Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS1622827 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 29, 1927
Filing dateSep 6, 1922
Priority dateSep 6, 1922
Publication numberUS 1622827 A, US 1622827A, US-A-1622827, US1622827 A, US1622827A
InventorsClinton H Hanson
Original AssigneeMotor Player Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Means for actuating player pianos
US 1622827 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

QATZYS.

N M 8, n 2 w W W\ m am 1, a. K W t A S Tum 4 6 M vY v C. H. HANSON MEANS FOR ACTUATING PLAYER PIANOS Fi led Sept. 6, 1922' Mgrch 29 1927.

M r h 29 192 a c c.. H. HANSON MEANS FOR ACTUATING PLAYER PIANOS Filed Sept. 6, 1922 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVEIQTOR $745;

m2 M 54/65 a 4 2 192 v March 2 7 C.'H. HANSON MEANS FOR ACTUATING PLAYERPIANOS 'Filed Sept. 6, 1922 4 Sheets-Sheetifi IN'VENTOK- /12 N WW March 29, 1927. c H HANSON 2 MEANS FOR AGTUATING PLAYER PIANOS Filed Sept. 6, 1922 Patented Mar. 29, 1927.

UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE.

CLINTON H. HANSON, OF CHICAGO, ILLINOIS, ASSIGNOR TO THE MOTOR PLAYER CORPORATION, OF CHICAGO,.ILLINOIS, CORPORATION OF ILLINOIS.

MEANS FOR ACTUATING PLAYER PIANOS.

This invention pertains to improvements in vacuum producing devices such as are used for actuating the pneumatics of player pianos. The improvements contemplated are adaptable for use with such suction producing devices as illustrated in Patent No. 1,320,224, issued October 28, 1919,- to the Electora Manufacturing Company as assignee of George V. Garman, and such as shown, described and claimed in my Patent No. 1,565,932 issued December 15, 1925.

Briefly such devices comprise a motor and fan unit which is operated at a high rate of speed, and is employed for exhausting air from the windchest, which is directly connected with the actuating pneumatics of a' player piano. One of the difficulties encountered with the operation of such unit is the silencing of the motor, without increasing the back pressure, and consequently without decreasing the vacuum attained by the machine. Another difiiculty is the provision for lubrication without the employment of a complicated construction.

Accordingly. my invention is directed toward the construction of a vacuum producing device which possesses a minimum number of parts, and is arranged in such manner as to eliminate the transmission'of sound waves incident to the operation of the unit. The invention is also concerned with the provision of a unit which may be readily dismantled and reassembled in the most ex- PQtlltlOllS manner.

The means for carrying out my invention will be hereinafter fully set forth in the following description which pertains to the accompanying drawings, and the essential features will be summarized in the claims.

In the drawings, Fig. 1 is a vertical section through a machine having improvements embodying my invention; Figs. 2, 3 and 4 are sections taken on the lines 2-2; 33; .44 respectively in Fig. 1; Fig. 5 is r a bottom view-of the power unit removed from the housing or container and showing the relative position of the flap valves thereon; Figs. 6, 7 and 8 are details in the nature of sections through various parts of the power unit; and Fig. 9 is a view partly in section and partly in elevation showing the relative arrangcn'ient between the power unit and the housing therefor, the essential elements being shown somewhat separated.

One of the essential objects of my invention, as above stated, is to provide means for obtaining eflicient sound insulation of a vacuum producing unit. Accordingly, I have showna unit as embodying a motor having an armature 10 which is supported in bearings indicated generally at 11 and 12. These bearings are journaled at the top and bottom of the armature shaft 13 within-a casing, part of which forms a motor frame 14. The lower part of the casing forms a housing 1 5. F an blades mounted on the shaft 13 are indicated at 16, and are so arranged as to cause a current of air to flow downwardly through the motor, thence through the varione fan chambers, and out of the bottom chamber through ports 17. In this form of construction, the motor and fan become a unitary structure which may be handled as a unit to place it in the container or remove it therefrom. The combination of a motor and fan will be hereinafter referred to as the power unit. I

To eliminate the noise or hum incident to the operation of the power unit, I provide a housing which entirely surrounds the unit and is spaced therefrom by suitable sound insulating material. This housing is shown as embodying upper and lower sections 20 and 21 adapted to be joined in a plane transversely thereof. Each section may comprise a hollow box-like wooden member so formed thatwhen the unit is assembled within the housing. the top and bottom thereof is closed. The space intermediate the unit and the housing is filled with sound insulating material. I have found that satisfactory results may be obtained by using a granular substance such as ground cork, saw dust, or granular rubber; this material being indicated at 25. The two sections are held together by suitable means, such as corner plates indicated at 26, which are arranged to be attached to the sections above and below the plane, of separation thereof.

The casing as heretofore stated has the lower part shaped toprovide a fan housing. The upper part of the casing in the preferred form embodies a muflier 30 which is illustrated as a dome shaped member having a flange 31 which is held in abutting engagement with the lower portion of the easing as by spaced securing members 33. Thus when the mufller is attached to the fanvhousing, I provide acasing which is maintained in spaced relationship to the outer enclosin housin y making the casing principally of metal and by making the housing of wood, the housing is more impervious to the passage of sound waves therethrough than the easing. This tends to make the device more quiet ,in operation, and at-t-he same timeto the mufiier 30 to the metallic casing 15, I may provide a metallic ring 32 which is' shown as embedded in the upper surface of the flange 31 and is provided with threaded openings to engage screws 33, as indicated particularly in Fig. 7. In this way the section 21 may be removed from the section 20, thus leaving the power unit attached to the other section. In the lower section, a mufller is indicated as a metallic cup-shaped member 35 which extends beneath the power unit and is provided with an opening 38 which serves as an exhaust air passageway. The power unit may be held in spacedrelation to the muffler 35 by means of flexible cushion blocks 36 which rest-upon the bottom member 35, and engage the under side of the fan blade casing 15.

The interior of the member 35, that is, the portion adjacent the vertical walls thereof, may be lined with sound insulating material, as at 37, while across the bottom suitable means maybe employed for preventing the insulating material 25 from entering the fan chamber, and at the same time for preventing dust and lint from entering the material 25. To this end. I have shown a wire screen 39 which is laid across the opening 38. This is particularly illustrated in Fig. 6. Above the screen 39, I have shown a strainer 40 which is mounted on a removable member 41\whereby the strainer may be readily cleaned whenever desired. This removable member preferably comprises a ring which is adapted to engage the inner surface of the member 35. x

As a further means for entrapping or deadening sound waves within the housing, I have shown two flap valves 45 which are mounted on the under side of the fan chamber and are adapted to be held in engagement therewith by suitable springs 46 which are held in place by securing member 47. Normally, the springs retain the flap valves in engagement with the outer surface of the fan chamber whereby the ports 17 are closed,

thus retaining considerable noise within the machine when the piano is operated by means of the usual foot pedals. Then too, when the power unit is set in operation, the flap valves cause further battling of the exhaust air, thus tending to reduce the transmission of sound waves into the atmosphere.

Air is admitted into the housing through a passageway 50 indicated in the side of the section 20. This passageway may be formed by securing a flanged conduit 51 at the side of the housing, and by connecting said conduit to a nipple 52 projecting outwardly from the mufiier 30. I may employ a flexible conduit 53 intermediate the nipple and conduit 51 as indicated in Fig. 1. The outer end of the conduit 51 may be attached to a tube 51 which is arranged to be connected with the actuating pneumatics of a piano (not shown).

\Vith this form-of construction, the vacum producing unit is practically free from any rigid connection to either section of the housing. Accordingly, the unit gradually settles into engagement-with the cushioning means 36. Since the supporting member 35 is embeddedin the granular insulating material, it follows that the insulating material serves av three-fold function, namely ;a support for the power unit, a passageway for the exhaust air, and a means for absorbing sound waves, thus effecting the silent operation of the machine. The insulating material in the upper section is preferably powdered or ground rubber, but in the lower is preferably cork or sawdust. In this way,

warm air from the motor and fan does not carry an offensive odor, which is likely to be given off by the rubber.

\Vith the arrangement described, the power unit may be readily removed by separating the housing adjacent the meeting edges of the sections. In Fig. 9, the separated sections with the power unit disposed therebetween illustrate the relation of the associated parts. Accordingly, each section when removed comprises a member having a cavity therein into which part of the power unit is adapted to extend. It is desirable therefore. to effect such removal without disturbing the arrangement of the insulation. To this end, I may provide a fabric disc 60 as shown in Fig. 7 which extends between the flange 31 and the edges of the section 20, and a similar disc 61. which extends between the mufiler 35 and the edges of the lower section 21. To prevent contact between any of the metallic parts and the casing, I have shown a section of insulating material such as felt 62, disposed adjacent the plane of separation of the housing. This section preferably extends entirely around themarginal edges of -the muflier, and serves to prevent the passage of air into the upper section of the housing. Moreover by making the disc 60 of comparatively heavy fabric such as canv'as and cementing it thoroughly to the flange 31 and also by clamping it to the felt between the housing sections, then this disc will function to prevent rotation of the unit with reference to the housing upon starting of the motor. This allows the passageway 50 in the housing to be disposed out of alignment with the passageway in the casing 30 while the flexible tube 53 makes the opera tive connection in a satisfactory manner.

\Vhen the motor is set in operation, air is caused to flow through the usual operating pneumatics ot' the piano into the conduit 50, thence through the power unit as indicated by the arrows. Upon leaving the unit, the air passes through a strainer 40, screen 39 and thence through the granular insulation in the lower section of the container, whence it is ejected through openings adjacent the corners of the container. The inner Walls of the container adjacent the openings are preferably covered by fabric indicated at 71 to prevent the passage of granular material out of the container. In this way, the insulation provides av passageway for the air, and at the same time serves as an insulating medium to retain sound waves within the container.

By constructing a vacuum producing de vice embodying my invention, the power 'unit may be assembled entirely independently of the container. This construction permits the bearings to be readily lubricated without removing the motor armature or its associated mechanism from the support, forming the motor fan chamber, and without displacing the sound insulating material intermediate the unit and housing.

I claim I 1. In a vacuum producing device for operating player pianos, the combination with a vacuum producing unit. of a casing enclosing the unit, an enclosing housing spaced from the casing and having a vertical wall, a flexible inlet conduit connecting the housing and easing, said housing having outlet openings in said vertical wall. means acting independently of the conduit for preventing rotation of the casing with reference to the housing when the unit is placed in operation, and said housing embodying material having a different rate of sound wave conductivity than the casing material.

QQIn a vacuum producing device for operating player pianos, the combination with a vacuum producing unit of a casing surrounding the unit and having inlet and outlet apertures therein. a housing enclosing the -asing'and being spaced therefrom, granular sound insulating material packed closely between a portion of the casing and the housing. means connecting the housing and the casing for preventing relative rotative movement of the housing and casing when said unit is set into operation, a flexwaves therethrough' than the remaining portion thereof, a housing enclosing the casing. granular sound insulating material disposed between the housing and the casing, a fiexible conduit providingcommunication between the interior of the casing and the ev-v terior of the housing, and an air outlet in the housing, whereby a jacket of air is caused to flow through the insulation before passing out of the housin 4. A device for operating the pneumatics of a player piano con'iprising in combination, a housing having an inlet and an outlet port, a casing within the housing, one part of the casing embodying pliable material and another part of the casing embodying rigid material whcrebyone part of the casing presents a greater resistance to the passage of sound waves therethrough than another part of the casing, granular sound insulating material disposed intermediate the housing and casing. means for conducting air into the casing through said inlet without contact with said insulation, and means whereby air passing through the casing is caused to flow through the insulation.

5. In a device of the character described housing enclosing the casing and comprising a. pair of opposed separable sections joined intermediate the ends of the housing, sound insulating n'iate-rial disposed intermediate the housing and casing and closely enveloping the casing, a flexible inlet passageway leading through the side of one of the sections of the housing and communicating with the interior of the casing. a discharge aperture in the side of the housing in the other of said sections, the ends of said housing being closed. whereby air flowing through the unit is caused to follow a tortuous path around the casing and to flow directly through the insulation and out the side of the housing.

6. In a device for actuating the pneumatics of a player piano, the combination with a vacuum producing unit, of a casing surrounding the unit and having a portion housing thereof formed of pliable material, an enclosing housing surrounding the casing, sound insulating material disposed intermediate the casing and housing and a flexible conduit extending through the insulation and providing communication be tween the interior of the casing and the exterior of the casing.

7. In combination, a vacuum producing unit, a casing therefor, said casing comprising a plurality of sections, at least one of the sections being made of pliable material, a housing for the casing, said housing comprising separable sections having openings in the side thereof, an opening in one of the sections comprising an inlet passageway and an opening in the other of said sections comprising a discharge passageway, granular insulating material disposed between the housing and casing, the pliable section of the casing comprising a wall for retaining the insulation in position when the housing is separated.

8. In combination, a vacuum producing unit, a casing therefor, said casing comprising two separablesections, one section comprising a cup-shaped pliable member having a radial flange adjacent the rim thereof, a housing surrounding the casing, closely packed granular insulation disposed intermediate the casing and housing, said insulation being retained by the cup-shaped section and the flange thereof.

9. In combination a vacuum producing unit, a casing therefor, a cup-shaped battle enclosing a portion of the casing, a housing disposed outside the baffle and closely packed granular insulating material between the baille and housing, whereby air flowing from the unit passes through the interstices between the particles'of insulation.

10. In combination, a vacuum producing unit, a casing therefor, a housing surrounding the casing and comprising a plurality of separable sections joined intermediately, the

being more imperviousto the passage'of sound waves than the casing, closely packed granular insulating material between the casing and housing, a fabric connection between the housing and casing for preventing relative angular movement of the casing with reference to the housing, said housing having air inlet and outlet openings intermediate the top and bottom thereof, a flexible conduit connecting the casing to the inlet opening in the housing whereby air is re-' stricted to a confined passage throughthe insulation upon entering the casing, and the air being discharged from the casing being caused to flow'through the interstices between the particles of insulation, and being unconfined while flowing from the unit to the outlet opening in the housing.

11. In combination, a vacuum producing unit, a casing therefor, 21 housing enclosing the casing, said housing comprising a plurality of separable sections, granular insulation disposed within one section intermediate the housing and casin means for preventing the circulation of air through the insulation within said section, granular insulation between the casing-and the other of said sections and means wherebythe air is caused to flow unconfined through the insulation in the last mentioned section.

12. In combination, a vacuum producing unit, a casing, therefor, a housing surrounding the casing and comprising a pair of separable sections, granular insulating material disposed intermediate the casing and housing, said material being in close-fitting engagement with a portion. of the casing and comprising a support therefor,'said casing having a dome-shaped section of pliable material adapted to provide a retaining wall for a portion of the insulation, means for connecting the pliable section tothe remaining portion of the casing, and means for connecting the pliable section to the housing so as to prevent. rotation of the casing when the.,unit is in operation.

13. In combination, a vacuum producing unit, a casing therefor, 11 housing enclosing the casing and comprising a plurality of sepa'able sections, granular sound insulating material intermediate the casing and housing, means for retaining the insulation in one section in position independently of the in sulation in the other section, a conduit providing a passageway for air between the housing and the casing' means whereby the insulation surrounding the conduit embodies numerous dead air cells, and means for per mitting the passage-of air directly throughthe insulation of the other section, whereby circulation of air is maintained therethrough.

14. In combination, a vacuum producing unit, a casing therefor. a housing enclosing the casing. the casing comprising two coopcrating sections and said housing comprising formed of pliable material, whereby greater resistance is offered to the passage of sound waves therethrough than through the other of said members. i

16. In a device of the class described, the combination with a vacuum producing unit, of a housing therefor comprising separable sections, each having a cavity adapted to receive part of the unit, sound insulating material intermediate the unit and sections for providing an air assageway, a cupshaped bafile outside t e unit and within one of the sections and a removable strainer carried by said baffie.

' 17. In a device of the class described, the combination with a vacuum producing unit, of a casing therefor, at least a portion of -said casing being of pliable material, a housing, and a conduit connecting the housing to the casing.

18. In a device of the class described, the combination with a vacuum producing unit, of a pliable member surrounding a part of the unit and spaced therefrom to provide an air passageway, a housing surrounding said member, sound insulating material disposed intermediate the member and housing, and a passageway for providing communication between the exterior of the housing and the interior of said member.

19. In a device of the class described, the combination with a vacuum producing unit embodying a motor and fan chamber, a casing comprising a pliable member surrounding the motor portion of the unit, and a housing enclosing the casing.

In testimony whereof, I hereunto afiixmy signature.

CLINTON HANSON.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2690513 *Jan 2, 1952Sep 28, 1954Hoover CoMotor cooling system
US2808227 *Jun 10, 1953Oct 1, 1957Neyrpic EtsMeans for absorbing vibrations
US2888093 *May 17, 1955May 26, 1959Electrolux AbSound-dampening structure for suction cleaners
US3464864 *Jun 4, 1968Sep 2, 1969Us ArmyButton for holding thermocouples to the skin surface of subjects
US3791774 *Aug 31, 1972Feb 12, 1974Philips CorpVacuum cleaner unit
US4396359 *Jul 20, 1981Aug 2, 1983Carrier CorporationMotor compressor unit
US5904471 *Dec 20, 1996May 18, 1999Turbodyne Systems, Inc.Cooling means for a motor-driven centrifugal air compressor
EP0956447A2 *Dec 11, 1997Nov 17, 1999Turbodyne Systems Inc.Motor-driven centrifugal air compressor
WO1998030790A2 *Dec 11, 1997Jul 16, 1998Turbodyne Sys IncCooling means for a motor-driven centrifugal air compressor
Classifications
U.S. Classification417/423.14, 310/60.00R, 15/326, 417/371, 415/119
International ClassificationA63H17/32, A47L9/00
Cooperative ClassificationA47L9/00, G10F1/02, A63H17/32
European ClassificationA63H17/32, A47L9/00, G10F1/02