Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS1612291 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 28, 1926
Filing dateDec 29, 1925
Priority dateDec 29, 1925
Publication numberUS 1612291 A, US 1612291A, US-A-1612291, US1612291 A, US1612291A
InventorsJackson George P
Original AssigneeJackson George P
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Indoor golf game
US 1612291 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec; 28 T926. 1,612,291

, G. P. JACKSON INDOOR GOLF GAME Filed Dec. 29, 1925- 2 sheets-sheet 1 Dec. 28 1926.

G. P. JACKSON INDOOR GGLF GAME 2 Sh'eets-Sht 2 Filed Dec. 29, 1925 crazier GEORGE P. JACKSON, YONKERS, NEW YORK.

INDOOR GOLF GAME.

Application filed December 29, 1925. Serial No. 78,147.

My invention relates to'devices for playing indoor'golf, 'more particularly the putting feature of the game, and has for its primary object to provide an' improved construction whereby a putting surface will be afiorded capable of a bodily adjustment from the horizontal and also capable of undulatory adjustment as to its surface, whereby a variable rolling contour will be pro duced, which may be changed at will. i I V The invention also comprises certain specific novel details of construction, as here inafter more fully will be pointed out and claimed, reference being had to the accompanying drawings, in which Figure 1 is a top plan .view, partly broken away, of one form of my invention.

Figure 2 is a side elevation of the same. Figure 3 is an enlarged detail sectional view of the putting surface, taken on the line III-1110f Figure 1.

Figure 4 is an enlargedsectional view of the cup for receiving the ball, and its means of attachment.

Figure 5 is a view similar to Figure 4;, taken on the line V-V of Figure 1, showin I the cup removed and a filler plug inserted to close the opening. v

F i re 6 is a view similar to Figure 2 on a re uced scale, showing means for shifting the putting surface bodily.

Figure 7 is a detail sectional view showing a removable disk adapted to be applied to the covering carpet of the device, whereby to close one of the cup openings therein. Figure 8 is aperspective view of a modified construction.

Figure 9' is a side elevation of the same,

Figure 10 is a top plan view of the same.

Similar numerals of reference denote corresponding parts in the several views.

In the said drawings, referring more paricularly to Figures 1 to 7, the reference 1111- meral 1 denotes a rectangular frame, which may be made of any suitable material, and 2 an inclined frame running from the top of the frame 1 at one end down flush with'the floor at its other end, and being de'tachably.

connected to said frame '1 in any suitable manner. This construction provides an in.-

clined surface. 0n 2 up which a golf ball may be projected onto the .top surface of the frame 1 hereinafter described.

Said surface comprises a top layer of heavy burlap, fibre, steel, metal, or other similar flexible material 3, the same being fixed tothe top edge of the frame around its circumference, and being otherwise supported intermediate its length and breadth by a series of jacks. best seen in Figure 3, each comprising a base 4, a screw member 5 having oppositely pitched screw ends, and an upper movable member 6. The upper end of "the screw member 5 is recessed to receive a turning element, whereby said member 5 may be rotated to raise or lower the .membersfi.v

with respect to the base 4. Extending from the upper members 6 of each of thesejacksis a series of flat steel or other metal strips 7, the same being fastened to the upper edge of the'frame' 1 and the said members 6, and

being disposed as shown in Figure 1, thereby aflording additional support for the cover 3, as readily will be understood. Said cover 3 is apertured at different points to receive a putting cup 8, the latter being of the usual configuration and formed with. a comparatively broad upper flat flange. 9, adapted to engage over the edge of the hole in the cover 3 to afl'orda comparatively firm support for said cup. In order to provide a smooth putting surface, and one resembling a putting green, the frame 1 and the incline 2 are completely covered by a removable carpet 10, which may be green in color to simulate the usual putting green. This carpet is provided with circular apertures 11 correspond ing with the cup-receiving apertures in thecover 3, and adapted to register therewith.

To secure the cup firmly.in position, a flanged ring 12-is inserted into the cup and pressed down upon the edge of the carpet and burlap, as clearly seen in Figure 4. A plurality of cup-receiving apertures is provided in order that the position of the on 8 may be shifted from time to time, as is one on the ordinary putting green. In order to close those holes in the cover 3 which are not in use, I provide metal plugs 13 adapted to fit into the usual holes. said plugs being flanged at 14 to provide a bearing upon the cover 3, as best seen in Figure 5. And in order to close the unused holes in the carpet 10, I provide carpet disks 15 adapted to fit accurately into said holes and to be retained in position by underlying stripsc16'having snap fasteners17 adapted to engage the underside of the carpet 10 to retain said disks in position, as best seen in Figure 7.

In order to provide for a bodily tiltin of the frame 1, I provide at the rear end 0 the same one or more jacks 18 of any suitable construction, whereb jacks and the metal strips 7, aifordin a sur-' face firm enough to support him. y manipulating the screw members 5, the putting surface may be varied as desired to provide an undulatory surface of any particular configuration. And if an inclined putting surface is desired, this may be obtained by manipulating the jacks 18.

To shift the cup, the ring 12 is removed,

I the carpet thrown back,.and the disk 15 of the new hole therein removed, said disk being placed in the former hole aperture." The plug 13 of the new hole in the cover 3 then is removed and placed in the old hole, the

cup itself at the same time being shifted from the old hole to the new hole. The car'- pet then is returned to position with its open hole registering with the cup position. By now inserting the ring 12 into the cup, the shift will be completed.

' In Figures 8, 9 and 10, I have shown a somewhat modified construction wherein a playing surface is provided that may be approached from different angles. This p aying surface is made up of a plurality of sections detachably fastened together, the two sections 19 each being putting surfaces, like those shown in Figure 3, while the three sections 20 are inclines from the floor to said putting surfaces on one side, the incline 21 eing a similar approach from another side, and the sections 23 being so shaped as to form an angled approach, as best seen in Flgure 8. It will be understood that ,the surface of some or all of the sectionsare to be provided with jack members for varying the surface, and that their rear or sides, or both, may be provided with jacks 18 for the bodily shift t ereof, as shown in Figures 1 to 7. Over all of these surfaces will be spread a suitable carpet 24 adapted to extend beyond the sections 20, 21'and 23 onto the floor.

In Figures 2 and 8,1 have shown in dot-v ted lines stop walls, which may be used if the device is on an open floor, in order to prevent the ball from being projected-off the green. e

Having thus fully described my invention, what I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent, is

1. A device of the character described,

comprising a playing surface, means for shifting the angle of said surface bodily, and means for shifting said surface into undulations.

2. A device of the character described,

comprising a frame, a comparatively thick flexible cover over the to surface of the same, and separately adwstable jacks in. said frame for selectively varying the contour of said cover.

3. A device of the character described,

comprising aframe, a comparatively thick,

flexible cover over the top surface of the.

same, separately adjustable jacks in said j frame for selectively varying the contour of said cover, and metallic strips extending from the upper members of said jacks to the frame top and beneath said cover.

4. A device of the character described, comprising a frame, a comparatively thick cover over the surface of the same, means for shifting said cover into undulations, a cup disposed in an aperture in said cover, and a flexible playing surface removably disposed over said cover and apertured to register with said cup.

5. A device of the character described,

comprising a frame, a comparatively thick cover over the surface of the same, a cup disposed in an aperture in said cover, a flexible playing surface removably disposed over said cover and apertured to register with said cup, and means for detachably retaining said cup and playingsurface in po-' sition in said cover.

6. A device of the character described,

comprising avframe, a comparatively thick cover over the surface of the same, a cup disposed in an aperture in said cover, a flexible playing surface removably disposed over said cover and apertured to register with said cup, and a flanged ring removably inserted into said cup for detachably retaining said cup and playing surface in position ,in said cover.

7. A device of the character described, comprising a frame, a comparatively thick cover over the surface of the same and having a plurality of aperturestherein, a cup adapted to be disposed removably in any one ertured to correspond with the apertures 1n said cover, and means for closing the unoccupied apertures 111 said cover and playing surface. f

, 9. A device of the character described,

comprising a frame, a comparatiyely thick cover over the surface of the same provided with a plurality of apertures, a cup'adapted to be disposed rem'ovably in any one of said apertures, and flanged plugs adapted to be inserted in the unoccupied apertures in said cover.

10. A device of the character described, comprising a frame, a comparatively thick cover over the surface of the same and pro-V Vided with a plurality of apertures, a cup adaptedfto be disposed removably in any one of said apertures, flanged plugs adapted to be inserted in the unoccupied apertures in" said cover, and disks adapted to be inserted 'in the unoccupied apertures in said playing surface.

11. A device oft-he character described,

comprising a frame having a playing surface formed on its top, a plurality-of inclined surfaces connected to" the sides the1 e of, and an inclined surface connectedfto'one Y I corner thereof and merging tvith the other inclined surfaces.

12. A device of the, character described shifting the angle of said surface bodily. I

14. A device of the character described, comprising an undulatory playing surface, 3-

and means for shifting the angle o fjsaid surface bodily.

In testimony whereof, I hereunto 'a'flix my slgnatures an inclined approach thereto, and means for

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2606028 *Dec 14, 1949Aug 5, 1952Zion IrvingDevice for simulating golf putting holes
US2678823 *May 27, 1949May 18, 1954Hugman Robert H HGutter area for indoor putting games
US2794646 *Apr 27, 1955Jun 4, 1957Philip H KnottMiniature golf game apparatus
US3038726 *Jun 5, 1959Jun 12, 1962Arthur J HesidencePractice putting apparatus
US3170694 *Apr 6, 1962Feb 23, 1965Dolce Jerry PaulVariable-surface game table
US3239226 *Feb 6, 1964Mar 8, 1966Matte PaulMiniature curling game with movable surface
US3366387 *Sep 25, 1962Jan 30, 1968Ralph F. KoenerGolf putting game apparatus for utilization by a plurality of players
US3366388 *Oct 21, 1965Jan 30, 1968Carmina G VozzaElectrically operated golf game
US3430964 *Apr 11, 1967Mar 4, 1969Budzinski Sylvester MGolf practice device
US3508756 *Jan 19, 1968Apr 28, 1970Microdot IncVariable surface putting device
US3658343 *Dec 10, 1968Apr 25, 1972Brunswick CorpContourable green with randomly operable contour selection
US3743295 *Jan 3, 1972Jul 3, 1973Flowers TGolf putting green
US3762718 *Mar 9, 1972Oct 2, 1973Culley JGolf putting practice device
US3772841 *Nov 24, 1969Nov 20, 1973Barak AMethod of constructing indoor or patio green and a plug for the golf cup thereof
US3897067 *Jun 13, 1974Jul 29, 1975Smith Alvin HPortable golf course
US4211417 *Aug 21, 1978Jul 8, 1980Glen BrownPractice putting green
US4240637 *Oct 23, 1978Dec 23, 1980Alvan CrossPutting practice apparatus
US4743027 *Apr 2, 1987May 10, 1988Command Automation, Inc.Golf practice putting device
US4875684 *Jan 20, 1988Oct 24, 1989Jacques BenilanOrientable platform, in particular for training in golf
US5031916 *Jun 8, 1990Jul 16, 1991Boswell James WTee and green structures for a golf-type game
US5078394 *Jan 28, 1991Jan 7, 1992Paul KretzGolf putting improvement device
US5201521 *Mar 22, 1991Apr 13, 1993Healy Charles WPutting practice and game apparatus
US5431403 *Feb 9, 1994Jul 11, 1995Pelz; David T.Golf putting practice device with perfect putting surface
US5445381 *Nov 29, 1994Aug 29, 1995Van Ert; FloydAll season putting system
US5505451 *Nov 30, 1994Apr 9, 1996Brayshaw; Robin A.Simulated golf putting green
US5855522 *Nov 10, 1997Jan 5, 1999Bevan; Paul C.Golf putting apparatus with variable surface
US5863256 *May 12, 1997Jan 26, 1999John J. MacLeanPortable putting surface
US6050901 *May 19, 1999Apr 18, 2000Davis; GroverModular and adjustable putting surface
US6062984 *Dec 30, 1998May 16, 2000Ju; Ji-YongGolf putting training apparatus
US6146284 *May 3, 1996Nov 14, 2000Russell; Ian JohnPutting green apparatus
US6179721Mar 22, 1999Jan 30, 2001Paul C. BevanGolf putting apparatus with variable surface
US6679783 *Aug 5, 2002Jan 20, 2004Chung-Ming LinGolf training device
US6942579 *Sep 3, 2003Sep 13, 2005David ChenMulti-function golf training device
US8585509 *Nov 4, 2011Nov 19, 2013Mei-Chu YehPutting green simulator
US8616988 *Jun 14, 2013Dec 31, 2013Sean CoffmanGolf simulation system
US20130116059 *Nov 4, 2011May 9, 2013Mei-Chu YehPutting green simulator
WO2001012275A1 *Jul 27, 2000Feb 22, 2001Robin Michael LongPutting green simulator
WO2012096888A1 *Jan 9, 2012Jul 19, 2012Othili ParkGolf practice mat apparatus
WO2014200559A1 *Nov 20, 2013Dec 18, 2014Coffman SeanGolf simulation system
Classifications
U.S. Classification473/160, 473/185, 14/71.1, 14/69.5
International ClassificationA63B67/02
Cooperative ClassificationA63B2067/025, A63B67/02
European ClassificationA63B67/02