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Publication numberUS1618980 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 1, 1927
Filing dateJun 11, 1925
Priority dateJun 11, 1925
Publication numberUS 1618980 A, US 1618980A, US-A-1618980, US1618980 A, US1618980A
InventorsJohn M Fedders
Original AssigneeFedders Mfg Co Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Radiator core
US 1618980 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

' March 1, 1927.

Filed Junell, 1925 J. M. FEDDERS RADIATOR CORE 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 March 1, 1927.

.1. M. FEDDERS RADIATOR CORE Filed Junell, 1925 2 Sheets-SheetZ Patented Mar. 1, 1927.

UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE.

JOHN M. FEDDEBS, OF BUFFALO, NEW YORK, ASSIGNOR TO FEDDERS MANUFACTUR- ING COMPANY, INC., OF BUFFALO, NEW YORK, A CORPORATION OF NEW YORK.

RADIATOR CORE.

Application filed. June 11, 1925. Serial No. 36,533.

This invention relates to cores for automobile gas engine radiators and has the purpose of providing cores for such radiators which will yield greater eficiency and permit of manufacturing the same -more economically;

This invention is an improvement on the structure shown in my application for Letters Patent Serial No. 8,556, filed February 11, 1925. I I

"In the accompanying drawings Fig. 1, is a front elevation, partlyin section of a radiator embodying my improvements.

- Fig. 2, is a horizontal section of the same taken on line 22, Fig. 1..

Fig. 3, is a fragmentary vertical transverse section on an enlarged scale of aradiating strip and two corrugated spacing strips engaging opposite sides thereof.

Fig. 4, is a perspective view of the same.

Fig. 5, is a perspective view of one of the radiating strips. I

' Similar characters of reference indicate like parts throughout the several views.

The numerals 20 and 21 represent the upper and lower water boxes or headers which may be connected with the supply and return pipes of the gas engine cooling system in any suitable and well known manner.

Between the headers is arranged the cooling core of the radiator which consists essentially of a plurality of upright water tubes 22 communicating at their upper ends with the bottom of the upper header and at their lower ends with the top of the lower header, and a plurality of horizontal air passages 23, 24 arranged between adjacent water tubes and extending from the front side to the rear side of the radiator.

Each of the water tubes is constructed of a single sheet of metal which is bent to form two upright fiat parallel longitudinal walls 25, a rear turn 26 connecting the rear edges of said walls, two inwardly off-set flanges 19 arranged at the front edges of said walls and connected together by soldering or otherwise to form a Water tight .joint'there between, and horizontal end flanges 27 arranged at the u per and lower ends of the walls and oifset Eanges and projecting laterally from opposite sides of the tube.

'A- plurality of tubes of this character are arranged in a transverse row between the upper and lower headers and spaced suitable distances apart. The upper and lower flanges of each tube have their longitudinal edges connected with the corresponding edges of the upper and lower flanges of adjacent water tubes so as to form in effect a plate at the upper end of the tubes which is secured by soldering or: otherwise to the upper header and closes the bottom thereof and a plate at the lower ends of the tubes which is secured by soldering or otherwise to the lower header so as to form the top thereof.

Along opposite outer sides of the walls of each Water tube are arranged two spacing strips of sheet metal which are corrugated. The two strips are formed of a single sheet of metal which is bent so that the two sections form two corrugated strips which are folded or doubled so that the same are arranged side by side and are conof their corresponding longitudinal edges are disconnected but oppose each other. When the metal sheet is thus folded each of its corrugated strips forms an inner set of corrugations and an outer set of corrugations and the summits 35 of the inner set of corrugations oppose each other so as to form a vertical row of said air passages 23 while the outer summits 36 of the outer set of corrugations are opposed to the corre-' sponding summits of the outer corrugations of spacing stripsas'sociated with adjacent water tubes and form therewith vertical rows of said air passages 24. j

The central or intermediate parts of the summits 35 of the innerset of corrugations are offset laterally, as shown at 37, so that such offsets on companion summits 35 together form a tubular seat while the end portions 38 of these summits next to the connecting turn 261 between the two spacing strips and the end portions 39 of these summits at the disconnected edges of these strips oppose each other in rear and in front of the respective water tube.

One of these water tubes is seated at intervals throughout its length in the tubular seats 37 between the opposing summits'of the inner corrugations of the two strips arranged on opposite sides of this tube and the latter also traverses the air passages 23 formed between these strips so that the air in passing through said passages will come in direct contact with the portions of the tube exposed in said passages and carry away the heat which is transmitted to the same from the water passing through the tubes.

The disconnected front edges of the two spacing strips associated with each water tube are preferably connected by soldering with the outer sides of the longitudinal flanges 19 of this tube.

In order to increase the transmission of heat to the air, radiating wings, tongues or bafiies 40, 41, 42 are struck out of the body of the sheet metal forming these strips so that the same project laterally from these strips into the path of the air as the same passes through the air passages and intercept the air.

In order to still further increase the transference of heat from the water in the water tubes to the air passing through the air passages auxiliary means are provided which are constructed as follows The numeral 50 represents a plurality of upright radiating strips or plates of sheet metal each of which is arranged lengthwise between the opposing spacing strips of two adjacent water tubes. Each of these radiating strips is engaged on its opposite sides by the outer summits 36 of the outer corrugations of two opposing spacing strips and is firmly gripped therebetween so as to produce a good metallic contact therewith and thereby enable the radiating strip to take some of the heat from the respective spacing strips and transfer it to the air which comes into contact with opposite sides of the respective radiating strip.

For the purpose of interlocking the radiating strips with the spacing strips that part .of each radiating strip and the adjacent parts of the outer summits of the corrugated spacing strips engage with opposite sides thereof and are interlocked by forming a set of projections 60, 61, 62 on the three plies of the respective overlying strips some of which engage with some of the set registering openings 63, 6a, formed in these strips by the displacement of the metal constituting said projections 60, 61, 62, as shown in Fig. 3.

. The projections 60, 61, 62 are preferably arranged at the upper and lower ends of the openings 63, 64c, 65 so that the ends of two sets of projections face each other, thereby enabling two sets of projections to be formed when pushing out the metal from the three plies of strips while forming an opening in each ply, as shown in the same figure. The several lugs or wings of each set are preferably fanned out or spread at their outer ends, as shown in Figs. 1, 3 and 4, so as to permit each one to come into contact with the air and thus increase the heat radiating effect of the core: accordingly.

These sets of locking projections are preferably arranged in longitudinal rows, and the several sets in each row preferably project laterally alternately in opposite directions into the adjacent air passages so that the streams of air passing therethrough will abstract heat from these projections and aid in cooling the water passing through the water tubes.

In addition to the locking projections each of the radiating strips is provided on those parts thereof, which are not engaged by the outer summits of the corrugated spacing strips, with radiating projections, wings or lugs 66 which are arranged in longitudinal rows and the wings in each row projecting alternately from opposite sides of the respective radiating strip into the adjacent air passages, thereby further intercepting the currents of air and causing the same to carry away some of the heat of the water.

By thus providing the radiating strips with wings some of which serve to interlock adjacent radiating and spacing strips a greater rigidity is imparted to the structure as a whole and increased radiating eliiciency is obtained without increasing the amount of metal in the core. 7

I claim as my invention 1. A radiator comprising a plurality of water tubes and a plurality of air passages arranged between adjacent water tubes, each of said water tubes having opposite sheet metal walls, two spacing strips of corrugated sheet metal arranged on opposite sides of each water tube and each spacing strip having alternating inner and outer summits, the inner summits engaging the opposite sides of said water tubes, and a plurality of radiating strips of sheet metal each radiating strip arranged between the outer summits of two opposing spacing strips and forming three plies therewith, and each of said plies being provided with a locking lug which interlocks with the remaining plies.

2. A radiator comprising a plurality of water tubes and a plurality of air passages arranged between adjacent water tubes, each of said water tubes having opposite sheet metal Walls, two spacing strips of corrugated sheet metal arranged on opposite sides of each water tube and each spacing strip having alternating inner and outer summits, the inner summits engaging the opposite sides of said water tubes, and a plurality of radiating strips of sheet metal each radiating strip arranged between the outer summits of two opposing spacing strips and forming three plies therewith, and said plies having corresponding parts thereof displaced therefrom to form sets of registering openings and sets of lugs projecting laterally from the edges of some of these openings into some of the other openings for interlocking the several plies.

3. A radiator comprising a plurality of water tubes and a plurality of air passages arranged between adjacent water tubes, each of said water tubes having opposite sheet metal walls, two spacing strips of corrugated sheet metal arranged on opposite sides of each Water tube and each spacing strip having alternating inner and outer summits, the inner summits engaging the opposite sides of said water tubes, and a plurality of radiating strips of sheet metal each radiating strip arranged between the outer summits of two opposing spacing strips and forming three plies therewith and said plies having corresponding parts thereof displaced therefrom to form sets of registering openings and sets of lugs projecting laterally from opposite edges of these openings and forming an interlock between the respective plies.

JOHN M. FEDDERS.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2703226 *Apr 24, 1946Mar 1, 1955Modine Mfg CoRadiator fin structure
US6672376 *Dec 27, 2000Jan 6, 2004Visteon Global Technologies, Inc.Twisted-louver high performance heat exchanger fin
Classifications
U.S. Classification165/153, 165/DIG.385
International ClassificationF28F1/12
Cooperative ClassificationY10S165/385, F28F1/128
European ClassificationF28F1/12D2