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Publication numberUS1618368 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 22, 1927
Filing dateNov 12, 1925
Priority dateNov 12, 1925
Publication numberUS 1618368 A, US 1618368A, US-A-1618368, US1618368 A, US1618368A
InventorsDietle Thomas S
Original AssigneeDietle Thomas S
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Casing ripper
US 1618368 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

. Feb.v 22,1927. '1,618,368

. T. S. DIETLE CASING RIPPER Filed Nov. 12. 1925 '35 Hmm/SEM (W6. (21j/www3;

Patented Feu 22, 1927.

Pa'iizia'i OFFICE.

'monks s. nmrnnor 'rAWHUsxA, OKLAHOMA.

casino. Myrna.'

Application -ledloveiuber/l, 1925. Serial No. 68,637.

4This invention relates tothe mechanism for ripping or cutting the casing of an oil well or similar casing at a point adiaient c ,A the couplings ofthe sections ofsaid casing so that the sections may be removed as desired. There lare provided two knives which are normally retained in .inoperative posi-V tion within a cylindrical member so that the ripper maybe lowered to any desired depth Uponraising the ripper.

within the casing. the knives are released from a detent and are forced outwardly by springs to a posi.

tion in which they project beyond the contour of the cylindrical member. By driving the'r'ipper with common tools and jars, the .upper end of the'casing sertionv will be cut on opposite sides and a cutof only a few inches is necessary to weaken the easing sufliciently so that it may be removed from the couplin At .any time free upward movement o theripper ispermitted.

In the drawings, Fig. 1 is a`- perspective view of the casingripper;

Fig. 2 1s a side view with the removable part of the holding member removed toshow themounting of the knives which are illustrated as in operative position;

Fig. 3- is a side elevation at right angles to Fig. 1, with a part broken away and show- ,ing thetoolwithin, 'a portion of a casing beingindicated in dotted lines;

Fig. 4'is a view similar to Fig. 2, but showing the knives detained -in vtheir inner inoperative position;

Fig. 5 is a section on line 5-5 of Fig. 2;

` and Fig. 6 is a section on line 6-6 of Fig. 9..A

Thecasing ripper may be provided with a portion 1 of an old or suitable .character which permits attachment in the usual man- .fner of means for raising and lowering the `tool. The body portion ofthe ripper is IIfconiposed of a removable part 2 which is ,fastened to portion, 3 by means of pins'4 carried by the member 2 and fitting in corresponding sockets in the body member and by a pin lor bolt 5 or similar fastening which asses through the member 2 into the meiller 3. The members 2 and 3 whenjoined are substantially cylindrical in form and of a size to fit easily within a casing A, two sections of wl ich connected by a coupling B, are indicated in dotted lines -in Fig. 3.

Two knives 6 having 4cutting edges 7 and rounded opposite ends 8 which fit in cut-outs movement.

13 which is held in position by the same pin or bolt 5 which fastens the member 2 to the body member 3. These pins are of such length that when the knives are in inoperative position as shown in Fig. 4, the inner ends of the pin will iustv contact. The springs 11 tend to force the knives outwardly to the Fig. 2 position but they are normally restrained by the following mechanism.

A member 14 is slidably guided by a guide member 15 forming part of the member 3 and has at its lower ends a cross piece terminating in short upward ears 16. Each knife member 6 has a notch 17- on its inner side into which the ears 16 fit'snugly when the parts are in the Fig. 4 position and thereby hold the knives against outward Pivoted to the slide member 14 by a pivot 18 is a rod 19 which extends upwardly and outwardly through a passage 20 cut through the member 2.

With the knives in inoperative position as shown in Fig. 4, the casing-ripper is lowered into the casing to any desired point.. Vhen it lhas reached the lowest casing element it is desired to cnt,` the casing ripper is then pulled up slightly.- Just after the parts paf-s the-position shown in Fig. 3 on the upward movement of the casing ripper, the outer end of the rod 19 comes against the lower cnil of the casing sections vA at the points u'. Further upward movement of the casing ripper thereafter results in a downward movement of therod 19 and a corresponding downward movement relative to the body of the ripper of the sliding member 14 which will move the ears 16 out of the notches 17 in the knives, thereby releasing the saine and permittin them to be moved to the Fig. 2 p'osition y the springs 11. When the parts have reached this position, the member 19 drops to such a point that its upper end no longer engages the end of the casing and 'therefore the casing ripper may be raised ifv pass above the upper end of the other casing member A after which the Casing ripper is raised and lowered rapidly a few times, the knives engaging the casing section at the point y, andcutting this section on opposite sides. As soon as this section has been sutii-l ciently cut the casing ripper may be raised to the upper end of the next section and; the operation repeated if desired. AIt is obvious that the knives themselves` form no obstructions to theupward movement since their engagement with the sides of the casing at this time will merely cam the knives inwardly to an extent suiiicient to permit such upward movement.

It is found that by cutting the casing on opposite sides for a short distance, probably but little more than the extent ot the screw threads with which the casing engages the coupling B, the casing will be weakened suiicicntly to spring in so that the sections may be removed. It the old type ot single knife ripper is employed, it has been found necessary to cut three or i'our feet of casing to attain the same result. This action weakens the pipe to such an extent that a socket cannot be run over the joint left in the hole if it is desired to fish out t-he lower joint while with the casing ripper of the present invention such a. procedure Vmay be employed it' desired. lt is also to be. noted that this casing ripper may be lowered to the extreme depth required and successive joints cut during the upward movement at the points desired. without removing the tool for resetting. v

It is obvious that many detailed .changes may be made in the precise embodiment of the device without in any way departing from the spirit of the invention which is to be regarded as limited only by the scope of the appended claims.

I claim:

l. A ripper for (-asings `formed of a pluralit y of sections connected by couplings, said ripper comprising a member adapted to bc lowered in the casing, one side of said member being removable, cutouts in the body portion ot said member, knives pivotcd at their upper ends in said cutouts, the lower ends of which are movable to a position beyond the contines of said member when released, and

means constantly tending to move said knives outwardly.

2. AV ripper for casings formed of a p1urality of sections connected by couplings, said ripper comprising a member adapted to be lowered in the casing, one side of said member being removable, cutouts in the body portion of said member, knives pivoted at their upper ends in said cutouts, the lower ends of which are movable to a position beyond the `contines of said member when released, means Aconstantly tending to move said knivesoutwardly, and means lying between said knives and normally rest-raining them against such movement.

3. A ripper for casings formed of a plurality of sections connected by couplings, said ripper comprising a member adapted to be lowered in the casing, one side of said member being removable, cutouts in the body portion of said member, knives pivoted at their upper ends in said cutouts, the lower ends ofwhich are movable to a position beyond the confines of said member when released, means constantly tending to move said knives outwardly, means normally restraining them against such movement, and means for releasinof the restraining means by engagement with the endof a section of the casing upon upward movement'cf the member in the casing. y

4. A ripper for casings formed of a plurality of sections connected by couplings, said ripper comprising a member adapted to be lowered in the casing and having slots in the sides thereof, knives pivoted within said member and having their cutting edges movable outward through the slots, means constantly tending to.move the knives to operative position, means lying between said knives and restraining said movement, and means positively operated by the upward movement of the member within the casing to release said restraining means, the member heilig subsequently freely lnovable upward but operating to cut the upper end ot' a section of casing byA downward movement.v

In testimony whereof, I have hereunto subscribed my name.

THOMAS S.' DIETLF.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2466991 *Jun 6, 1945Apr 12, 1949Kammerer Archer WRotary drill bit
US2660240 *Mar 22, 1950Nov 24, 1953Maurycy RinglerApparatus for cutting of rinsing pipes
US2748909 *Mar 20, 1950Jun 5, 1956Mcgraw Electric CoGround anchor
US3496587 *Aug 14, 1967Feb 24, 1970Pullman IncDrill mechanism for sponge iron reactors and the like
US4720211 *Aug 4, 1986Jan 19, 1988British Gas CorporationApparatus for replacing mains
US4738565 *Aug 4, 1986Apr 19, 1988British Gas CorporationMethod of replacing mains
US5544977 *Jun 24, 1994Aug 13, 1996Lone Star Gas CompanyPolymeric pipe splitter, replacement tool and method
US6305880Jul 9, 1999Oct 23, 2001Wrb Company, Inc.Device and method for trenchless replacement of underground pipe
US6524031Aug 24, 2001Feb 25, 2003Wrb Company, Inc.Device and method for trenchless replacement of underground pipe
US6551028Sep 17, 2001Apr 22, 2003Gerald M. RobinsonPipe replacement apparatus
US6585453Jul 19, 2001Jul 1, 2003Gerald M. RobinsonApparatus for trenchless underground pipe replacement
US6702521Jun 3, 2002Mar 9, 2004Gerald M. RobinsonPipe replacement apparatus
US6793442Jan 6, 2003Sep 21, 2004Tric Tools, Inc.Device and method for trenchless replacement of underground pipe
US6799923 *Aug 14, 2002Oct 5, 2004Tric Tools, Inc.Trenchless water pipe replacement device and method
US8540458Jun 14, 2011Sep 24, 2013Roodle, Inc.Center hole ram cable puller
US20030044237 *Aug 14, 2002Mar 6, 2003Carter Robert WilliamsTrenchless water pipe replacement device and method
US20040255746 *Jun 17, 2004Dec 23, 2004Createch Co., Ltd.Shearing device for peripheral wall of tube
US20050042036 *Sep 17, 2004Feb 24, 2005Carter Robert WardDevice and method for trenchless replacement of underground pipe
Classifications
U.S. Classification166/55.2, 175/290
International ClassificationE21B29/00
Cooperative ClassificationE21B29/00
European ClassificationE21B29/00