Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS1626069 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 26, 1927
Filing dateNov 5, 1925
Priority dateNov 5, 1925
Publication numberUS 1626069 A, US 1626069A, US-A-1626069, US1626069 A, US1626069A
InventorsBeech Alexander C
Original AssigneeKroehler Mfg Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Reclining chair
US 1626069 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

A BEECH ECLINING; CHAIR April 26, 1927,

Filed Novl 5, 1925 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 April 26,1927. 6 69 A. C. BEECH RECLINING CHAIR Filed Nov. '5, 1925 2 Shasta-Sheet 2 Patented Apr. 26, 1927.

UNITE!) STATES PATENT OFFICE.

ALEXANDER C. BEECH, OF CHICAGO, ILLINOIS, ASSIGNOR TO KROEHLER MFG. 00., OF NAPERVILLE, ILLINOIS, CORPORATION OF ILLINOIS.

RECLINING CHAIR.

Application filed November 5, 1925. Serial No. 66,899.

This invention relates to improvements in reclining chairs, and more particularly to chairs in which the seat and back portion are supported by trunnions in the chair frame, these trunnions being so positioned with relation to the weight supported so that the seat may be tilted to any desired position by shifting the position of the body in the chair.

Among the objects of the invention is to provide an improved constructionfor reclining chairs such as disclosed in my previous application, filed May 14, 1924, Serial No. 713,115.

A further object of the invention is to provide an extensible leg and foot rest which is automatically extended when the chair is tilted to a reclining position and retracted when the chair is brought into upright position.

In the accompanying drawings I have illustrated a preferred embodiment of the invention, wherein:

Figure l is a view in front elevation of the chair with portions broken away and shown in section to disclose the trunnions;

Figure 2 is a detailed view in vertical section taken on line 2-2 of Figure 1;

Figure 3 is a perspective view of a portion of one arm of the chair frame showing one of the trunnion members fixed thereto;

Figure 4 is a perspective view of one side of the seat frame showing a complementary trunnion member;

Figure 5 is a view in vertical section through the chair showing the foot rest operating mechanism in normal position; and

Figure 6 is a similar view of the chair in titlted position showing the leg rest extended.

As a preferable embodiment of my invention I have disclosed a reclining chair of the lounge type constructed in ample proportions and preferably overstufied with leather or some suitable fabric. However, it is understood that the novel features of construction may be incorporated in various styles of chairs, as, for instance, for porch or outside use.

Vithout confining the invention to any particular chair construction, the same comprises in general the chair frame A, consisting of the legs 1 and side arms 2, together with the other parts which are relatively stationary, and a tiltable seat portion B, consisting of the seat 3 and back l, together with such parts as carried thereby. As is customary in chair construction, the two legs on each side of the chair, together with the arms, form unitary sections which are joined together by means of transverse cross members 5 to complete the chair frame. The seat consists of a rectangular frame 3 supporting an overstuffed spring cushion 3", the back at being of a similar construction with the frame 4 completely concealed by the overstuffing 49. At the junction of the seat and back frames on opposite sides thereof are two side frame members 6-6 which extend above the seat 3 and forwardly of the back 4, as shown in Figure 2. These side frame members lie close to the inner sides of the arms 2, the latter being shaped so that they extend over inwardly above the upper edges of the side frame members, as shown in Figures 1 and 3.

Secured to the inner face of the arms 22 are circular bearing or trunnion members 7 projecting inwardly, the same being preferably made in the form of metallic rings having internal flanges 7 at one end by which the rings are fixed in place by screws. Corresponding to the trunnion members 7 on the arms are complementary trunnion members 8 fixed to the side'frame members 6, the latter being of the same construction,

but with their internal diameters substantially equal to the external diameters of the trunnion members 7. The tilting seat portion is thus suspended on the chair frame by the telescopic bearing engagement of the trunnion members 8 upon the internal trunnion members 7, the annular bearing sur faces thereof turning on each other as the seat is tilted backwardly or forwardly.

As a means for positively limiting the rearward tilting of the seat portion B, a radially disposed block 9 is mounted on the inner face of the seat, and within the trunnion member 8 carried thereby, and a fixed pawl 10 is secured centrally of the trunnion member 7 carried by the chair frame; The block and pawl are so disposed withrespect to the axis of rotation of the trunnion members as to come into contact when the seat has been tilted back to say 45, thus preventing further movement.

In designing the chair, it is essential that the trunnions be properly located with respect to the position of the body of the person sitting in the chair, and of equal importance is the diameter of the trunnions and the area of the bearing surface, since these factors determine the amount of friction which is exerted to hold the seat in the desired position.

Considering first the location of the trunnions, it is to be observed that their centers are well above the seat frame and forwardly of the-back, so that the approximate center of gravity of the combined weight of the seat and the body of the occupant .is C()11 siderably below and substantially in a vertical line with the centers of the trunnions. It follows, therefore, that even in the absence of friction, the seat and the weight of the sitter is suspended from the trunnions, and would remain in equilibrium, providing the weight was not shifted. However, by reason of the friction acting at the trunnion's, the seat is sufficiently stable, so that a slight physical effort, by pushing or pulling on the arms of the chair, combined with a shifting of the weight of the body, will tilt the seat forwardly or bachwardiy to the desired angle, whereupon the seat remains at that angle, so long the body is in repose. In other words, the weight of the occupant in no position of the seatso greatly overbalances the friction as to cause a sudden tilting of the seat, or anv sense of insecurity, inasmuch as some ph l effort must accompany the shifting of the weight of the body in order to swing the seat.

As before suggested, the degree of friction present is an important factor, and for this reason, the trunnions are relatively large in diameter, as, for instance, 10 or 12 inches, which would not be unusual in a large chair. However, the diameter of the trunnions, as well as the width of the surfaces in contact, will vary in different sizes of cliuirs--all of which factors can be readily determined by the designer. it is to be observed means, frictional or otherwise, is rcqu lock the seat in either re lined or upii." T. position, inasmuch this taken care of by the proper distribution of the weight, as sisted by the ever present friction which permits the sitter to assume any desired position with little or no exertion, other than forcing the body rearwz-irdly or leaning forwardly, as the case may be.

As an additional and eoin 'ilemcntary feature of the tiltable seat. it is preferred. to afford additional comfort in the form of an adjustable or extensible leg at the front of the seat. As clearly shown in Figures 5 and 6-, this leg rest or support consists of two hinged together sections 11 and 12 which extend downwardly from the forward edge of the seat, below the seat frame. The upper section 11 is hinged directly to the front of the seat frame 3 by means of hinges 13 and extends substantially half way to tl e floor in the upright position of the chair, as shown in Figure 5. The upper section serves as a depending apron, such as ordinarily found in chairs of this type and so far as its appearance is concerned, might well. be regarded as a-fiXed part of the chair. The lower section 12 is hinged to the lower edge of the section 11 by means of hinges 1 1 and in the upri rht position of the chair, as shown in Figure 5, is swung upwardly and rearwardly at right angles to the upper sec-- tion and thus is practically concealed from View, so as not to present an unsightly appearance when the chair is uprightand the legrest not in use.

Means are provided which automatically extend the two sections 11 and 12 of the leg rest when the chair is tilted back. This mechanism consists of links and levers secured to the underside-of the seat frame and consisting of parts follows: Extending downwardly from each side of the seat frame 3 are pairs of braces 1515, which meet above the floor and pivotally support one end of a rod 16, extending forwardly and upwardly and teri'ninating immediately behind the front edge of the seat frame The forward end of this bar is secured by and rides in a slot formed in an upright guide member 17 secured to a. cross-bar 18 of the chair frame, said slot serving to guide and direct the movement of the bar 16. At the forward end of the bar 16 is a link 18 pivotally connected with the lower section 12 of the leg rest intermediate its top and bottom edges by means of an eye 20. It will be noted that the link is bent intermediate its ends so as to provide a short upper end portion, which extends vertical and parallel to the upper section 11 in the u n'ight position of the chair (Figure 5), and a longer portion at an a th o, thus clearing the cross l" 18. a 1d rearwardly to the lowe i rest, which is drawn up i tion.

As will be seen from Figure 5, the bar 16 and link 19 are so positioned that the upper hinged section 11 assumes a vertical position and the lower section 12 a horizontal position. As the chair seat is tilted backivardly the bar 16 is extended forwardly, thereby swinging the upper section 11 outwardly from the forward edge of the seat at an angle of substantially 30 to its normal position, whereas the lower section 11 is simultaneously swung downwardly and, forwardly into the plane of the upper section 11. In this way the leg rest is not only extended to a positionto afford comfort in the reclining position, but is also lengthened so that the feet, as well as the legs, may be supported.

By virtue of the construction which permits the chair to be tilted to a reclining position without the use of mechanical means and further by the presence of a leg rest which is automatically extended when needed, a chair is constructed which from all appearances is of a solid or nonadjustable construction, but which, as a matter of fact, is readily adjusted, and without the presence of any article of furniture. In short, the chair is wholly automatic in its action and operative by the weight of the occupant.

I claim:

1. A reclining chair comprising a chair frame, a seat supported in said frame by means of trunnions located above said seat and comprising curvilinear bearing members, concentric with the axis of said trunnions and of a radius to exert a predetermined degree of frictional resistance against the movement of said seaton said trunnions, a leg rest hinged to said seat portion, and means operating automatically in the tilt ing of said seat to swing said leg rest to a predetermined position.

2. A reclining chair comprising a chair frame, a seat portion, tilt-ably mounted in said chair frame and through the medium of trunnions, comprising pairs of complementary circular bearing members mounted on said seat, and on said frame, and located a predetermined distance above the center of gravity of the seat and a leg rest hinged to said seat, and comprising a hinged section adapted to be folded beneath the seat in its upright position, and means operating automatically in the backward tilting of the seat to swing said hinged section clownwardly and forwardly into operative position into the plane of the other section.

3. A reclining chair comprising a relatively stationary chair frame, and a seat tiltably suspended on trunnions mounted on said chair frame, and above the center of gravity of the combined weight of the chair seat and occupant, a leg rest hinged to the front of said seat and depending therefrom,

and a linkage operatively connected with said seat and said leg rest, whereby in the tilting of said seat, the same is moved into and out of operative position.

t. A reclining chair comprising a chair frame, a seat supported in said frame by means of trunnions located above said seat and comprising curvilinear bearing members, adapted to exert a predetermined degree of frictional resistance against the movement of said seat on said trunnions, a sectional leg resthinged to said seat portion, an endwise shiftable' rod mounted beneath said seat and connected at one end with said leg rest and an arm depending from said seat and connected with the other end of said rod whereby said leg rest is automatically shifted into and out of operative position in the tilting of said seat.

5. A reclining chair comprising a chair frame, a seattiltably mounted on said chair frame and through the medium of trunnions, comprising pairs of complementary circular bearing members mounted on said seat, and on said frame, and located a predetermined distance above the center of gravity of the combined Weight of the seat and a leg rest hinged to said seat, and means comprising a hinged section adapted to be folded. underneath the seat in the upright position thereof, and endwise shiftable rod mounted beneath said seat, an arm depending from said seat and connected with the rear end of said rod, and a link connecting the forward end of said rod with said hinged section, whereby in the backward tilting of said seat, said hinged section is moved into the plane of the remaining portion of the leg rest and the whole swung outwardly at a predetermined angle to said seat.

6. A reclining chair comprising a frame. a seat having a portion adapted to be tilted into a reclining position, an extensible leg rest hinged to the front of said seat, links connecting said leg restwith the tilting portion of said seat and a member mounted on said frame and engaging one of said links to swing said leg rest into and out of extended position.

7. A reclining chair comprising a frame, a tiltable seat, a leg rest hinged to the front of said seat, a bar pivotally connected at one end to said seat and extending toward said leg rest, a guide member mounted on said frame and engaging said bar, and a link connecting the free end of said bar with said leg rest.

8. A reclining chair comprising a frame, a seat adapted to be tilted with its back in reclining position, a leg rest hinged to the front of said seat and adapted to be folded under said seat, links connecting said leg rest with said seat, and means mounted on said frame and engaging said links to effect the extension and retraction of said leg rest in the tilting of said seat into and from a reclining position.

9. A reclining chair comprising a frame, a seat adapted to be adjusted into and out of areclining position, a leg rest having a section hinged to the front of said seat to extend downwardly therefrom, and a section hinged to said first mentioned section to project rearwar'dly beneath said seat, and means operatively connecting said seat with said last mentioned section whereby the same is swung into the plane of said first mentioned section, and both are extended forwardly when said seat is tilted into a reclining posi tion.

10. A reclining chair comprising a frame, a seat adapted to be tilted into reclining position, a leg rest hinged at the front of said seat and consisting of an upper and a lower section hinged together, said lower sections being adapted to be folded under said seat does when the same is in upright position, a link connected at one end with said seat, means mounted on said frame for guiding said link in an endwise direction, and a link connecting the free end of said first mentioned link with said lower section of said leg rest.

Signed at Chicago, this 7th day of October, 1925.

ALEXANDER G. BEECH.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2663357 *Apr 23, 1952Dec 22, 1953Berkline CorpReclining chair
US2664942 *Dec 2, 1952Jan 5, 1954Kenmar Mfg CompanyAdjustable chair with leg supporting platform
US2719572 *Mar 28, 1952Oct 4, 1955Bunting Glider CompanyReclining chair construction
US2781822 *Dec 19, 1952Feb 19, 1957Krikorian Albert PChair
US2986201 *Oct 2, 1958May 30, 1961Bee And Gee Mfg Co IncChair having movable leg-rest section
US3001817 *Feb 14, 1958Sep 26, 1961Anton LorenzLeg-rest and actuating mechanism
US3083996 *Jun 15, 1959Apr 2, 1963Nat Furniture Mfg Co IncReclining chair
US5388886 *Aug 9, 1993Feb 14, 1995La-Z-Boy Chair Co.Dual leg rest assembly
US5582457 *Oct 12, 1994Dec 10, 1996La-Z-Boy Chair CompanyDual leg rest assembly
US5845961 *Jun 7, 1996Dec 8, 1998La-Z-Boy IncorporatedDual leg rest assembly having selectable height ottoman
EP0509823A1 *Apr 16, 1992Oct 21, 1992La-Z-Boy Chair CompanyChaise longue reclining chair
Classifications
U.S. Classification297/75, 297/327, 297/88
International ClassificationA47C1/034, A47C1/031
Cooperative ClassificationA47C1/0342
European ClassificationA47C1/034F