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Publication numberUS1623286 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 5, 1927
Filing dateJun 1, 1926
Priority dateJun 1, 1926
Publication numberUS 1623286 A, US 1623286A, US-A-1623286, US1623286 A, US1623286A
InventorsStrahan James L
Original AssigneeLouden Machinery Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Air control for ventilating systems
US 1623286 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April 5 1927. I

AIR CONTROL FOR VENTILATING SYSTEMS Filed June 1, 1926 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 %M mam J. L. STRAHAN April 5 1927. 1,623,286

AIR CONTROL FOR VENTILATING SYSTEMS Filed June 1, 1926 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 1927'. Apnl 5 J. L. STRAHAN AIR CONTROL FOR VENTILATING SYSTEMS Filed June 1, 1926 3 Sheets-Sheet 5 Patented Apr. 1927.

, UNITED STATES PATENT [om-c James L. srnanam or FAIRFIELD, IOWA, assmiwon' TO THE Lounnn MACHINERY- comranr, or ramrmnn, Iowa, A

CORPORATION OF IOWA.

CONTROL FOR VENTILATING SYSTEMS.

Application fi led June 1 My invention relates to means for admitting'air into a. building or other place in I' which a ventilating system is installed, especially, asystem of natural draft ventila- ,tion in which .difl'erences of temperature and wind pressures are the principal operative forces; and it consists of means for auto-' matically regulating the admission of the outside air into-the building, and also, for automatically preventing back-draft, or the outlet of air from the building through the intake openings, which back-draft is liable to interfere with the proper'operation of the ventilation. It also consists of othe'r 1mprovements in the construction .and arrangement of, the control-.mechamsm which wlll' be described in the specification, and more definitely set forth in the claims.

In the accompanying drawings, forming a part of this specification, Fig 1 is a perspectiveofa "housing for anair control for {a ventilating system, as it appears when attached to the wall of ia building, the construction sh'own embodying my .invention'.

' Fig. 2 is a transvere section on line 22 of Fig. 1, the control-mechanism appearing at rest, or when preventing back-draft, or

the passage of air out of the building through the intake openings. Fig. 3 is the same as Fig. 2, with the exception that the control mechanism is shown in an operative. position and thesection of the wall of the.

building isomitted. Fig. 4 is the same 'as' Fig. '3, except that the control mechanism is shown closed to prevent the ailmission of;

' ail'i-nto the'buil ding or other, place to be ven-,

'tilated, which will be explained later on.

Fig. this an elevation of the operative control mechanism as it appears when looking at it. frofi'the inside of Fig. 2. Figs. 6 and 7 are',det ail views which will'be hereafter explained. Fig. 8 is a transverse section on line 88--of F ig. 6.- Fig. 9'is.a transverse section of a modified form of'the air control.

2 .Referring toxthe drawings, A represents a portion of the outside wall of a; building to. which, as shown in Fig. 1, thehousing' of the control mechanism is l attached The housing is essentially a hollow structure,

preferably made ofsheet inetal. It has side enclosures B and B, ends'C, a. bottom D,- and a. top E, preferably madev in, the form of a removable lid or cover. A distance from the. bottom of the housing 'on the .outer side an opening an adjoining part of the otherwise,

19%. serial lq'o. 113,035.

adjoining the wall of the building the side B is: deflected inwardly so as to form the obliquely disposed portion B and then it" is deflected outwardly until it per end of the inwardly deflected portion H is extended inward laterally to nearly the central part of the housing. The outward deflection on this side is equally pronounced but it does not rise quite so high as on the other side, and in this portion there is "also I I equal in size to the opening .G. Through these openings, F, Gand I, the admission of the outside air into the building'is controlled by the operative mechanism hereinafter described. 1

On the bottom D, two standards J are mounted preferably about an equal distance from each end of the housing and from each other. These standards are preferably of wood set in 'shect metal sockets K which are soldered or otherwise secured to the housing bottom D. In the upper'ends of these standards are bearing recesses L, as most plain-1y shownin Fig. 6 which is an enlarged" side view of-o'ne of the standards J and the a small portion cured. A pivot rod or shaft M is placed in the reces-es of these standards and a plate N, preferably of aluminum or other light'mate cled around the rod or shaft M, the encircling edge ofthe plate N being cutaway at the standards J, and also where other at tachments areconnected to the shaft M, as 'shown in Fig. 5. 7

To prevent the plate N from slippingor twisting on the shaft M, clips .0, each having an extendedupperend, are secured to .rial, has its lower edge wrapped or encir-- the shaft by rivets or otherwise, and their extended upper ends are likewise "secured to I plate. On a central part of the shaft is secured byrivets or' a member having. a downwardly extending .threaded stem R and a threaded locknut thereon. A weight member S is fitted with a threaded central perforation the proper size to admit the threaded stem R and the lock nut being laced on the lower end of the stem, the welg t S will held thereon a's'shown in Fig. 5. The function of the -'weight' S is to approximately balance the plate N on the pivot shaft M and by'tu'rning the weight up or down on the threaded Stem R and adjusting the lock nut thereon this may be varied as desired. The upper end of the member having the threaded stein R is broadened where it encircles the shaft M and is preferably bifurcatcd asshown.

In this bifurcation -i s...'tl'1'e upper end of a rod or wire T'bent so'as to encircle the shaft M-and to freely swing thereon in the bifur cation. The lower end'of the rod or wire T is straight and is also threaded and fitted with two threaded nuts V.- Another weight member U is shown in Fig. .5 behind'the weight S. This weightUmember U is fitted it is shown in' dotted lines,

. the other side.

. damper. plate N with H a central perforation "through which the lower threaded end of the rod or wire T is passed. The weight is held'in place by the upper and lower nutsV placed thereon, and it may be adjusted up or down by adjusting the nuts V. Transverse sections of these weights and their connections are shown in Figs. 2, 3 and 4, and-to give a still plainer view of the weight U and swinging rod or wire T which carries it, Fig. has been added which is a transverse section of the shaft M and weight U immediately in front of the rod or wire T, the latter full lines except where it being shown in passes through the weight U and there All the other parts of the mechanism have beeniremoved in Fig. 7 -to give an unobstructed view of the parts shown.

As stated, the object of my invention is to control the air currents through the intake openings both into and out of the building or other place to be ventilated. To accomplish this ,result the plate N connected to the pivoted shaft M, which may be called the damper, is caused by the currents of air to oscillate between the opposite sides of the housing, and under certain conditions to close the opening F on one side, and under other conditions to close the opening I on To insure-proper closure of the-openings F and I the deflected ortions of the housing sides containing t ese openings are disposed at substantially right angles to each other and the pivot of the damper plate is so placed that it will fit closely on either deflected side containing the openings.

'l-he downward tilting tendency of the on the "pivot shaft M is usually slightly greater than that .of the weight S and when there are no currents of air entering the opening F the greater be firmly downward tendency of theplate will raise the weight S sufiiclently to permit the plate v to close the opening F, as shown in Fig. 2. When in this position the weight U has no et't'ectbecause the rod or wire T on which it is supported will turn freely on the shaft M and the weight will hang directly under it. When in this position there can be no- .iVhen a moderate current of air enters the opening .F" it' will move the plate or damper N-inward'as'shown in Fig. 3. When in this position air will-be admitted through the openings F, G and 1 into the building-- in varying amounts according to the pressure ofthe aircurrent. -When the current increases, as in the case of a storm or a very high wind, the plate N inward until it willv completely close the opening the opening into the buildings. As soon as the plate N is moved to a central position the weight U will beginto have an effect and the farther the plate is moved toward the opening I the greater its effect will be. As soon as the pressure of the air current is will be moved I I and will .efiectually prevent the. admission of strong current of air througlr lessened the weights S and U will-swing the I 7- plate outward to a central position,--and when theairpre'ssure is removed the plate N will be permitted to close the opening F against backdraft. The tilting effect of the weights S and U on the plate N can bemade less or more by adjusting them up or down on the threaded rods on which they are hung, and by this means, either a smaller or larger amount of air can 'be admitted ,into the building, as desired.

In the usual natural draft "ventilating systems, the air intake is placed in the outer wall of t 1e building near the ceiling otthe room or he apartment to be ventilated. A

preferred plan is to place the intake open especially when the space between the joistsan opening in the is enclosed to form a-flue, ceiling orthe floor above should be provided, so that "the lid or cover E the housing to make any adjustments that may be necessary in the operative me chamsm.

It is well .known that atmospheric conditions have considerable effect. on natural draft ventilating systems, Especially is this true of adverse air currentswhich in the space between the lower can be taken off i tal to systems of natural draft ventilation.

My inventionis intended to overcome these difiiculties, which it does completely, the operative mechanism being extremely sensitive and acutely res 'onsive to the variousv air currents. It is a' so simple-in construction, inexpensive in production and convenient to install in any building or other place having a system of natural draft ventilation. The modified form of my invention shown in Fig. 9, operates in substantially the same manner as the preferred form heretofore described, but the detailed construction is somewhat different; The housing is substantially the same with the exception that the deflected portions 10 and 11 are inthe upper instead of the lower part of the sides of thehousing. The shaft 12 is pivoted at each end to the ends of the housing instead ofbeing cent-rally pivoted on standards secured to the bottom of the housing. The-- damper plate is attached. below the pivot shaft 12 and operates below it instead of above it. 'Ilhe openings to be closed by the damper plate 13 are'on the under sides of the deflected portions of the sides of the housing instead of on the upper sides.

Also. the rigid weight 16 is above the pivot shaft 12'instead of below it, and the swing ing weight 17 comes in contact with the damper plate '13 when a strong current of air causes it to close the inside opening 15,

instead of coming in contact with the rigidly attached weight 16, as it does in my preferred form. Furthermore, in' closing'the openings 14 and: 15, the damper plate '13 has to be raised to a certain extent instead of lowered, as in my preferred form. In all otherrespects the construction of both forms is'substantially alike, and the operation of the damperplate 13, in controlling the admission of air into the building and preventing its escape therefrom, is, practically the same.

What I .claim is- 1. In an air control for a ventilating system, a housing. comprising an essentially rectangular hollow structure having an outer and an inner side with an opening in each side, the opening in the outer side to be placed adjoining'an air .intake opening, and a damper plate centrally pivoted in the housing so as to oscillate between the open- .ings and to be normally adapted to close the outer opening,-but also adapted when subjected to the pressure of astrong air current to close the inner opening.

2. In an air control for a ventilating system, a housing, comprising an essentially when subject tem, a

in each 0 rectangular hollow structure having). an

outerand an inner side with an openingin each side,the opening in the outer-side to 1 .be placed adjoining an air intake opening,

and a damper plate centrally pivoted in the housing so as to oscillate between the opensubjected to the pressure of a strong air current to close the inner opening, the

damper mechanism being susceptible ofad-, justment to admit varying amount of air sures. g 3; In an air control for a ventilating sys-- housing comprising an essentially to varying normal air pres-' hollow structure having an outer and an inner side with an inwardly andoutwardly and adapted under different conditions to close the opening on either side.

4. Inan air contrbl for a ventilating'system, a housing comprising an essentially hollow structure having an outer and an inner side with .an inwardly and outwardly deflected portion on each side, said outwardly deflected sides being disposed at substan 5. Ina device of the character described,-

fportion on each side, an opening the outwardly deflected portions,- and a damper plate pivoted between them side with which it is in Y a housingfor an air control mechanism -.hav-

ing inner and outersides, each of said sideshaving inwardly and, outwardly deflected portions, openings in" the outwardly deflected portions, 'a centrally pivoted damper adapted to alternately close said openings, said damper being balanced to normally close the opening on the outer side and'thus prevent the outward passage of air through said outer opening, said damper being susceptible of being moved into a central position' by a moderate current of air from the outside, and to thereby permit the inward passage of a moderate amount of air from the outside, but when the inward current of air becomes excessive the damper will be moved thereby. to close the inner open' irfig and" thus prevent the inward. passage 0 a n excessive amount of air through the inner opening. 4

6. .In a device of the character'described, a housing for an air control mechanism hav' ing inner and outer sides, each of said sides having inwardly and outwardly ;(l etlected portions, standards mounted in cent 113F031- tions on the bottom of the housing -ha'vmg bearing recesses on their uppe g'es, a

pivot shaft placed in said bearings, a plate forming a dam or having its lower edge connected to the pivot shaft, said damper being adapted to oscillate in said bearing and 1n its normal position to close the opening in the outer side ofthe housing while being susceptible of being opened by an inward current of air, and when the air current be comes excessive to close the opening in the in said bearings and a plate forming a amper having its lower edge connected to the pivot shaft, said damper being adapted to operate as shown and described.

8.. In a device of the character described, a housin for an air control mechanism, said housing eing provided with inwardly and outwardly deflected side portions, an opening .in'each of the outwardly deflected portions, sockets aflixed to central ortions of the bottom of the housing mem er, standards having bearin edges'setin said soc ets, a pivot shaft placed in said bearings and a plate forming a damper havlng its lower edge encircled around the pivot shaft and bracing clips attached to the shaft and the adjoining ortion of the plate to hold it in place on t e shaft, said damper being adapted to operate as herein set forth.

9'. In a device of the character described, a housin for an air control mechanism, said housing eing provided with inwardly and outwardly deflected side portions, an opening in'each'of the outwardly deflected portions, socketsaffixed to central nations of the bottom of the housing mem )er, standards(having bearing recesses on their upper edges set in said sockets a pivot shaft placed in said bearings and a plate forming a damper having its lower edge connected to the recesses on their upper pivot shaft, anda balancing weight arrange ment secured to the pivot shaft, said weight arrangement being adapted to operate as .set

,wardly and outwardly deflected portions,

the latter portions, each having an opening therein, standards, each having a bearmgae- 'cess on its upper edge, aflixed to the bottom of the housing, a shaft mounted in said recesses a plate forming a damper connected to the shaft and weightn'iechanism secured to the shaft in an opposite direction from the plate, the weight mechanism and the plate being adapted to be operated as and for the purpose set forth.

11. In an air control for a ventilating system, a housing having inner and outer sides, said sides being provided with inwardly and outwardly deflected portions, the latter portions each having an opening therein, standards, eaeh having a bearing recess on its upper edge, afiixed to the bottomof the boysing, a shaft mounted in said-recesses, a plate forming a damper connected to the shaft, a member afiixed to a central portion of the shaft, said member having a stem extended in the opposite direction from the plate, and a weight adjustably secured to said stem, as and for the purpose set forth.

12. In an air control for a ventilating system, a housing having inner and outersides, said sides being provided with inwardly and outwardly deflecting portions, the latter portions each having an opening therein, standards, each having a bearing recess on its upper edge, ailixed to the bottom of the housing, a shaft mounted in said recesses a plate forming a damper connected to the shaft, a pair of members aflixed to a central portion of the shaft each having a, stem extended from the shaft in a direction substantially opposite from the plate, one of said members being rigidly secured to the) shaft and the other secured rotatably, its stem being set over to one side of the shaft, and a pair of weights adju'stably secured to said stems, as and for the purpose set forth.

In testimony whereof I afiix my signature.

JAMES L. STRAHAN.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2599075 *Jan 3, 1949Jun 3, 1952Donald H StroupClosure element for air ducts
US2986904 *Sep 4, 1959Jun 6, 1961Carl C WilliamsonHeat pump space heating system
US3111301 *Dec 4, 1961Nov 19, 1963Margaret M MebusAnti-back draft damper
US3138086 *Dec 18, 1961Jun 23, 1964Automatic Poultry Feeder CompaVentilator
US3706271 *Feb 12, 1971Dec 19, 1972Mieczkowski Robert WInlet control
US4667581 *Dec 23, 1985May 26, 1987Aluminum Company Of AmericaWind responsive soffit ventilator
US4759272 *Jun 3, 1986Jul 26, 1988Michel ZaniewskiVentilator
US5080005 *Jan 9, 1991Jan 14, 1992Leonard W. SuroffPassive building vents
US5669815 *Apr 26, 1996Sep 23, 1997Martin Industries, Inc.Barometric damper with magnetic latch
US6454247 *Dec 7, 2000Sep 24, 2002Ff Seeley Nominees Pty LtdAnti-backdraft shutter assembly for an axial flow fan
US6475078 *Oct 9, 2001Nov 5, 2002Norb BorcherdingAir ventilating device
DE19610884C3 *Mar 20, 1996Jul 31, 2003Fassadensystemlueftung Gmbh &Belüftungssystem für die Räume von Gebäuden
WO1992012388A1 *Dec 17, 1991Jul 10, 1992Stanley KoltPassive building vents
Classifications
U.S. Classification454/259
International ClassificationF24F11/04
Cooperative ClassificationF24F11/043
European ClassificationF24F11/04D