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Publication numberUS1613807 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 11, 1927
Filing dateJul 27, 1923
Priority dateJul 27, 1923
Publication numberUS 1613807 A, US 1613807A, US-A-1613807, US1613807 A, US1613807A
InventorsKrotee Walter E, Rutherford Harry K
Original AssigneeKrotee Walter E, Rutherford Harry K
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Telescopic musket sight
US 1613807 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 11,1921. 7 ,613,807-

' H. K. RUTHERFORD ET AL TELESCOPIC MUSKET SIGHT 2 Sheets-Sheet I Original Filed July 27. 1923 saw a N h RN EN Q l w r b 5 INVENTORS Jan. 11.1927. 613,801

- H. K. RUTHERFORD ET AL TELESCOPIC MUSKBT SIGHT 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTORS Teresaintermi e Patented Jan. 11, 1927.

UNITED STATES HARRY K. RUTHERFORD, THE UNITED STATES ARMY, AND WALTER E. KROTEE, OF

PHILADELPHIA,

PENNSYLVANIA. I

TELESCOPIC MUSKET SIGHT.

Application filed July 27, 1923, Serial (GRANTED UNDER THE ACT OF The invention described herein may be used by the Government or any of its oflicers or employees in prosecution of work for the Government, or by any other person 1n the United States without payment to us of any royalty thereon in accordance with the act of March 3, 1883.

Our invention relates broadly to improvements in telescopic musket sights and specifically to the means of attaching such sights to small arms and of controlling the settings in elevation and deflection of such sights when so attached.

One object of the present invention is to provide a means whereby a telescope may be removably secured to a caliber .30 Springfield rifle or one of similar construction without requiring any modification to the parts of the rifle. Our method of attachment is such that the telescope will remain rigidly in position on the rifle when put on and will always relocate itself in exactly the same position on the rifle when removed and replaced.

A further object of the invention is to provide an improved form of combined locking and counting device on the elevation and the deflection controlling mechanisms of the telescope, to perform the two functions of preventing accidental movement of these mechanisms and assisting the user in meas' uring the amount of their movement when" operated.

A further object of the invention is to provide means for absorbing the force of an accidental blow on the telescope and for preventing it from being transmitted to the support attaching the telescope to the rifle, where it might otherwise injuriously afiect the adjustment of the sight to the rifle.

lVith these ends in view, the invention resides in the novel arrangement and combination of parts and in the details of construction hereinafter described and claimed, it being understood that changes in the precise embodiment of the invention herein disclosed may be made within the scope of what is claimed, without departing from the spirit of the invention.

Practical embodiments of the invention are disclosed in the accompanying drawings wherein:

F igure 1 shows a side view of the main No. 654,138. Renewed October 7, 1925.

MARCH 3, 1883; 22 STAT. L. 625.)

features of the invention, with a telescope in place as it would appear when assembled to a caliber .30 Springfield rifle.

Figure 2 is a detail sectional view taken on the line 22 of Fig. 3.

Figure 3 shows a plan View, partially cross sectioned, of the bracket with telescope removed.

Figure 4 shows a cross section on the line 4-4 of Fig. 1;

Figure 5 shows an enlarged cross section on the line 55 of Fig. 3.

As indicated in Figure 1, the telescope 1 is provided with two supporting rings rigidly attached thereto, viz, a forward one 2 and a rear one 3. These rings are, in turn, supported by a metal bar 4 in a manner to be described later, which bar is adapted to clamping on the rifle.

As indicated in Figure 1, this member consists of a metal bar, of varying cross sectional area, removably secured at its for ward end to the rear sight fixed base on a rifle and extending back from this support to a point at the rear of the bridge of the receiver, where it terminates in a downwardly extending lug adapted to fit loosely into the corresponding recess in the rifle at this point. This bar is so shaped and so dimensioned as to be as rigid as practicable for the weight of material included in it, since, as will appear later, much of the value of the invention depends on the rigidity of this member.

As indicated in Figure 1, the bar 4 is so formed at its forward end that itwillfit into the recess provided on the rifle for the rear sight, when the'said rear sight has been removed. In the particular case of the caliber .30 Springfield rifle, this recess has the shape indicated in Figures 1 and'2, the principal features of this recess being the front undercut lug 5, the rear undercut lug 6 and the pivot pin 7 all rigidly secured to the rifle. The bar 4 is, therefore, so formed at its forward end that itwill engage with the lugs 5 and 6 and the pivot 7. Clamping devices 8 and 9 are provided by means of which the bar 4 may be securely fastened to the rifle.

The clamping device 8 is designed to lock the bar 4 to the pivot 7 and thus to prevent any possible movement of the telescope along the axis of the rifle. The clamping device 9, in conjunction with the lug 10, is designed to secure the bar 4 against any lateral rotation around the pivot 7 and the combination of these two clamping devices, together with the engagement of the bar 4 with the lugs 5 and 6 on the rifle, are designed to prevent any variation in the elevation of axis of the sight with respect to that of the rifle either when firing or when this; sight is removed and replaced on the r1 e.

In caliber .30 Springfield rifles as constructed at present, the lugs 5 and 6 are quite accurately machined and the undercut portions ofl'er true surfaces from which to locate the bar 4. For this reason, the underside of the bar 4 is provided with a strong leaf spring 11, the function of which is to force the corresponding parts of the bar 4 into engagement with the lugs 5 and 6 and thus insure that it always has the correct position relative to the rifle before clamping. The setting up of the clamps insures that this position is maintained while firing.

As previously stated, the lug 16 at the rear end of the bar 4, preferably fits rather loosely in the corresponding recess at the rear of the bridge of the receiver. The lug 16 has ordinarily little or nothing to do with the positioning of the bar 4 on the rifle, but is provided more as a safety feature to prevent injury to the clamping mechanism at the front end of the bar 4 in case of an accidental blow on the rear end of the telescope. \Ve do not, however, wish to limit ourselves to a construction in which the lug 16 always fits loosely in its recess, since by properly proportioning this lug to fit the rifle, it may be made to increase the strength of the attachment between the bar 4 and the rifle. Furthermore, we may, under certain conditions, find it advisable to cause the rear end of the bar 4 to rest on the top of the bridge of the receiver, as for example by the use of the downward extending lug 36 in Figure 1, or an equivalent construction. It will be evident, however, that whether the lug 16 fits snugly or loosely in its recess at the rear of the bridge of the receiver, any blow on the rear end of the telescope, whether from the .side or from above, will be transmitted by the lug 16 directly to the rifle and so prevented from injuring the clamping mechanisms at the front end of the bar 4 and the other more or less vulnerable parts contiguous thereto.

We wish to make it clear that, while we prefer to use both the clamps 8 and 9 for positioning the bar 4 on the rifle, and to leave the lug 16, and the lug, 36, if used, to fit rather loosely, so as to be interchangeable on different rifles, we are aware that clamp 9 and lug 10 may be dispensed with and satisfactory results may be obtained, provided thelug 16 is fitted to the individual rifle with which the invention is to be used.

We are also aware that the lug 16 instead of engaging with the recess at the rear end of the bridge of the receiver, may be constructed to engage with the recess at the front end of the bridge provided for the insertion of the cartridge clip, but we prefer to locate the lug 16 in the position shown.

As shown in Figure 2, the pivot clamp consists of a split ring member 12, made slightly conical on the outside and fitted into a corresponding conical seat in the bar 4 so that when forced in by the rotationof the threaded cap 13 under the action of the clamping lever 8, the member 12 will clamp the bar 4 strongly to the pivot pin 7. This clamping device, therefore, is capable of al ways making'a firm connection to the pivot pin, even if these pins should vary somewhat in size on different rifles.

As' indicated in Figure 2, the cap 13 is composed of the threaded body and of an upward extension on which the clamping lever 8 is fitted. This upward extension is formed with a plurality of flat lateral faces as shown and the opening in the lever 8 is correspondingly formed, so that when the securing nut shown at the top of the member 13 is removed, the lever 8 may be adjusted to different positions as may be most convenient, and to allow for wear in the various parts of the clamping mechanism.

In Figure 3 it will be seen that the clamping lever 9 is arranged to rotate a locking screw 14 which is threaded into the bar 4. Loosely mounted on the screw 14 so as to rotate freely is a clamping member 15. A flange 37 is so arranged on the screw 14 that when the latter is tightened, member 15 will be forced by this flange in toward the lug 10, thus providing a means of effec tively clamping the sides of the lug 6 be tween the lug 10 and the member 15. The lug 10, being integral with the bar 4, gives an invariable surface which we use as above described for locating the sight on the rifle.

'As indicated in Figure 3, the method of securing the clamping lever 9 to the screw 14 is the same as shown in Figure 2 for the clamping lever 8 and provides the same adjustable feature.

To place the sight on the rifle, the telescope with the bar 4 attached to it is first set at right angles to the axis of the piece, with the rear end of the telescope to the right, in such position that the ring member 12 may be placed over the pivot 7. The sight is then rotated around the pivot 7 as an axis to the position on the rifle shown in Figure 1, causing the lugs on the bar 4 to come into engagement with the corresponding lugs 5- and 6 0n the rifle, and the spring 11 to ride up upon the rifle, become compressed and force the bar 4 into firm we: mgneae vwtiilL tri um? at": MA.

engagement with the lugs and 6. At the the rear of the bridge of the rifle. The arrangement and dimensions of the parts are such that, when the clamps are loose, it is possible to bring the lug 16 up over the bridge of the rifle and into its recess, with no bending of the bar 4. lVhen the clamps 8 and 9 have been tightened, all the weight of the telescope is carried by the forward end of the bar 4.

The present invention is designed to provide for a windage correction or adjustment to the telescope by a rotation of the whole telescope around the front support 2, which, for this purpose, is pivoted in the bar 4 as shown in Figure 2. A windage knob'17 and attached screw are provided near the rear end of bar 4, by means of which the telescope is given the slight lateral movement required.

In a device of this nature it is essential that any looseness in joints or lost motion which would affect the accuracy of the sighting, be eliminated. For this reason, the novel construction indicated in detail in Figure 4 is used for the connection between the telescope supports, 2 and 3 respectively, and the bar 4. As illustrated by Figure 4, this construction consists in providing a flat bearing shoulder 18 between the telescope support and the bar 4 to prevent any tilting of the telescope. A threaded extension 19 preferably made integral with the telescope support, 2 and 3, passes through the bar 4 and has at its lower end a disk spring 21 and a nut assembled as shown. hen the nut 20 is tightened so as to compress the spring 21, all vertical lost motion will be taken out of the mechanism. It is, of course, intended that there shall be sufficient freedom of movement in the mechanism to permit it to be operated conveniently,

The method provided for making the windage correction is as shown in Figure 4. On one side of the recess for the passage of the threaded extension 19 through the bar 4, is drilled an opening into which the windage screw 34 is threaded. This screw bears against a flattened portion of the extension 19 as shown. On the side of the extension 19 opposite to the screw 34 is a recess in the bar 4 into which is inserted the coil spring 35, which keeps the member 19 always in contact with the end of the screw 34. The combined action of screw 34 and spring 35 when the former is moved causes the rear support 3 of the telescope to be laterally displaced, thus giving the desired windage correction to the telescope. The use of the spring 35 in the manner indicated serves to eliminate all lost motion from the windage mechanism.

The combined locking and counting dein Figure 5. In this view, 24 indicates a portion of the serrated edge of the knob. The spacing of the serrations is such that a movement of one tooth corresponds to a movement of one minute or a multiple of, one minute of are on the part of the tele-" scope. Thus by counting the number of teeth or serrations through which the knob is rotated, the amount of motion given to the telescope by such rotation may be found in terms of minutes of arc, and may then be easily translated into inches of corresponding movement on the target.

The housing 25 provided for the locking device, is made integral with an immovable part of the sight. This housing has screwed into it a member 26, one end of which is threaded, the other end being knurled for easy grasping by the fingers. This member 26 is recessed at the threaded end, to house the plunger 27 and spring 28 as'shown. The plunger 27 is provided at one end with a knife edge 29 to engage with the serrations 011 the rim of the knob and at the other with a tail piece 30 of reduced diameter so as to fit loosely inside the spring 28. This tail piece 30 is of such length as to make contact with the bottom of the recess in the member 26 when the latter is screwed sufficiently far into the housing 25. A flattened portion is provided on the plunger 27 and a pin 32 inserted to engage with this flattened portion and prevent the rotation of the plunger. A second pin 33 is provided, as indicated, to limit the amount of the withdrawl of the screw 26.

The operation of the device is as follows: In its unlocked position as shown in Figure 5, it is evident that when the knob 24 is rotated, the plunger 27 will be pushed back against the spring until one tooth on the knob has been passed, when the plunger will again be forced out by the spring to the position shown, and so on successively for each tooth. The noise made by the knife edge in passing over the teeth gives a ready means of counting the number of minutes or other unit through which the knob has been turned.

By screwing the member 26 into the housing 25, it is evident that contact will eventually be made between the bottom of the re cess in member 26 and the end of the tail piece 30 on the plunger, thus preventing any motion of the latter and eifectually looking the knob 24 against rotation. It will remain locked until the member 26 is purpose ly released.

While we have, in the above description and accompanying drawings, shown the preferred embodiment of .our invention, it will be evident to those skilled in the art that numerous changes in details of construction may be made without departing from the spirit of the invention as herein disclosed.

What We claim is:

1. The combination with a rifle of a telescope mount comprising two spaced telescope receiving standards, a rigid bar connecting said standards, means at one end of said bar for detachably securing said bar to said rifle, and means for automatically forcing the bar to proper position with relation to the rifle when the securing means is in rifle engaging position.

2. The combination with a rifle having a fixed portion consisting in part of one or more undercut lugs and a pivot pin in proximity to said lugs, of a rigid bar adapted at one end to engage with said lugs and said pivot pin, said bar being provided at said end with means for detachably securing it to said pivot pin, the other end of said bar being fitted to make contact with said rifle, said bar being provided with supports for a telescope.

3. The combination with a rifle having a fixed portion consisting in part of one or more undercut lugs and a pivot pin in proximity to said lugs, of a rigid bar, adapted at one end to engage with said lugs and said pivot pin, with means carried by the bar for detachably securing it to said pivot pin and to one or more of said lugs, said bar being provided with supports for a telescope.

4:. The combination with a rifle having a fixed portion consisting in part of one or more undercut lugs and a pivot pin in proximity to said lugs of a rigid bar adapted at one end to engage with said lugs and said pivot pin, said bar being provided at said end with means for detachably securing it to said pivot pin, the other end of said bar being fitted to make contact with said rifle, said bar being provided with supports for a telescope and with means for forcing it into close contact with the undercut surface of said undercut lug or lugs.

5. The combinatien with a rifle having a fixed portion consisting in part of one or more undercut lugs and a pivot pin in proximity to said lugs of a rigid bar, adapted at one end to engage with said lugs and said pivot pin, said bar being provided at said end with means for detachably securing it to said pivot pin and to one or more of said lugs, said bar being provided with supports for a telescope and with means for forcing it into close contact with the undercut surface of said undercut lug or lugs.

6. The combination of a telescope mounting having a tapered circular recess formed therein; an annular member tapered on the outside and split parallel to its axis, adapted to fit loosely in said recess; a threaded member adapted to contact with said annular member to force the latter into the said recess, said threaded member being adapted to engage with a corresponding threaded portion of the said mounting, and means for rotating said threaded member.

7. A telescopic musket sight adapted for use with a fire arm having a portion consisting of an undercut lug and a pivot pin, embodying a bar mounted on the pivot pin, a fixed lug on the bar for engaging one side of the under cut lug, a screw rotatable in the other side of the bar and a clamping member carried by the screw for engaging the corresponding side of the undercut lug.

8. The combination with a rifle'of a telescope mount comprising two spaced telescope receiving standards and a rigid bar connecting said standards, said standards having shouldered extensions adapted to pass through correspondingly shouldered openings in said bar, said extensions being threaded at their free ends and provided with means consisting of spring washers ind nuts for securing said standards to said xar.

9. The combination with a rifle of a tele scope mount comprising two spaced telescope receiving standards and a rigid bar connecting said standards, said standards having shouldered extensions adapted to pass through correspondinglyg' shouldered openings in said bar, said extensions being threaded at their free ends and provided with means consisting of spring washers and nuts for securing said standards to said bar, the first of the said extensions being so attached to said bar as to act as a pivot for the rotation of the telescope, the second of the said extensions being so attached to said bar as to permit a slightrotation of the telescope around said pivot, and means for accomplishing the said rotation, consisting of a screw, threading into the said bar and contacting with one side of the said second extension and an opposing spring contacting with the other side of said second extension.

10. The combination with a rifle of a telescope having adjustable means for positioning its line of collimation with respect to the axis of the rifle, said means consisting in part of member having a toothed periphery, and a spring actuated plunger, said plunger having at one end a knife edge adapted to mesh with the teeth of the said toothed member, said plunger with its said operating spring being adapted to fit loosely in a recess in an adjustable threaded member, said threaded member being arranged to screw in or out of a similarly threaded fixed member, means being provided in said fixed member to prevent the rotation of the said plunger, the depth of the recess in the said adjustable threaded member being such that when it is screwed sufliciently far into the said threaded fixed member, said plunger will make contact with the bottom of said recess, locking said plunger against disengagement from the serrations of said toothed member, the dimensions of the parts also being such that, when said adjustable threaded member is unscrewed from the fixed threaded member, the said toothed member will be unlocked and rotatable.

11. A telescopic musket sight adapted for use with a fire arm having a portion consisting of one or more under-cut lugs and a pivot pin in proximity to said lugs, embodying a bar, supports for a telescope carried by the bar, means carried bythe bar for receiving the pivot pin and binding the bar thereto, and means on the bar for engaging the under-cut lugs.

12. A telescopic musket sight adapted for use with a fire arm having a portion consisting in part 0]": one or more under-cut lugs and a pivot pin in proximity to said lugs;

embodying a bar, supports for a telescope carried by the bar, the bar formed for engagement with the lugs, means for clamping the bar to the pivot pin and means for forcing the bar into engagement with the lugs.

13. A telescopic musket sight, embodying spaced telescope receiving standards, a bar connecting the standards, and means carried by the bar and engaging a standard for oscillating the telescope about an axis of the other standard.

14. A telescopic musket sight, embodying spaced telescope receiving standards, a bar 1 connecting the standards, one of said standards being oscillatable about a vertical axis and the other movable transversely of the bar, whereby corrections in the setting of the telescopic sight maybe made.

HARRY K. RUTHERFORD. WALTER E. KROTEE.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2545419 *Jun 15, 1946Mar 13, 1951Francis P ClearyTelescope gun sight mounting
US2767473 *Sep 13, 1954Oct 23, 1956Craven Edgar ADetachable scope mount for guns
US3045351 *Jul 21, 1959Jul 24, 1962Dayton Theodore SMount for telescope sights
US5657546 *Aug 14, 1995Aug 19, 1997The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The NavySpotting round bore alignment mechanism for rocket launcher
US6061945 *Feb 5, 1998May 16, 2000Litton Systems, Inc.Optical clamping system
US6295170Oct 30, 1996Sep 25, 2001Litton Systems, Inc.Alignment element for multiple channel sight and method
US6591538Sep 20, 2001Jul 15, 2003Christopher A. HollerScope mount for firearms having projectiles traveling at subsonic speed and associated methods
US6708439 *Feb 13, 2003Mar 23, 2004Elmer LaitalaAdjustable mount for rifle sight
Classifications
U.S. Classification42/126
International ClassificationF41G1/00, F41G1/387
Cooperative ClassificationF41G11/005
European ClassificationF41G11/00B8