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Publication numberUS1624051 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 12, 1927
Filing dateMay 15, 1926
Priority dateMay 15, 1926
Publication numberUS 1624051 A, US 1624051A, US-A-1624051, US1624051 A, US1624051A
InventorsHansen Augie L
Original AssigneeHansen Mfg Co A L
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Lock and method of manufacture
US 1624051 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

1,624,051 Ap 1927' A. L. HANSEN LOCK AND METHOD OF MANUFACTURE Filed May 15, 1926 Patented Apr. 12, 1927.

UNITED STATES I 1,624,051 PATENT OFFICE.

A'UGIE L. HANSEN, OF CHICAGO, ILLINOIS, ASSIGNOR TO A. L. HANSEN MFG. 430., OF CHICAGO. ILLINOIS, A CORPORATION OF ILLINOIS.

LOCK AND METHOD OF MANUFAOTUBE.

Application filed Kay 15, 1926. Serial No. 109,236.

This invention relates to improvements in construction for looks and the like forms of hardware coming within the class of auto mobile and house door locks, window latches and the like. To identify the subject matter of the present invention with even greater particularity, it relates to a method for making and assemblin a handle or other moving part and a bus ing, the latter preferably being stamped from sheet metal.

It has long been the common practise to manufacture the moving or operating parts of the more inexpensive types of door locks of cast metal or drop forgings, as for instance the handles having cylindric bearing portions or bushings which rotate within the lock casing and provided with square bores therethrough to receive the square shank of an outside door handle. In some cases, however, a locking member is found integral with the bushing instead of a handle, their variations in practise depending on the particular type of lock being made. In all cases however the casting or forging of the movin parts of a lock, from either steel or ma leable iron, the square opening is either cored or drilled and then broached out, but neither method is satisfactory since accuracy is largely dependent upon the care and skill of the pattern maker or machinist. Moreover, the ends of the bushing must be accurately machined to form its bearings in the lock-casing and this requires machine work, which adds considerably to the cost of production.

The object of the present invention is to eliminate all casting, forging and machining operations, and to stamp the parts from sheet metal blanks, and to form and assemble the same complete by punch press operations.

A typical operation is herein disclosed in the making of a lock handle, such as would be used in a lock for the cab door of a commercial vehicle.

Figures 1 and 2 are views of the complete handle in elevation as viewed from different angles.

Figure 3 is a view in ,elevation of the handle stamping before ready to receive the bushing.

Figure 4 is a perspective view of the bushing blank.

Figure 5 is a perspective view of the blank after the first forming operation.

Figure 6 is a view of the bushing bent into final shape.

Figure 7 is a view of bushing with one end swaged preparatory to inserting it in the handle.

The handle (Figures 1 and 2) embodying the invention consists of the two parts or stampings, namely, a lever 1, and the square bushing 2 both of sheet metal.

As shown in Figure 3, the lever 1 is a simple form of sheet metal stamping, having a curved shank 1, an enlarged portion 1" at one end ofi'set at 90 to the shank to form the handle proper, and at the other end with a rounded enlargement 1 having a part round and part square hole 1 punched therein. The handle in this form 1s ready to have the bushing 2 assembled.

The formation of the bushing 2 consists of a series of stamping and forming operations successively disclosed in Figures 4 to 7. The operation is to stamp out the blanks 2* (Figure 4) from which the bushings are formed.= These blanks are generally rectangular in shape their length being substantially twice their width. By preference the longer edges are slightly convex, and the shorter or end edges concave, for reasons which will presently appear. These blanks are stamped from sheet metal by a punch l press with suitable blanking dies.

The second operation is the bending or drawing the blank into the U-shape piece 2 (Figure 5) this being also a punch press operation. In the drawing of the metal into its U-form, a certain amount of distortion takes place hence by forming the blanks with concave and convex edgesthese same edges assume straight lines after the metal is drawn in the forming operation.

The third operation is bending of the end portions of the U-shaped piece 2 at right angles and toward each other into abutting contact, thus forming a tubular piece 2" substantially square in section, but with rounded corners, and having a square opening therethrough, finished to the predetermine size of the square shank of the handle to be inserted therethr'ough. The outside dimensions of the bushing in this form, while approximately fitting the opening 1 in the lever 1, may or may not be inserted with a press fit without an additional operation.

In the present disclosure the bushing is preferably subjected to a furthenoperation,

which is that of swaging one end, between suitable dies, acting end-wise of the bushing to cut or strip the metal along the corner edges and thus build it up in the form of lugs 3, and at the same time reducing the diameter of the bushing throughout one end portion and at the same time forming lugs 3, at each corner, and at the base of the swaged portion.

The final operation is that of assembling the bushing and the handle, the reduced end portion being inserted into the opening 1 of the lever to the limit permitted by the lugs 3, and with a portion of the bushing pro jecting beyond the opposite side of the handle. as shown in Figure 1.

When thus assembled, the bushing is subjected to another swaging operation, by which both ends of the bushing are upset for a distance of approximately a of an inch. Two results are accomplished by this operation; first, end bearings are formed, these being practically round or at least approach a circle sufficiently to provide suitable bearings for the bushing in the lock casing, and secondly, the metal which is displaced in forming the end bearings takes the form of lugs 4-.4, those on the opposite side of the handle from the lugs 3, acting to lock the parts permanently together by securing the handle between the initial set of lugs 3 and the final set 4. This completes the handle and it is then ready for as:embly in the lock casing or other mechanism in which it is to be used.

As previously suggested the first swaging operation may be omitted entirely. This 1 practise would be followed Where the bushmg receiving end of the handle is practically the same length as the bushing itself, or where the bushing is to be assembled with two or more locking parts, so that only the end portions of the bushing protrude. In such case, the final operation of swaging the ends to form the end bearings would at the same time lock the bushing in place by the sets of lugs which are simultaneously formed.

As already pointed out the advantages of the construction and method of manufacture for lock parts and the like resides in the elimination of all cast or forged parts, and

the resulting low cost and increased volume of production that is allowed. Moreover, this method promotes accuracy and standardization of the product, inasmuch as machine work is entirely done away with and all parts are as uniform and as accurately dimensioned as the dies which form them.

Manifestly the same method may be used in the manufacture of devices other than looks or arts thereof, and therefore I do not wish to e limited in its applications to the particular disclosure herein made.

I claim:

1. A part for looks or the like, comprising a member having an opening therethrough and a metal bushing inserted in said opening and having surface portions of the metal on opposite sides of sald member upset to secure the bushing against displacement in said member.

2. A part for locks or the like, comprising a member having an opening therethrough and a bushing fitting in said opening and consisting of a blank of sheet metal bent into tubular form and having its ends swaged to form lugs engaging opposite sides of said member.

3. A part for locks and the like comprising a sheet metal member, and a bushing adapted to be inserted in an open in said member with its end portions projecting on opposite sides and consisting of a rectan ular blank of sheet metal bent into tubu ar form and having lugs swaged from the projecting end portions to engage the opposite sides of said member.

4. A part for locks and the like, comprising a sheet metal lever having an opening therethrough, and a bushing, consisting of a sheet metal blank bent into tubular form and inserted through said opening with its ends projecting, and provided at its ends with reduced bearing portions and locking lugs adjacent said bearing portions.

5. A partfor locks and the like, comprising a sheet metal lever having an opening therethrough, and a bushing, consisting of a blank of sheet metal bent into tubular form and inserted through said opening with its ends projecting, and provided at its ends with swaged bearing surfaces and lugs formed by the metal displaced in the swaging of said bearings.

6. A part for locks or the like, comprising a lever having an aperture therein, and a bushing therefor, consisting of a blank of sheet metal bent in tubular form of substantially square section, and provided with swaged lugs adjacent one end adapted to engage one side of said handle, a swaged bearing portion at the opposite end and lugs adjacent said bearing portion and adapted to engage the opposite side of said handle.

7. A part for looks or the like, comprising a lever, having an aperture therein and a. bushing therefor, consisting of a sheet metal blank bent in tubular form of square section, and adapted to fit within said aperture, said bushing having its ends swaged to form lugs engagin said lever around said aperture, and su stantially circular end bearings of reduced diameter beyond said lugs. 8. A method of forming bushings for the operatin parts of locks and the like, consisting o stamping rectangular blanks from sheet metal, bending said blanks into tubusides thereof, and

lar form, inserting the bushing through an aperture in the part to carry the bushing, and swaging the metal at the ends of the bushing.

9. A method of formin bushings for the moving parts of locks an the like, consisting 0 stam in rectan lar blanks from sheet metal, Eem iing sai blanks into tubular form, inserting the bushing through an aperture in the part to carry the bushing and swaging the metal at the ends of the bushing to form end bearings, and to lock said bushing and part together.

10. A method of forming bushings for the movin parts of locks and the like, consisting 0 stamping rectangular blanks from sheet metal, bending said blanks into tubular pieces of square section, inserting said bushings through an aperture in the part to carry the bushing, and swaging the metal at the corners of the projecting ends of the bushing to simultaneously form locking lugs and substantially circular end bearings.

11. A method for forming the moving parts of locks and the like, consisting of stamping levers from sheet metal with substantially square apertures therein, stamping rectangular pieces of square section from sheet metal, bendin said pieces into tubular. form, inserting the tubular pieces through the apertures in said levers with their end portions projecting from opposite swaging the projecting ends of said tubu ar pieces to simultaneously form reduced end bearings, and to displace the metal endwise and laterally to lock said tubular pieces and levers together.

12. A method for forming a lock handle or the like of sheet metal consisting of providing a handle blank with an aperture at one end, formin a rectangular bushing blank, bending t e blank into a tubular iece of substantially square section, inserting said piece through the aperture in said handle, with its ends projectng, and swaging the ends of said bushi: lg to simultaneously form substantially circular end bearings and to upset the metal on opposite sides of said aperture.

13. A method for forming a lock handle or the like of sheet metal, consisting of providing a handle blank, punching an aperture in said handle blank, forming a rectangular bushing blank, drawing the blank into a tubular piece of substantially square section, inserting said piece through said aperture in said handle blank with its ends projecting, and swagin the ends of said bushing to simultaneously orm substantially circular end bearings and to upset the metal on opposite, sides of said handle blank.

14. A method for forming alock handle or the like of sheet metal, consisting of providing a handle blank with a substantially square a erture stampin forming a rectangular ushing blank, rawing said blank into a tubular piece of square section, inserting said bushing through said aperture and subjecting the ends of the blank to a swaging aperture whereby the metal at the corners are displaced to form end bearings of reduced end bearing surfaces, the displaced metal being upset laterally to form lugs on opposite sides of said handle.

15. A method forv forming a lock handle or the like of sheet metal, consisting of providing a handle blank with a substantially square aperture, forming a rectangular bushing blank, bending the blank into a tubular piece of substantially square section, swaging one end portion of the bushing to form a reducedfportion adapted to pass through and beyond said aperture and to form lugs ada ted to limit the passage of said bus ing t rough said aperture, and finally swaging both ends of the bushing to form reduced end bearings and to form another series of lugs bearing against the face of the handle opposite the first formed lugs.

Signed at Chicago, 111., this 12th day of,

May, 1926.

AUGIE L. HANSEN.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2737363 *Jan 25, 1950Mar 6, 1956Horst Paul VShoring clamp
US2942909 *Oct 1, 1957Jun 28, 1960Marston ChaseDoor latch lever
US3012800 *Jun 23, 1959Dec 12, 1961Gen ElectricTrip mechanism
US8002777Mar 20, 2008Aug 23, 2011Biomet Manufacturing Corp.Instrumentation and method for implanting a curved stem tibial tray
US20080183177 *Mar 20, 2008Jul 31, 2008Biomet Manufacturing Corp.Instrumentation And Method For Implanting A Curved Stem Tibial Tray
US20090062806 *Nov 6, 2003Mar 5, 2009Scott James WTibial preparation apparatus and method
USD747171 *May 27, 2014Jan 12, 2016Apexoem IncHandle for doors and covers
Classifications
U.S. Classification403/247, 16/110.1, 292/347, 76/114, 29/523
International ClassificationE05B1/06, E05B1/00
Cooperative ClassificationE05B1/06
European ClassificationE05B1/06