, an interconnecting element for said members, and means for connecting said secondineinber to said Jurring strips.

l1. In a building construction, the combi-l nation ofi an inner supporting structure or wall, a facing or 'ljinishing wall spaced therefrom including `iuiring strips, lathiiig secured to said fui-ring strips and a coat of plaster on said lath, sound insulators for connecting said walls comprising a rigid member fixed to the inner wall and a second member embracing at least a portion of said rigid member, cushioning means between said members, an interconnecting element for said members, and means for connecting said second member to said furring strips, said means also being arranged to pass through and to hold said lath against said 'urring strips.

12. In a building construction, the com.-

b'ination of an inner supporting structure or wall, a facing or' finishing wall, sound insulators between said walls comprising aligned apertured members, a cushioning pad interposed between said members, said cushioning pad serving as the only physical contact between said members and also between said Walls, an interconnecting element for passing centrally through the apertures of said members, a plate adjacent one end of said element, and a second cushioning pad between said plate and the other member.

23. In a building construction, the combination with a 'structure including two walls, of sound insulators between said walls, each including a pair of members and a pair ofcusliioning pads, one oi' which pads may be interposed between said members, an element for interconnecting said members in a manner to permit movement ot one member against` theothcr member' by the vibration .of either wall, a-V plate-like member at one nation of' an inner supporting structure or end of said element, the other ot said pads being interposcdbetwcen said plate and one of said members.

14. Means for Spacing a facing or finishing wall Jfrom an inner supporting structure or-p'allyin sound proofing relation comprising apziir'ot,relatively movable cooperating cushion--rctiiningcinembcrs, cushioning pads ifor said linem'b'ers, andan interconnection between said members and said cushioning padswhereby the ,vibrating morement of said facing or finishing wall in a plurality of directions will be absorbed by said cushioning pads.

l5i In a building construction, the combinationo-i an inner supporting structure or wall, a facing or iinishing wall spaced therefrom, sound insulating means between said walls, said sound insulating means functioning to prevent transmission of sound through the solids of these walls and also through the air-space between the walls, said means com rising units connecting the facing or finishingwall yto the inner wall but providing non-vibration transmitting contact therebetween, a layer of sound absorbing material between said walls so as to prevent a continuous air-space from one wall to the other, and means for fastening said sound absorbing material in position. A

16. In a building construction, the combination of an inner supportin structure or wall,`a facing or finishing wal spaced therefrom, sound insulating means between said walls, said sound insulating means .func-- tioning to prevent transmission of sound through the solids of these walls and also through the air-space between the walls, said means comprising units connecting the facing or finishing wall to the inner` wall but providing non-vibration transmitting contact therebetween, a layer of sound absorbing material between said walls so as to prevent a continuous air-space from one wall to the.

other, and means for fastening said material in position, said means comprising a plurality of spaced strips secured to and holding said material against said inner wall.

17. In a building construction, the combination of an inner supporting structure or wall, a facing or finishing wall spaced therefrom, sound insulating means between said walls, said sound insulating means functioning to -prevent transmission of sound through thesolids of these walls and also through the air-space between the walls, said means comprising units connecting the facing or finishing wall to the inner wall but providing non-vibration transmittingl contact therebetween, va layer of sound absorbing material between said walls so as to prevent a continuous air-space from one wall to the other, and means for fastening said material in position, said means comprising a plurality of spaced strips/secured to and i" holding said material against said inner wall, and fastening means for attaching said units to said strips.

18. In a building construction, the combination of an inner supporting structure or wall, a facing or finishing wall spaced therefrom, a lower floor, sound insulating means between said walls, said sound insulating means functioning to prevent transmission of sound through the solids of these walls and also through the air-space between the walls, said means comprising units connect-- ing the outer wall to the inner wall but providing non-vibration transmitting contact therebetween, a layer of sound absorbing material between said walls so vas to prevent a continuous air-space from one wall to the other, means for fasteningsaid material in position, and sound insulating means for supporting said outer wall upon said lower floor.

19. In a sound proofing building construction art, the combination of a room provided with its finishing fioor out of' physical contact with the walls, a lower floor, cushioning means resting on said lower floor for supporting said finishing floor in sound proof relation, and cushioning means also resting on said lower floor for supporting said walls` 1n sound proof relation with respect to said lower floor and for holding the same out of physical contact with said finishing floor. 20. A sound proofing structure :tor building partition, comprising the combinatijon with a plurality of cushioning elements for normally breaking solid contact between opposed finishing walls and an inner supporting structure, of means associated with said cushioning elements for anchoring said opposed walls to said inner supporting structure without destroying the sound proof relation provided by said cushioning elements. 21. In a building construction, the combination with a finishing wall and the strucmeans including a layer of'sound insulating l material and cushioning elements serving to anchor the finishing wall to said structure.

23. In a building construction, the combination of a floor and a partition of a room, a finishing wall for said partition and -resting on said iioor, and sound insulating means for supporting said finishing wall upon said floor and against said partition, and a layer of sound insulating material between said partition and said finishing wall.

24:. In a building construction, the combination with an inner wall or partition structure, of a face finishing wall therefor, and vibration insulating means securing said finishing wall to said wall or partition struc-w nation with an inner Wall or partition struc-` 27. In a building construction, a partition structure including two face finishing Walls,

vibration insulating means securing said 'facev Walls 1n position and preventing `solid contact between them, and a layer of Vibration absorbing material between said face Walls.

28. In a building construction, an inner Wall or partition structure, a face finishing 4Wall therefor, Vibration insulating means securing said face Wall to said structure, and a layer of vibration absorbing material in the rear of said face Wall.

In witness whereof, I have hereunto subscribed niy name. 4

EVERETT MURPHY.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2717664 *Jul 18, 1949Sep 13, 1955Richard RandMetal panel construction
US3416274 *Oct 8, 1965Dec 17, 1968NasaFlexibly connected support and skin
US3604173 *Dec 2, 1968Sep 14, 1971Rune Ingmar DouglasResilient floor
US3899857 *Dec 12, 1973Aug 19, 1975Mochizuki MitsuoFraming element and its supporting device for laying interior boarding on foundation structure
US4110948 *Mar 11, 1977Sep 5, 1978Maier Jr Adolph JThermal insulating clips for metal insulated walls and roofs
US4287839 *Nov 30, 1979Sep 8, 1981Uhde GmbhApparatus for lining the inner walls of industrial furnaces
US4873805 *Jul 21, 1988Oct 17, 1989Ting Raymond M LConnecting means of curtainwall supporting mullions
US5388380 *Jul 13, 1992Feb 14, 1995Robbins, Inc.Anchored/resilient sleeper for hardwood floor system
US6615559Apr 4, 2001Sep 9, 2003Owens Corning Fiberglas Technology, Inc.Resilient construction member, especially a unitary construction member
US6755003Dec 11, 1998Jun 29, 2004Owens Corning Fiberglas Technology, Inc.Resilient construction member
US7793477 *Jan 4, 2008Sep 14, 2010Epic Metals CorporationRoof deck and method of manufacturing a clip
EP0025208A2 *Sep 3, 1980Mar 18, 1981M. Faist KGConnecting device for the sound and/or heat insulated fastening of curtainwall panels, boards or other constructional elements, respectively fastening devices for such constructional elements
WO2000034594A1 *Dec 3, 1999Jun 15, 2000Brien Bernini Frank C OResilient construction member
Classifications
U.S. Classification52/402, 52/407.1, 52/512, 52/781.3, 52/347, 52/480, 52/508
International ClassificationE04B1/82, E04B2/74
Cooperative ClassificationE04B2001/8254, E04B1/8218, E04B2001/8272, E04B2/7411, E04B2/7412
European ClassificationE04B2/74C2P, E04B2/74C2F, E04B1/82D