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Publication numberUS1616419 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 1, 1927
Filing dateApr 3, 1925
Priority dateApr 3, 1925
Publication numberUS 1616419 A, US 1616419A, US-A-1616419, US1616419 A, US1616419A
InventorsGemmel Wilson Wylie
Original AssigneeEverlasting Valve Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Automatic shut-off device for gas in case of fire
US 1616419 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

' Feb; 1, 1927;

AUTOMATIC SHUT- Filed Avril 5, 1925 xn-roxPn/fr Patented Feb. 1, 1927.

eena wrrirn GEMMEL WILSON, or ELIZABETH, new JEnsnY, assrelvon To EvEaLAsrrrne VALVE COMPANY, or JERSEY CITY, JERSEY.

NEW JERSEY, A CORPORATION OF NEW AUTOMATIC SHUT-err nnvrcnron eas'nv case or FIRE.

' Application filed April s, 1925. serial No. 20,454.

This invention relates toan automatic shut-off device for gas in case of fire.

The object of the invention is to produce a simple and durable device for installation in gas conduit; whereby, in case of fire, flow of gas in the conduit will be automatically prevented. This invention is applicable to gas mains entrant into buildings; and to gas pipesavitlnn buildings for illuminating and power purposes and for ga ranges, heaters and other purposes. By automatically sealing a gas conduit in case of tire, more or less serious gas explosions are prevented and fire riskslreduced.

In theaccompanying drawing forming a part her-eofzand illustrating two difierent forms of my invention:

1 is a vertical, central,sectional View of one form of my new automatic gas shutor"? device shown as a union between gas pipe sections.

Fig.2 is a vertical, central, sectional View of another form of said device coupling gas pipe. sections. i i

'3 is a horizontalsection at line ofFig.1.

/ Referririg to the illustrated forms of the invention and first to thatform shown in Figs. 1 and 3, my new device consists of a chambered union having a flat top wall, 2, alinedly opposed, spaced apart neck conduits 3 and a downwardly extending bottom lwhich forms a pocket below the level. of the necks 3. Each neck 3 is in threaded connection through a connecting sleeve 1) with a gas pipe section (1,. The upper wall of the device is shown in Fig. 1 provided with a plurality of vertical, threaded openings 5. From the top and side walls of the union a transverse web 6 extends downwardly below the level of the necks 3 and part way to the bottom of the pocket formed by the downward extension of the bottom wall 4. 1

Normally the gas-way is through one conduit neck 3 towards a .side wall of the web 6 and downwardly past the underedge of the web and thence upwardly to the other side of the web and out through the other gas conduit neck 3.

Into each threaded opening at 5 there is threaded a vertical fusible metal holder 7 in the form of an inverted cup and provided at itsbottonropcningor mouth with inwardly progecting lugs a: which serve to protect the packing of fusible metal 8 in each of the holders.

' The fusible metal is-preforably in shredded form and packed solidlyin the holders wherein it will, remain in the absence of heat sutlicient to melt it for a long period, practically during the life of the device. Each to and spaced apart from the gasavay. and

open ends of the holders being elevated relatively to the interior walls of the gas necks sufficiently to permit unobstructed flow of gas from one pipe section to; another through the union solong as the fusible metal remains unmelted.

In caseof fire sutlicient to heat the holder 1 7' and the masses of fusible metal 8 in the holders to a temperature sufficient to melt the fusible'metal, it flows downwardly when melted into the pocket formed by-the clownwardly extending bottom wall 4: and sub merges, the under end portion of-the transverse web 6 in molded, fusible metal 8. Thus,-.the gas-way through the device is automatically sealed or dammed and flow of gas from one pipe section toanother through the device or union is absolutely prevented. The fused metal will naturally-solidify on cooling and usually after a fire the device will not be removed until after the metal has cooled and solidified.

In addition to the above stated advan tage of automatically sealing the gas-way of the device against flow of gas during a fire, another important advantage is that the device when removed may be returned to a manufacturer to be freed of the seal-forming metal 8 and for reloading of the fusible metal holders 7.-

While a plurality of holders 7 is indicated in Fig. 1, only one is essential together with its charge 8 of-fusible metal. However, I show in Fig. 2 another form of the device in which there is only one holder 7 and one charge 8 of fusible metal. The form of the device or coupling shown in Fig. 2 is identical in principle with that illustrated in Figs. 1 and 8, but is d'lferently constructed.

chambered portion of the device, the under and l", each having a gas conduit neck at its 7 and' electric upper portion in threaded connection at 5 with a gas pipe secllon a, the under ends of the two heads 4: and 4 are each in-threaded sleeve is wound with the electric resistance coil 10, one terminal of which is indicated by 11 and the other by 12. If asuitable :electric current is passed through a resistance coillO, the temperature of the sleeve and of the holder which is preferably of brass may be raised suiiiciently to melt the fusible metal 8 and thereby permit theauto- "matic sealing of the gas-way from any desired distance on place.

What I claim is:

1. As a new article of manufacture, a gas conduit memberformed with a gas-Way and 'a removable chambered holder closed at its upper end and having anopen, under end V in jointed connection with walls-of an openill) ing in the upper portion of theconduit member, said holder containing a mass of fusible metal exposed to and spaced apart from and above the gaswvay; the gas-way being formed to receive the fusible metal when melted and thereby seal the gas-way agai-nst fiow of gas through the gas-way.

2. As a new article of manufacture, a gas conduit member formed with a gas-way and a removable chambered holderfcontaining a mass of fusible metal exposed to and spaced apart from and above the gas-way; the gas-,

Way being formed to receive the fusible metal when melted and thereby seal the gas way against flow of gas through thev gasway; the under end of'the holder being. open and the holder being provided at its under end portion with inwardly projecting means for retaining within it the fusible metal until melted.

8. The combination with a gas conduit member formed with a gas-way and a chambered holder containing a mass of fusible metal exposed to and spaced apart from and above the gas-way; the gas-way being 7 formed to receive the fusible metal when melted and thereby seal the gas-way against flow of gas through the gasnvay; of a heat resisting electric resistance coil support and said coil for raising, at the will of an operator the temperature of said coil to a degree sufficient to melt the fusible metal, the coil support being mounted on said holder and the coil surrounding the support and the support surrounding the holder.

4. The combination with a gas conduit member formed with a gas-way and a chammetal exposed to and spaced apart from and above the gas-way; the gas-way being formed to receive the fusible metal when melted andthereby seal the gas-Way against flow ofgas through the gas-way; a heat resisting electricresistance coil support and said coil for raising, at the will of an operator, the temperature of said coil to a degree sufficient to melt the fusible metal, the coil support being mounted on said holder and the 'coilsurroundingthe support and the support surrounding the holder.

iigned at Jersey City, State .of New Jersey, this th day of March A. D. 1925. WYLIE GEMMEL- WILSON.

,7 bered holder containing amass of fusible,

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Classifications
U.S. Classification137/74, 137/251.1
International ClassificationF17D5/00
Cooperative ClassificationF17D5/005
European ClassificationF17D5/00G