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Publication numberUS1618769 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 22, 1927
Filing dateApr 29, 1925
Publication numberUS 1618769 A, US 1618769A, US-A-1618769, US1618769 A, US1618769A
InventorsAlfred M. Martin
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Loose-leaf binder
US 1618769 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. 22. 1927. 1,618,769

A. M. MARTIN LOOSE LEAF BINDER Filed April 29, 1925 4 Sheets-Sheet 1 1 V. 4%; W j g I j Feb. 22,1921. A. M MARTIN 5 9 LOOSE LEAF BINDER Filed April 29, 1925 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 1927' A. M. MARTIN LOQSE LEAF BINDER 4 Shets-Shact 5 Filed April 29, 1925 LOOSE LEAF BINDER Filed pril 29. 1925 4 Shaets-Sheet 4 Cal Ill)

cards or sheets then swung back Patented Feb. 22, 1927.

PATENT OFFICE.

ALFRED M. MARTIN, OF CHICAGO, ILLINOIS.

LOOSE-LEAF BINDER.

Application filed April 29, 1925.

The present invention relates to binders having provisions for shifting from one longitudinal position to another therein one or more overlapped sheets without removing such sheet or sheets bodily from all connection with the device.

My Patent No. 1,269,479, of June 11, 1918, discloses a loose-leaf binder in a preferred and modified form according to which perforated sheets or cards on one row of the binder prongs may be swung straight across to the other row of binder prongs, one of the rows of prongs then shifted relative to the other in a longitudinal direction, and the by a straight-across movement to prongs in the first mentioned row, the cards or sheets then occupying a different relative position longi tudinally in the binder.

The device of my said patent exemplifies, so far as I am aware, all of the prior art in hinder devices of a kind adapted to provide, through a shifting operation of parts, for a longitudinal rearrangement of cards or sheets in the binder, and that device has gone into extensive use. According to that device the person desiring to shift cards or sheets, having first opened the book at the desired place, swings over upon the left-hand row of prongs that bunch of overlapped cards or sheets desired to be moved longi- 'tudinally in the device, and thereupon he releases a catch permitting the hinged body members carrying the prongs to swing apart until the free ends of the overlapping prongs at least clear the cards or sheets on the oppo site row of prongs. One of the binder body members is then moved longitudinally on the hingepin relative to the other member, whereupon the body members are moved towa d each other if necessary until the prongs of one member overlap those of the other men'iber, and then the sheets desired to be shifted may be swung straight-across and back upon the ri, Thereupon the body members are shifted longitudinally back into normal position, and then forced toward each other into closed position. Such shifting of cards or sheets is usually done for the purpose of making space at a particular alace for additional cards or sheets or for removing a sheet or sheets and arranging the remaining ones closer together.

In performing the operations mentioned the operator may find that on the left-hand ght-hand binder prongs;

Serial No. 26,619.

side of the binder there is a very considerable number of overlapped sheets or cards, one series being separated from the next by an indexing sheet, and such a condition is encountered when the transferring operation is to be done with respect to cards or sheets near the end of the book. hile shifting the binder parts longitudinally the operator holds with his lefthand this considerable number of cards or sheetssometimes a mass of matter up to several inches in thickness, fairly heavy and, owing to the multiplicity of paper units therein, somewhat difficult to hold. As such binders are handled extensively by women clerks who are billing from the data on the cards and sheets, entering data on them, as by a typewriting operation, inserting new and removing old cards, etc., necessitating frequent shifting of the parts, the operation described is sometimes rather laborious to such clerks and sometimes requires that they devote more time to the manipulation of the book than I have found to be necessary.

The present improvements have for their chief object the simplification of and the reduction of labor involved in the longitudinal repositioning of cards or sheets in a loose-leaf binder device. It is an object to accomplish this according to simple means, and means which leave the other functional elements of the binder free to perform their desired ends, and, in the specific embodiment shown, to provide means for the purpose which are substantially if not wholly concealed and wholly out of the way when not in use, while being ever present for easy use. It is an object also to provide a shifting mechanism for the purpose which is simple, strong and durable, of moderate cost, and one which. is adaptable for use in connection with a large variety of binders. Other objects and advantages will appear hereinafter.

In the drawings Figure 1 is an end view of a loose-leaf binder according to these improvements, the figure showing the book closed, and with the sheet-shifting device held in an out-of-the-way position; Fig. 2 shows the book of Fig. l as it would appear if the covers and certain sheets were first laid apart book-fashion and a certain catch then released to permit the body members to swing apart into what I shall herein refer to as the open position of the binder, this figure also showing by dotted lines a part of the sheet-shifting device moved radi-- ally outward; Fig. 8 is a vertical medial longitudinal section substantially on the line 3-3 of Fig. 1, the prongs of the radiallymovable member being shown in full lines; Fig. 1 is a similar section substantially on the line 4-l of Fig. 2; Figs. 5, 6 and 7 are transverse sections on the lines 5--5, 66, and 7.7 respectively of Fig. 3; Fig. 8 is a transverse sectional view substantially on the line 8+8 of Fig. 4; Fig. 9 is a top view with the binder members in open position and the shifting device drawn outward and shifted in one direction ready to be swung to the right to have sheets or card's trans ferred thereto; Fig. 10 is a fragmentary sectional perspective of a sheet equalizing device including an index sheet; Fig. 11 shows the device of Fig. 10 with the index sheet omitted; and Fig. 12 is a detail showing how the hinge-pin is locked against rctraction.

Loose-leaf binders embodying these improvements will ordinarily take the form of a book having covers attached to hinged body members provided with oppositelydisposed rows of prongs for holding perforated sheets. The details of such fundamental binder elements may vary within wide limits.

In the illustrated hinder the fundan'iental binder parts include a pair of covers 12 secured upon metal parts 12 hinged at 13 upon the respective body members A and B. These longitudinal body members are shown as comprising respectively a sheetsmetal part bent substantially at right angles as transversely viewed and comprising a side leg 14 and a normally bottom leg 15, the bottom legs 15 being hinged together at 16 so as to stand apart slightly when facing each other to accommodate a shifting de vice element between them. In the corner portion of each of these body members A and B is a longitudinally extending finishing and strengthening sheet-metal piece comprising an inner wall 17 and the normally top Wall 18, the latter being shown as being turned at right angles to form the part 1-9 lying alongside and secured to the side frame part 14.

The binder prongs so arranged in a longitudinally-extending row are shown as be ing secured, as by spot-welding, upon plate 21, and the several plates 21, 19 and 14: are to be understood as being strongly riveted or welded together. The binder prongs 22 on binder member B are similarly secured, as by welding or riveting, upon the plate 23 secured to the plate 19, the lat ter being secured to the part 145 on that side of the device.

The cover 12 is usually of fibre board or of leather-covered or cloth-covered cardboard. and is secured as by riveting to the metal fly 12. The metal parts 14 and 15 are also usually covered by the same or similar material designated as 24 and secured by riveting or any other approved means.

The binder prongs and 22 are arc-uate and have the longitudinally-eXt-ending hinge-pin 16 as the axis of their arcuate formation, and they therefore freely enter and emerge from the perforations in the mass of cards or sheets designated as 25 on one side and 26 on the other.

From Fig. 9 it will be noted that the cards or sheets 26, 26, etc, are positioned in such overlapped relation to each other that only the upper card or sheet 26 is completely exposed while the sncueding ones 26", 26., etc, are exposed only to theextent of a relatively narrow strip at the bottom. The amount of such exposure at the bottom could be varied by the operator at will, but as only enough exposure is usually desired for the indexing information, the space of a single line of writing is ordinarily sul'iicient. It will be noted that the apertures 27 in the cards or sheets are so close together as to enable the overlapped cards or sheets to be positioned with the bottom edge of each exposed only the small amount desired, usually about three-eighths of an inch, the distance between centers of adjacent apertures 27 being in such case three-eighths of an inch.

It is equally feasible to expose the top edges of the cards or sheets if so desired, and to have a plurality of cards or sheets in exact registration with each other on certain of the binder prongs, as where one of the stationary units is not sufficient for all of the data under a given index. Such details are wellv understood in the art.

I have thus briefly described the general construction and arrangement of the fundamental binder parts or features shown for present purposes, and in this connection it may be pointed out that such fundamental features are old, and the manner of construction and use thereof well understood; and it should be understood also that a binder in accordance with my present invention may have its fundamental binder elements in any approved construction, arrangement or form.

Referring particularly to the transverse views it will be noted that mounted on the hinge-pin 16 for lateral swinging movements is a longitudinally-extending sheet-metal supporting member shown as having two parallel side parts 30 and 31. These two sides are shown as integral with or joined to each other at the bottom and as being a substantially U-shaped member. It is conveniently in the form of a single unit extending from end to end of the binder. The side parts 30 and 31 are spaced apart only that slight distance required for he loose accorn lit) lit)

modation between them of a plate 32, well shown in side or face View in Figs. 3 and 4, and from these figures it will be clear that the supporting member -31 is hinged at 33, 34, 35, 36 and 37, upon the hinge-pin 16 by means of knuckles interspersed among the hinge knuckles of the two body members through which the hinge-pin 16 also extends.

By referring to Figs. 3 and 4 it will further be noted that the plate 32 has two L-shaped openings cut therein, each having a vertical leg and horizontal leg 41 and that a rivet 42 occupies each of these L- shaped openings. The shape of these rivets 42 is shown for instance in Fig. 6 as including a cylindrical middle part and re duced end extensions projecting through the parts 30 and 31 respectively and riveted over, the central part serving also as a spacing element to maintain the parts 30 and 31 the desired distance apart whereby the plate 32 may move radially outward and inward freely between them. These rivets 42 in the slots 40 respectively determine that the plate 32 shall move outward bodily in a radial direction, and in that direction only to a given extent, namely, until the rivets 42 are contacted by the respective ends of the vertical slots 40, as shown by the dotted lines of Fig. 4. Thereupon the horizontal slots 41 become effective to permit the shiftable member 22 to be moved longitudinally in one direction to the extent determined by the length of the slots 41. According to Figs. 3 and 4 these slots 41 are long enough to permit the member 32 to be moved a distance equal to that of two perforations in the cards. The slots 41 are shown slightly enlarged at 41 and 41" respectively whereby the rivet 42 may become weakly seated at one of these places or the other, with only enough lo alizing hold to permit the operator to bring the longitudinallyshifting member 32 into one desired position or the other through the sense of touch alone. In practice the operator feels the slight resistance to further movement when the rivets 42 come first to the enlargements 41, and if he desires to shift but one space he pauses there and the parts are then accurately in the desired longitudinal arrangement. The invention in this respect is not limited to L-shaped openings for such a plate as 32. I have designed and employed, "for instance, substantially triangular-shaped openings with very satisfactory results.

At the upper edge portion of the longitudinal shifting member 32 there are provided shifting-device prongs 45 arranged in a row, these being preferably also arcuate on the same radius as that of the binder prongs 20 and 22, and these prongs 45 are so positioned on one side of the member 32 that their free ends are directed toward the line of free ends of the binder prongs 22 when the shifting device member 82 has been moved radially outward, Fig. 2 illustrates the arrangement of these prongs and their relationship to the prongs 22 when in a relative position for actual use.

For moving radially outward the shifting device member 32 carrying the row of prongs 45 I provide the finger-piece 46 spotwelded to the plate 32 and extending laterally from the side thereof opposite the prongs 45, the linger-piece 46 being movable in a vertical slot 47 shown by dotted lines in Figs. and 4. The operator maintains a finger hold upon this piece 46 during the longitudinal shifting operation also. A prime feature of advantage in this respect is that the operator conveniently controls all of the movements of the shifting device with his left hand and holds it in a desired position or in various desired positions with his left hand while manipulating cards or sheets to and from the shifting device prongs with his right hand; and the arrangement is such that the operators hands are working only with small and flexibly mounted units, in so simple and easy a manner, and under such control, that the desired end is attained with but a small expenditure of physical and mental eiiort.

From Figs. 3 and 4 it will be noted that between the bases of adjacent prongs 45 the metal is cut away at 48 to provide clearance whereby the binder prongs 22 may overlap, even to the extent of passing beyond, the prongs 45 when the latter are in their dotted line position shown by Fig. 8. This permits the sheets on the shifting-member prongs 45 to be carried deeply into the prongs 22 before they are pushed from. one set of prongs to the other, and so deeply, in fact, that no binding effect upon the sheets due to the end tapering of the prongs will be felt by the operator.

When the parts are in their relative positions shown by Fig. 1, the shifting device member 32 having the prongs 45 is locked against outward movement through the instrun'ientality of a pair of prongs 50 and 51 secured respectively to the plates 21 and 23 of the binder members. The free end portions of these prongs are arcuate on a radius terminating in the axis 16- From Figs. 3 and 4 it will be noted that these prongs 50 and 51 lie side by side when the binder members are in closed position and project through an elongated opening 52 through both members 30 and 31 and also through the intermediate member 32, thus positively locking the intermediate member against outward movement, and at the same time also against longitudinal movement. lVhen the binder is open, however, as in Figs. 2 and 8, the shifting device is entirely free of these locking members 50 and 51, but in this open position they serve as stops to prevent the lllll closing of the binder body members until the shifting device member 32 is lowered away into what is its out-of-the-way position and also its normal initial position for beginning operations. This safety provision comes into play through the fact that when the plate 32 is moved radially outward the opening 52 3 and i) through that plate is moved out of alignment with the opening 52 in the U-shaped supporting member 3l and, should the operator attempt to close the book with the shitting prongs moved outward the book would not close owing to the impingement or the prongs 5t) and 51 on opposite sides of the plate 2-32. Such a protective feature is quite important since otherwise the operator might close the book with the prongs 4L5 of the shifting de vice interiitting with some of the perforations of the cards and thereupon this shiitin device element would be substantially lost among the sheets and it would require some searching first of all to find it; and then it would be necessary to free it from its their position, get it back to neutral position, and then begin operations anew. This safety provision requires that the shifting device shall be moved into its initial position before the book is closed and thus be in position for use at whatever place the book may then be opened.

As to the provision of n'leans next above described for holding the shifting device within a limited amount of lateral movement, referring to the stops and 51, it is pointed out that the use oi this feature is accom panied by certain disadvantages, and that some users will prefer that such a stop as 51 be omitted in order to provide that the shifting device prongs may swing deeply into the sheets such as 26, Fig. 2, to facilitate the transfer oi certain of such sheets to such prongs as a5. The recesses 48 (Fig. 4) in the plate 32 provide that the plate may pass the binder prongs 22, (Fig. 2), and so in order to have this other advantage just mentioned it will. be merely necessary to omit the stop 51.

Vhen such binder members are closed they are invariably locked or held together in a readily releasable way, and various means have been suggested for that purpose. According to the present drawings I provide a pair of inwardly projecting catch members 55 mounted for longitudinal movement on, a springpressed bar (Fig. 8) terminating in a thumbpiece 57, the projecting catches being adapted to pass through holes 58 in the U-shaped member 30-31 and ti e shifting plate 32 (see Figs. 8 andv 4-). 8 show at 59 an opening in the wall 17 for one oi? the catches 55. The aligned openings 58 in the shifting device parts (Figs. 3 and 4:) are large enough longitudinally to permit the necessary longitudinal movement of the lock ing projections respectively and are large enough in general to provide the necessary clearance for the catches whatever the relative position or the shifting device parts may be.

in Fig. 10 I have shown fragmentarily a strip of thin metal 60 doubled upon itself and flanged along an edge at 61 for strength without increasing its thickness. It is provided with perforations .62 adapted to register with the respective perforations 27 in the sheets or cards, and is adapted to occupy space in the binder on the various guongs betii'een two adjacent series oi sheets or cards. 14) shows secured to the metal strip 60 an indexing sheet-68. in Fig. 11, the same structure is shown without the ind e ing sheet. Fig 2 shows one of these strips 60 and the indexing sheet (9% between adjacent series oi cards or sheets in the binder. The strip 6O extends longitudinally from top to bottom. of the binder and is a substantially stiff member, yet quite thin.

The overlapped condition of the cards as shown by Fig. 9 produces a series which has only the thickness of a single card at the top and at the bottom, but which has, intermediate the top and bottom, a gradually increasing thickness reaching that of about a dozen of the cards. Ordinarily between one series of such cards and the next there is an indexing sheet. Since there may be many such series in the book a condition exists in which the middle portion of the book, measuring from top to bottom, is solidly filled with cards while toward vthe top and toward the bottom the cards or sheets are not so solidly filled in, with the result that when the book is opened, simply as a book, and the operator desires to swing cards and sheets in considerable bunches, or in single series, from one set of binder prongs to the other, this sagging down of the sheets at the upper and lower portions of the respective series causes the sheets or cards at these upper and lower portions to bind against the binder prongs, so that ordinarily the operator must shift from side to side only relatively small bunches, and must then take the precaution of putting his hands under the top and bottom portions so as substantially to straighten them out in order to pass them straight across to the other side of the book. By placing one or more substantial y stitl' and rigid straight elements such the bars on the binder posts as shown sheet-supporting means are provided which serve to maintain considerable thicknesses of the (e s or sheets fairly straight so that the transverse paging of the several series may be much more con veni'ently accomplished. As many of such supporting elements as desirable may be used.

Various means have heretofore been suggested for holding the hinge-pin of a looseleaf binder in its proper position, and in Fig. 12 I have illustrated a detail of my improved means in this respect. At each end of the binder members the material for the last knuckle as is split as if to form two knuckles, and the portion 66 of the split material is shortened somewhat so that when all of the material is turned over to form a knuckle the outer portion 66 is free to be turned over somewhat further This last portion as 66 is given such a further turn, as by a pair of pliers, after the hinge-pin has been passed through all of the knuckles of the various hinge members with the hinge-pin terminating at the end of the tions 65 and 65 (Fig. 9), thus reducing the diameter of the sections 66 and 66 and forming obstructions to the longitudinal movement of the hinge-pin. Should it be desired to remove the hinge-pin this part (36 or 66 can be enlarged by inserting a spreading tool or by merely prying it open sufficiently. Features of advantage in this form of construction are that the hinge-like formation is continued to the end of the device, preserving its appearance, that no separate parts are required to be introduced, that the mechanical operations involved are both simple and cheap, and that the result is an unusually strong and secure lock.

A brief and sufficient description of the operation of the shifting device is as fol lows:

The operator opens the binder, book fashion, at a place where a sheet-shifting operation is to be performed, and thereupon pushes against the finger-piece 57 releasing the catches 55 and permitting the binder body members to open, as shown by Fig. 8. By. means of the finger-piece 46 the shifting device member which includes the prongs a5 is lifted vertically into its dotted line position in Fig. 2. Thereupon the shifting device as a whole is swung to the right-with ,its prongs overlapping the prongs 22. The

operatoi"s right hand is then placed under certain sheets to be shifted longitudinally and these sheets are swung over upon the prongs 45, as shown by Fig. 8. l i hile holding these sheets on the prongs 45 the shifting member is swung to the left slightly to clear the sheets from the prongs 22 and thereupon the shifting, device member having the prongs 15 is moved longitudinally one space or two spaces as desired, the shifting device as a whole being then again swung to the right in overlapped relation with the prongs 22 and the cards in hand are then permitted to fall. back upon the pile from which taken, they then being in a different longitudinal position Should the operator desire to insert a card or cards to occupy space in the series where provided by the shifting operation he places such card or cards on the appropriate binder posts 22 while the shifted cards are still on the prongs 4-5, and in this connection it may be mentioned that the operator can hold such cards on the prongs 4-5 with the thumb of his left hand while adding another card or cards to the prongs 22 with his right hand, 01' he can swing the device to the left into a resting position and remove his left hand.

Having performed the desired operations with the shifting device the member including the prongs 4L5 is adjusted longitudinally if necessary and .then lowered, and then the device as a whole may be laid over to one side in an out-of-tl'ie-way posi tion. In this connection it is pointed out that the notches 68 (Fig. 9) in the supporting member part 31 accommodate the prongs 45 respectively and serve as seats for the longitudinally shiftable element determining in an easy way for the operator when the shiftable member is in proper position for closing the book. Fig. 1 shows that the shifting device as a whole is entirely clear of the sheets when the book is closed, and that it is positioned in a rather small and substantially concealed space. Fig. 2 shows how free and open for use the device is when the binder members are in their open position.

While I have illustrated and described herein a highly advantageous embodimentof the present invention and improvements, I contemplate as being included in the present advance in the art all such changes, modifications and departures from what is specifically herein set forth as fall within the scope of the appended claims.

I claim:

1. In a loose-leaf binder having a pair of body menbers hinged together, with a row of prongs on each body member directed inwardly, the combination therewith of a sheet-shifting device mounted on the binder to occupy space substantially between the opposed rows of binder prongs when the shifting device is normally in use, and having a sheet-engaging part mounted to move longitudinally of the binder adjacent to the prongs thereof when in use and to move into and out-of-tl1e way position when not in use.

2. In a loose-leaf binder having a pair of body members hinged together, with a row of prongs on each body member directed inwardly, the combination therewith of a sheet-shifting device having a part mounted to move longitudinally of the binder and having means for engaging perforated sheets carried by one row of the binder prongs, said sheet-shifting device being hingedly mounted on the binder and be ing arranged to occupy space substantially between the opposed rows of binder prongs when the shifting device is normally in use, and to move out of operative sheet-engaging position when not in use.

3. In a loose-leaf binder having two oppositely disposed rows of prongs for holding loose-leaf sheets, the combination therewith of a sheet-shifting device mounted to occupy space substantially between the opposed rows of binder prongs and having a part with a row of prongs thereon mounted to move adjacent to and substantially opposite the line of free ends of the prongs of one of the body members, said part having said prongs being mounted to move longitudinally also, whereby sheets may be transferred from the binder member prongs to the shifting device prongs and, after a shifting movement of the latter, be transferred back to binder prongs and be in another longitudinal position in the binder.

4. In a loose-leaf binder having a pair of oppositely disposed body members hinged together and each provided with a row of prongs for holding loose-leaf sheets, the combination therewith of a sheet-shifting device mounted to occupy a position substantially between the binder prongs when the body members are in open position, said shifting device as a whole being hingedly mounted to swing toward and away from one of said rows of binder prongs and having a part with a row of prongs thereon mounted to move into a position adjacent to and substantially opposite the free ends of the prongs of one of the body members, said pronged part being mounted to move longitudinally also, whereby sheets may be transferred from the binder member prongs to the shifting device prongs and, after a shifting movement of the latter prongs, be transferred back to binder prongs.

5. In a loose-leaf binder having a pair of body members hinged together, with a row of prongs on each body member directed inwardly, the combination therewith of supporting means hinged on the axis of the binder hinge, and a pronged member mounted on said supporting'means for movement into a position with its prongs adjacent to and substantially opposite the line of free ends of prongs of one of the binder members, and having movement in longitudinal directions also to shift sheets thereon into another longitudinal position for transfer back to binder prongs.

6. In a loose-leaf binder having a. pair of body members hinged together, with a row of prongs on each body member directed inwardly, the combination therewith of supporting means hinged on the axis of the binder hinge, and a pronged member mounted on said supporting means to move radially outward whereby its prongs may come adjacent to and substantially opposite the line of free ends of prongs of one of the binder members, said prong'ed member having limited movement in longitudinal directions on the supporting means to shift sheets thereon into another longitudinal position for transfer back to binder prongs.

7. In a loose-leaf binder having a pair of body members hinged together, with a row of prongs on each body member di rected inwardly, the combination therewitlgi of supporting means hinged on the axis of the binder hinge, and a pr'onged member slidably mounted on said supporting means to move radially outward whereby its prongs may come adjacent to and substantially opposite the line of free ends of the pri'ings of one of the binder members, and being mounted to move slidably on said supporting means in longitudinal directions also to shift sheets thereon into another longitudinal position, the prongs of said pronged member being arranged to overlap some of the binder prongs respectively when said supporting means are swung on the hinge thereof whereby perforated sheets on the binder prongs may be transferred to the pronged member prongs by means of per forations in the sheets not being occupied by binder prongs.

8. In a loose-leaf binder having a pair of relatively long body members hinged together side by side to swing away from and toward .each other, into open and closed positions respectively, each of said members being provided with a row of sheet-holding prongs directed inwardly for holding perforated sheets, the combination therewith'of a sheetshifting device having a part pro vided with a row of prongs, said. shifting device being mounted on the binder with its prongs occupying a position within the area enclosed by said body-member prongs when the body members are in closed position, said pronged part being carried by the device for movement. into a position whereby be free ends of its prongs are adja- 7 cent to and in a line substantially opposite the line of free ends of the prongs of one of said body members when the body members are in open position, said pronged part having longitudinal movement also, the arrangement being such that perforated sheets on the prongs of one of said body members may be transferred directly to said shifting device prongs, said shifting device prongs then moved longitudinally, and the so-transferred sheets then transferred back to certain prongs of the member from which they were transferred to the shifting device prongs, such sheets then occupying a different longitudinal position in the binder.

9. In a loose-leaf binder having a pair of relatively long body members hinged ,together side by side to swing away from and toward each other into open and closedposillt) tions respectively, each of said members" be ing provided with a row of sheet-holding prongs directed inwardly for holding perforated sheets, the combination therewith a sheet-shifting device comprising a part provided with a row of prongs andasupporting member mounted on the binder on the axis of the hinge connection between the body members, said part having a limited sliding movement radially outward and inward on said supporting member whereby th shifting, device prongs will occupy an out-oftheway position within the areaenclosed by said body member prongs when the body members are in closed position and may occupy a position in which the free ones of the shifting device prongs are adjacent to and substantially opposite the line of free endsof the prongs of one of said body memhere when the body members are in open position, said part being mounted to move longitudinally on said supporting member, the arrangement being such that sheets on the prongs of one of said body members may be transferred directly to said shifting device prongs when the latter have been moved radially outward, whereby said part may then be moved in a longitudinal direction, and whereby the sheets thereon may then be transferred back to certain prongs on the body member from which they were transferred to the shifting device prongs, the sheets then occupying thereon a different longitudinal position in the binder.

10. in a loose-leaf binder having a row of prongs arranged to hold a series of perforated cards or sheets in overlapped relation with a portion of each card or sheet of the series exposed, the combination therewith of a sheet-shifting device including a pronged member mounted on the binder to occupy a position out of operative engagement with sheets or cards in the binder when the shifting device is not in operative use, said shifting device member being mounted for movement to bring prongs thereon substantially opposite prongs of the binder. and being mounted for longitudinal movement whereby sheets or cards transferred from binder 1nongs to the shifting device prongs may be moved longitudinally therewith and then tansferred back to hinder prongs.

11. In a loose-leaf binder having a pair of body members hinged together, with a row of prongs on each body member directed inwardly and arranged to hold a series of perforated sheets or cards in overlapped relation with a portion of each card or sheet of the series exposed, the combination therewith of a sheet-shifting device including a sheet-holding member, said device being mounted on the binder to occupy a position out of operative engagement with sheets or cards in the binder when the shifting device is not in operative use, said sheet holding member having lateral relative movement to bring prongs thereof substantially opposite prongs in one row of the binder prongs, and having longitudinal relative moven'ient whereby sheets or cards transferred from binder prongs to the shifting device prongs may be moved longitudinally therewith and then transferred back to binder prongs.

12. In a loosedeaf binder having two rows of prongs arranged to hold a series of perforated sheets or cards in overlapped relation with a portion of each card or sheet of the series exposed, the combination therewith of a sheet-shifting device including a member having prongs and being mounted on the binder with the prongs of said member occupying a position out of operative engagement with cards or sheets in the binder when the shifting device is not in operative use, said shifting device pronged member having lateral relative movement to bring prongs thereof substantially opposite prongs in one row of the binder prongs, and having longitudii'ial relative i'novement whereby sheets or cards transferred from binder prongs to the shifting device prongs may be moved longitudinally therewith and then transferred back to binder prongs.

13. in a loose-leaf binder having a row of prongs arranged to hold a series of po forated cards or sheets in overlapped relation with a portion of each card or sheet of the series exposed, the combination therewith of a sheet-shiftingmember normally out of operative position when not in use, and means for holding said shifting member on the binder for movement into a position substantially opposite the binder prongs for transfer thereto of sheets or cards from binder prongs, and for longitudinal movements, when in such opposed position, to shift such cards or sheets longitudinally.

let. In a loosedeaf binder having a pair of opposed rows of prong. arranged to hold a series of perforated cards or sheets in overlapped relation with a portion of each card or sheet of the series exposed, the combination therewith of a sheet shifting member normally positioned substantially between the rows of binder prongs and spaced therefrom so as not to interfere therewith when the shifting device is not in use, and means for holding the shifting member on the binder for movement into a position substantially opposite the binder prongs for transfer thereto of sheets or cards from binder prongs, and for longitudinal movements, when in such opposed position, to shift such cards or sheets longitudinally.

15. lin a loose-leaf binder having pron s arranged to hold a series of perforated cards or sheets in overlapped relation with a portion of each card or sheet of the series exposed, the eombination therewith of a pronged sheet-shifting member normally out of operative position when not in use, and means for holding said shifting member on the binder for movement into a position substantially opposite the binder prongs for transfer thereto of sheets or cards from binder prongs, and for longitudinal move ments when in such opposed position, to shift such cards or sheets longitudinally.

16. In a loose-leaf binder having a pair of ll) bod members hin 'ed to ether with a row of prongs on each body member directed inwardly and arranged to hold a series of perforated cards or sheets in overlapped relation with a portion of each card or sheet exposed, the combination therewith of a member adapted to hold cards or sheets, and means for holding said sheet-hold. .5; member on the binder for movement into a position substantially opposite the binder 3i) prongs to receive cards or sheets therefrom,

for movement in directions toward and away from the free ends of the binder prongs, and for movements longitud nally of the binder to transfer cards or sheets back to hinder prongs in another longitudinal position.

17. In a loose-leaf binder having a pair of body members hinged together, with a row of prongs on each body member directed inwardly and arranged to hold a series of 39 perforated cards or sheets in overlapped relation with a portion of each card or sheet exposed, the combination therewith of a 'pronged' sheet-shifting member adapted to hold cards or sheets, and means for holding said sheet-shifting member on the binder for movement into a position substantially opposite the binder prongs to receive cards or sheets therefrom, for movement in directions toward and away from the free ends of the binder prongs, and for movements longiof body members hinged together, with a row of prongs on each body member directed inwardly and arranged to hold a series of perforated cards or sheets in overlapped relation with a portion of each card or sheet exposed, the combination therewith of a pronged member adapted to hold cards or sheets, and means for holding said pronged member on the binder for outward movement into a position substantially opposite the r," 1 I binder prongs to receive cards or sheets therefrom, for swinging movements in directions toward and away from the free ends of the binder prongs, and for sliding movements longitudinally of the binder.

19. In a loose-leaf binder having a row of, prongs arranged to hold a series of perforated sheets or cards in overlapped relation with portion of each sheet or card of the series exposed, the combination therewith of a sheet-shifting device having a swinging member pivotally mounted on the binder adjacent to the binder prongs for movements in general directions toward and away from the free ends of the binder prongs, a member slidably mounted on said swinging member to move in directions away from and toward the pivotal connection thereof, said slioably-mounted member being mounted also to move slidably in longitudinal directions on the swinging member, and a row of; prongs on said slidablyemounted member.

20. In a loose-leaf binder having a row of prongs arranged to hold a series of perlorated cards or sheets in overlapped relation with a portion of each, card or sheet of the series exposed, the combination therewith of a member having a row of prongs thereon with means for holding said member in attached relation to the binder and for relative movement to bring the prongs thereon substantially opposite binder prongs to receive cards or sheets therefrom and for relative movement longitudinal of'the binder to carry such cards or sheets longitudinally for transfer back to binder prongs to be in another long tudinal position in the binder. 21. In a lOOSG lGlllb'lIldBl having two rows of prongs directed toward each other and inhinged relation to each other andbeing ar 'anged to hold a series offperforated cards or sheets in overlapped relation with a por tion of each card or sheet of the series exposed, the combination tlierewithof a member having a row of prongs thereon with means for holding said member in attached relation to the binder and for relative movement to bring the prongs thereon substanti ally opposite binder pron to receive cards or sheets therefrom, and for relative movement longitudinally of the binder to carry such cards or sheets longitudinally for-transfer back to binder prongs to be in another longitudinal position in the binder.

ALFRED M. MARTIN.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4352582 *Jan 8, 1980Oct 5, 1982Erik EliassonLoose leaf binder
Classifications
U.S. Classification402/32, 402/47
International ClassificationB42F13/28, B42F13/00
Cooperative ClassificationB42F13/28
European ClassificationB42F13/28