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Publication numberUS1623791 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 5, 1927
Filing dateApr 26, 1926
Priority dateApr 26, 1926
Publication numberUS 1623791 A, US 1623791A, US-A-1623791, US1623791 A, US1623791A
InventorsKalil Kara-Joseph
Original AssigneeKalil Kara-Joseph
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method of renovating clothing
US 1623791 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Patented A r. 5, 1927.

KALIL KABA-JOSEPHyOF PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA.

mrrnon or movarme cno'rmo.

1T0 Drawing.

My invention'relates to the renovating of clothing, more particularly woolen clothing,

and one object. of my invention is to restore to the clothing, after'a cleaning operation, (or operations) the color and lustre of the original fabric.

A further object of my inventlon is to provide an improved process of cleaning and renovating woolen clothing whereby, after complete cleansing has been effected, the color and lustre possessed by the fabric of which such clothing is madeis completely restored.

The usual practice in the cleansin of garments, woolen clothing, and the' li e, is to wash them in a solution of son and water, a treatment which may prece e or follow a bath in gasoline or other solvent; such hydrocarbon bath being designed toremove larger grease spots or those of longer standing, or the cleansing operation may be conducted solely with a hydrocarbon solvent;

gasoline being the solvent most frequently employed.

In all prior methods of cleaning, whether the washing operation referred to, or the so-called method or process of dry-cleaning, which has been employed for many years the appearance and color of the fabric 0 the clothin has been deadened by such washing and/or cleaning operation, and the application and subsequent removal of the hydrocarbon spirit or solvent employed, and clothing cleaned by such methods never resents the appearance of the original fa ric.

I have noted this condition and defect for many years and as a result of many experiments whiclr'I have carried on the method of renovating clothing, articu arly woolen clothing, formin the su ject of m invention has been devefiiped and perfect In ca g out my improved process or method 0 renovating clothing, the garments are preferably washed in a solution of a mild or neutral soap and water to remove all dirtand stains, and following this washin operation, the garments are carefull dried and, if desired, any portions which have vgleveloped'undue folds and creases may be Following the drying of the clot ing after the washing operation, I place them in a bath of hydrocarbon solvent, usually gasoline, where and accompanying dirt not removed by the washing-operation, and any traces of. the

y all grease spots- Application fled April is, 1m. Serial Io. 10am,

soapy solution, may be completely removed; The excess gasoline or other -solvent body employed is then removed and the garment allowed to dryand free itself of all traces ofthe gasoline and/or other cleaning spirit.

I then prepare a bath for the reception of the washed and dried garments, which bath is made up of gasoline or other suitable solvent and lanolin, (Wool oil) in-the proportion of approximately one ounce of lanolin to one quart of gasoline or othersolvent; both ingredients bein employed in such quantities as to provi e a bath suflicient in volume to treat the garments thoroughl and insure that all parts of the same sha-l receive this solution in ual proportions. The lanolin must be comp etely in solution in the gasoline or other hydrocarbon solvent employed, a solution preferabl effected in the presence of heat, and the mixture should be entirely homogenous so that all rtions of the same contain the respective mgredients'in the proportions indicated.

In the bath so pre ared, the garments to be treated, are di'ppe and after dippin for. the desired length 0 time, they sho d be squeezed for the excess solution an if desired, they may be dipped a in, so as to insure an even application 0 the treating bath conta' i g the lanolin, and complete permeation. of t -s me urpose of removing the to all parts of the garment' After his treatment has been thoroughly applied, the garments are removed from the bath, squeezed, 1f 0'. to remove GXCGSS 0f the treating liquid, and then hung up to dry; preferabl being aired so as to remove alltraces of drgcvailrbonhsolvefil h en t orou t e rments ma be pressed in the u suai manne and in and final conditionthey will have the color and or due to the use of the hy- 4 lustre of the original fabric and the appearance of a new garment rather than one that has been merelycleaned in the old manner. An important feature of m improved method or process resides in tlie fact that when woolen clothing is treated inaccordance therewith, it is water resistant; that is to say, it will shed water and except under conditions of greatest stress, is substantially water roof.

- While I have referred articularly to the treatment of woolen clot ing, it is obvious that hangings, curtains, and other woolen and with the same result.

I claim:

1. The method or process of renovating clothing, which comprises washing the same in an aqueous solution of soap to remove stains and dirt, dipping such washed clothing in aybath consisting of a hydrocarbon solvent to remove grease spots, and finally treating such clothing with a non-aqueous solution containing lanolin.

2. The method or process of renovating clothing, which comprises washing the same in a solution of soap and water, treating such washed clothing with a hydrocarbon solvent, drying such clothing, and finally treating the same in a bath consisting of a solution of lanolin and a hydrocarbon sol- Vent.

3. The method or process of renovating woolen clothing, which comprises washing the same in a solution of a neutral soap and hot water to remove dirt and stains, treating such washed clothing with a hydrocarbon solvent to remove grease spots and insure final removal of dirt accompanying such grease spots, and then treating such clothing in a bath comprising a non-aqueous solution containing lanolin.

4. The method or process of renovating woolen clothing, which comprises washing the same in a solution of a neutral soap and hot water to remove dirt and stains, drying such clothing, treating such washed clothing with a hydrocarbon solvent to remove greasespots and insure final removal of dirt accompany- I ing such grease spots, removing such solvent the washing operation, removing suchsolvent and any foreign material accompanying the same, and then dipping the same ina bath comprisin a solution of lanolin and a hydrocarbon solvent.

(5. The method or process of renovating woolen clothing, which comprises washing the same in a solution of a neutral soap and hot water to remove dirt and stains, drying the same, treating such washed clothing with a hydrocarbon solvent to remove grease spots and insure final removal of dirt accoinpanying such grease spots and any soapy residue from the washing operation, removing such solvent and any foreign material accompanying the same, substantially drying out the treated clothing, then dipping the same in a bath comprising a solution of lanolin and a hydrocarbon solvent, and finally drying and pressing such renovated clothing.

In witness whereof I have signed lllis specification.

KALIL KARA-JOSEPH.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2717824 *Sep 18, 1951Sep 13, 1955Avery Floyd NMethod for removing water-soluble stains in dry cleaning garments
US2832518 *Sep 29, 1953Apr 29, 1958DoyleProcess of applying lanolin finish to nylon hosiery and heat setting the hosiery andproducts produced therefrom
US7157018Jul 8, 2004Jan 2, 2007Scheidler Karl JAntifading benzotriazole compound, antisoilant fluorocarbon, waterproof silicone, and mineral spirits; colorfastness, photostability, odorless
US7824566Dec 4, 2006Nov 2, 2010Scheidler Karl JMethods and compositions for improving light-fade resistance and soil repellency of textiles and leathers
Classifications
U.S. Classification8/137, 8/142, 252/8.91
International ClassificationD06L1/00, D06L1/22
Cooperative ClassificationD06L1/22
European ClassificationD06L1/22