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Publication numberUS1626948 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 3, 1927
Filing dateNov 16, 1921
Priority dateNov 16, 1921
Publication numberUS 1626948 A, US 1626948A, US-A-1626948, US1626948 A, US1626948A
InventorsGeorge Manierre
Original AssigneeGeorge Manierre
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Unloader for railroad cars
US 1626948 A
Abstract  available in
Images(9)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

May 3,1927.

G. MANIERRE UNLOADER FOR RAILROAD CARS Original Filed Nov.16. 1 921 9 Sheets-Sheet .1

1927. l 626 948 May a. MANIERRE UNLQADER FOR RAILROAD CARS Original Filed Nov.l6. 1921 9 Sheets- Sheet 2 May 3, 1927. 1,626,948

G. MANIERRE UNLOADER FOR RAILROAD CARS Original Filed Nov.l6. 1921 9 Sheets-Sheet 3 r Imbrlt? eflge f anzlerre May G. M'ANIERRE UNLOADER FOR RAILROAD CARS Original Filed Nov .16. 1921 9 Sheets-Sheet 4 M %WM SN was,

May 3 1927. I 1,626,948

. G. MANIERRE UNLOADER FOR RAILROAD CARS Original Filqd Nov.l6. 1921 9 Sheets- 5m 5 N Irufe mien? QShQets-Sheet 7 [I r I i I I QNN RN G MANIERRE UNLOADBR FOR RAILROAD CARS Original Filed Nov.16. 1921 x w v 1 Q May 3 1927.

May 3, 1927.

G. MANIERRE URLOADER FOR RAILROAD CARS Original Filed Nov.16. 1921 9 Sheets-Sheet 9 BMS W w \NN QWKN wg g -- 0 Ill Aw? b a W Q? @N \WX AW Patented May 3, 1927.

PATENT O'F-FICE.

GEORGE MANIERRE, OF MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN.

UNLOADER FOR RAILROAD CARS.

Application filed November 16, 1921, Serial No. 515,578. Renewed 0et0ber'6, 1926.

This invention relates to improvements in unloading devices for railroad cars.

It is an object of the invention to provide a device of his character which maybe readily moved on tracks to any position from which it can be advanced into or removed "from the car.

Another object of the invention is to provide a device of this character by means of which bulk material stored in the car may be shifted toward the discharge opening of the car without requiring the attendance of laborers entering the car.

The invention also contemplates to provide an. unloader in which a scraper or hoe is rigidly secured to one of a plurality of telescoping boom sections, which sections in their entirety form a structure which is adapted to be turned in any direction and which is thereby adapted to bring the scraper into operative position in any part of the car desir d. I

It is also an object of the invention to provide in a device of this character manually operable means for placing the unloader into a predetermined position in the car and for operating a turntable which terms a part of the unloader to direct the boom structure to any point in the interior of the car. I I

In addition to these manually operable means for placing the unloader at any operative position within the car, motor driven devices are provided which complete the positioning of the unloader.

lVith these and nany other objects in view an embodiment of the invention is illustrated in the accompanying drawing and is described in the following specification:

Fig. 1 is a side elevation of the device introduced into a car, the car being partly shown in section;

Fig. 2 a top plan view of the device in the interior of a car, with the car shown in section; f i

.Fig. 3 is an end elevation of the device also with the car shown in section;

Fig. 4 is a side elevation and partly sectional view of the unloader;

Fig. 5 is a sectional view on line 5-5 of Fig. .1;, illustrating the means for imparting rotation to a turntable;

Fig. 6 is a vertical sectional view through the support on line 6-6 of Fig.4, to illust'ate the mechanism for advancing the sup port towards the car or for withdrawing it from the same;

Fig. 7 is an enlarged detail View and partly section of the mechanism for operating the unloader proper; V

Fig. 8 is a side elevation and partly sec.- tion of some elements similar to those illustrated in Fig. 7, and serving to tilt the un loader; v

Fig. 9 is a sectional elevation through the mechanism assembled on the platform, taken on line 9-4) of Fig. 8, and showing the de vice on a slightly larger scale;

Fig. 10 is a sectional elevation and partly section of'the boom sections shown in extended position; I v

Fig. 11 is a similar view on a larger scale and showing the complete boom contracted; Fig. 12 is a sectional View on line 1212 'of'Fig. 11, through the front end of the boom;

Fig. 13 is a sectional view on a larger scale on line 13-13 of Fig-10'; Fig. 1 1 is a top plan view on a larger scale showing the attachment means for a chain;

Fig. 15 is a sectional view through a part ol a boom section to illustrate the attachment of an extending chain;

Fig. 16 is a horizontal section through this boom on line 16-16 of Fig. 15;

Fig. 17 is a transverse section on' line 17-17 of Fig.15 through the same beam section, and

Fig. 18 is a sectional detail view illustrating the attachment of a bracket to the main support of the unloader structure, the section being taken on line 1818 of Fig. 6.

The assembled device is mounted on a track-way which, as illustrated in Figs. 1, 2 and 4, comprises a pair of spaced channel irons 1 which are secured to their bed, preterably. at a slight elevation from the same, by means of a plurality of brackets 2. These brackets may rest on sleepers or ties 3 which extend'transversely of the traclo'way.

The substructure of the device includes a strong framework consisting of the transverse beams 4: and of longitudinal beams 5 which support a platform'o. The frame structure, composed of the beams 4 and '5, is provided with rollers 7 of sufficiently large diameter to engage the upper and lower flanges of the channel irons which form the track-way 1, these rollers being mounted on brackets 8 which are secured to the framework 4, 5.

The superstructure rises from the plat form 6 and includes primarily a large cast iron bracket 10 near the front end of the platform 6, having its foot portion fixed to a transverse beam 4 (Figs. 4 and 6), and having its upper end rigidly united with a vertical frame. This latter, as may be seen in Figs. 1, 2, 4, and 6, includes the uprights 14 and two transverse parallel beams 17, constructed at their upper ends as channel irons, with their open sides turned towards each other (Figs. 4, 18). This square frame which is secured to the substructure is braced against the same by slanting angle irons 11, which are fastened at their foot to the outer beams by plates 13 and at their upper ends to the uprights 14 by plates 12 above a transverse bar 15. The bracket is secured to the transverse channel irons 17 by means of boxes 16 riveted to these beams 17 (Figs. 18 and 5) between the same and having their backs united by bolts and screws to lateral extensions 19 of the bracket 10.

A vertical plate 29 (Fig. 6) secured to the uprights 14, serves in combination with brackets 34 for supporting the transverse shaft 20 on which a pinion 21 is rigidly secured. This shaft 20 projects beyond the brackets 34 and is provided at the project ing ends with hand wheels 22, whereby an operator standing on the platform 6 may manually rotate the shaft 20. The pinion 21 is in mesh with a large gear 23 on a shaft 24 also having its bearings in the brackets 34, and shaft 24 also supports a sprocket wheel 25 over which a drive chain 26 is trained. This chain 26 has its ends fastened to suitable anchoring devices 27 and 28 located between the track beams 1 and at the front and rear ends respectively of the track. A channel iron 30, also mounted on the sleepers 3 of the track. acts as guide for this chain, and maintains the same in proper position with respect to sprockets 31 and 32, which are rotatably mounted in bearings 33 projecting downward from the substructure. As the chain 26 is also trained over these sprockets 31 and 32, rotation of the sprocket 25 effected by the hand wheels 22 will. cause the entire structure to be propelled in one or the other direction upon the track, depending upon the rotation of the gear A pawl (not shown) and looking the gear 21 may serve for holding the substructure against movement on its tracks.

The operator standing on the platform 6, also may actuate manually a turntable which is rotatably mounted in the head at the free end of the hear y bracket 10.

The head 35 (Fig. 9) is provided with inwardly directed. flanges 36 and 37 as supports of ball bearings 38 and 39, which are interposed between these flanges and corresponding flanges of a rotary drum or cylinder 40 extending axially through the head. To facilitate the assembly of this turntable structure within the head 35, a plate 41 is secured to the lower surface of the cylinder 40 and cooperates with the ball caring 39 and flange 36 to absorb the upward thrusts. The turntable cylinder 40 is fixedly connected with a pair of laterally and upwardly projecting parallel arms 42 (F igs. 7 and 8), between which the boom structure of the unloader is pivotally secured at 43.

The means for imparting rotation to the turntable and boom structure are illustrated in Figs. 4 and 5 and comprise a tension member, as for instance a cable 45 which is looped about the drum 40 and, at a point intermediate the ends of the cable is fastened at 46 to the surface of the same, thereby preventing the rope 45 from slipping on the circumference of the drum. The ends of the rope are secured to a chain 47, and this chain is trained about a sprocket 48 which is fixedly united with a gear 49 loosely rotating about a spindle 50 which has a foot bearing at 51 on one of the transverse beams 17. The gear 49 is rotated by means of a pinion 52 on a shaft 53 carrying a hand wheel 54 at its top end and within reach of an operator who stands on the platform 6. The shaft 53 is carried in a. bracket 55 fastened in front of a beam 17 and another bearing bracket 56 for the shaft 53 is disposed between the plates 12.

From this mechanism it is apparent that upon rotation of the hand wheel 54 in one or the other direction a similar rotation is transmitted to the sprocket 48, tension is exterted on the cable 45 at one or the other of its strands, and a rotary movement is imparted to the drum 40. The strands of the cable 45 may be guided over suitable sheaves or rollers 58 which are loosely mounted on a shaft 59 (Fig. 5) extending transversely of the bracket 10 near the head portion 35 of the same.

The boom structure, which, as stated above, is pivotally mounted at 43 on the turntable arms 42, includes several boom sections A, B, C, D which may be telescoped into each other, or which may be extended so as to elongate the entire structure to reach the end of the car. The outermost boom section or housing A. as shown in Figs. 9, 10, 11, and 12, comprises two parallel vertical side plates 60 and 61., which are connected near the top and bottom by relatively heavy transverse channel irons 62 and 63, both shown in Fig. 9 to face downward.

At one side of this casing a large bracket 64 is secured and serves for receiving a mobe desired.

tor 65 through which the tilting of the boom structure about the pivots 43 may be offected. Figs. 8 and 9 show that the shaft of the motor 65 is extended beyond the casing of the same and carries a worm 66 in mesh with a worm gear 67 on a transverse shaft 68. To support the shaft 68, the gear casing 69 (Fig. 9) is provided with bearing extensions 70 and 71; this'casing is rigidly supported at 72 on a bearing bracket 7 3 in which the worm shaft of the motor is rotatably mounted, andwhich -in its turn is fastened to an extension 74 bolted to a side wall of the bracket 64 for the motor. The shaft68 carries atthe projecting end (Fi 9) a pinion 75 to drive a gear 76 whici is mounted ona shaft 77 supported above the housing A of the boom in the bearing lugs 78. In rigid connection with the shaft 77 rollers 80 are mounted at the sides of the housing A and to the circumference of these rollers the chains 81 are fixedly secured at one end. The other ends of these chains are attached at 82, (Fig. 8) to the free ends of the arms 42 of the turntable and it is obvious, therefore, that upon rotation of the rollers 80 the chain will either be wound up on, or unwound from the same, and the free length of the chains will therefore be decreased or increased. This willproduce a tilting movementof the rear end of the housing A and thereby of the entire'boom structure, when'the motor 65 is operated.

Figs. 7 and 8 also show that the tilting chains 81 are guided over rollers 84 which are fastened to the sides of the housing A by means of brackets 85. i

Another similar bracket but larger than the bracket 64 is secured to the opposite side of the boom housing A, as may be seen from Figs. 7 and 9. This bracket .90 supports a platform 91 on" which a motor 92 is located. This motor serves for extending and contracting the boom structure as may The shaft of the motor 92 carries at the end projecting from the motor casing, a gear 93in mesh with a larger gear 94 which is mounted on a shaft 95-carrying the worm 96. This worm reacts against ball bearings (Fig. 7 and the shaft rests in a bracket 97 which also carries portions of a'housing 98 for the gears 93, 94 which maybe rotated in a lubricant. The worm 96 outhe shaft 95 is in driving engagement with a worm gear 99 in a casing 100 braced against the boom struc ture. by the bar 101 (Fig. 9). At the end of the worm gear shaft 102 which projects from the housing 100, a relatively heavy sprocket wheel 103 is fixedly mounted. This sprocket wheel turns in a casing 104 (Fig. 9) a heavy chain 105 is trained over it and over a sprocket wheel 106 (Fig. 12), which is rigidly secured to a shaft 107, supported in bearings 109 and extending transversely through the plates 60, 61. Spacing sleeves 108 are mounted between the plates and engage a pinion 110 integral with the shaft 107.

Fig. 7 shows that the chain 105 is protected by a casing 111, which is'mo-unted on the side plate 61, and by a bracket 112, which may also serve as a support for the bearing lugs 109 of the shaft 107.

A second boom section B is constructed of lateral plates 113 and 114 which are connected on the top and on the bottom by channel irons 115 and 116, and is slidably disposed within the boom housing section A. This sec ond boom section is guided in a rectilinear path in the interior of the housing A by rollers 117 which, as shown in Figs. 7, 10, 11 and 12, are mounted at the front and top of the plates 60', 61, and are connected by a sleeve 118. The section B has a roller 119'at the rear end, riding on the lower channel iron 63 of the boom housing A, and a similar roller 120 at a point remote from the rear end. This roller 120 is mounted in front of the channel iron 116 and that part of the second boom section B which extends beyond. the roller 120 forwardly carries in place of the transverse channel iron 116, a bar 121, the lower face of which is equipped with a rack 122 adapted for engagement with the pinion 110. 5 Y r 7 It is obvious, therefore, that upon rotation of the pinion 110 as a result of driving the motor 92, the section Bmay be displaced longitudinally andis guided in this displacement in a rectilinear path through the rollers 117 on the top surface of the second structure, and through the rollers 119 and. 120 traveling on the bottom surface of the outer housing. Other guiding means for the inner section will be referred to below. I

A third boom structure C, which, as shown in Figs. 10 and 12, is composed of the side plates 123 and 124 and which also has transverse members 125 and 126, respectively, is slidable within the second boom structure B. This third section C is guided for rectilinear movement principally by a roller rotatably mounted near the front end between the plates 114 of the second structure, and by rollers 131 which are also loosely rotatable below the third boom structure, engaging the outer surface of the transverse member 126 of the third section.

In order to effect a displacement of the third boom section. relatively of the second and simultaneously with the same a plural ity of connecting chains is associated with the three boom sections, A, B, C the ends of the chains being connected to the outer boom housingA and the third section C,

while intermediate parts are guided over sprockets or rollers of the second boom section B.

bracket is adjustably limited. The plates 141 may be adjusted longitudinally owing to the provision of slots 144 (Fig. 14),

w through which the holding bolts 145 extend, these bolts being held against longitudinal displacement in the channel iron. The plates 141 are projected downwardly through the web of the beam 62, by a lug 146 passing through a slot 147 in the beam, and chains 148, 148 are connected with the lower end of each lug 146. The other ends of these chains are attached to fixed points on the top plate 125 of the third boom section. These attachments are indicated in Fig. 10 at 150 and 151 respectively, and are in the form of bolts which are firmly connected with the element 125. The chains 148 and 148 are trained over sprockets 152 and 153 respec tively, which are secured rotatably on shafts 154 and 155 fixed in the plates 114 of the second boom section.

If, therefore, a longitudinal movement to the right (Fig. 10) is imparted to the rack bar 122 and thereby to the boom section B, the roller 153 also will move to the right and will thereby act on the loop of the chain 148 to extend said chain towards the right. The other chain 148 being fixedly attached to the plate 125 will follow this movement, and the entire inner boom section C will simultaneously be moved to the right.

lVhen through a suitable rotation of the pinion 110. the boom section B is moved to the left (Fig. 10), then the sprocket 152 will exert that pull on the chain 148 which will also lead to a movement of the inner boom section C to the left, so that upon operation of the pinion 110 both of the boom sections B, C in the interior of the housing A are displaced. The displacement of the inner boom section C, however, is here twice as much as the displacement of the second boom section B.

The sprocket 152 is mounted midway between the lateral plates 114. At both sides of the same, friction rollers are mounted (Fig. 9) which are in engagement with bars 161, secured to the lower face of the channel iron 62. These rollers in coaction with the bars 161 therefore act as additional guiding means to maintain the inner boom section within a rectilinear path.

Similar to the way in which the third section C is moved upon actuation of thesec- 0nd ssection B through the rack bar 122, a fourth boom section, indicatated at D, can be displaced within the third section G. This innermost section D also is composed of lateral plates 163 and connecting channel irons 164; The two lateral plates 163 are extended beyond the transverse members 164 at the rear end of the boom section and are enlarged to receive bearings for a guiding roller 165 which is in contact with the two transverse plates 125 and 126 of the third boom section '0 at their inner faces. Owing to the provision of this roller 165, the fourth section D therefore is guided at its rear end, and other guiding means are provided in the form of additional rollers 166 and 167, respectively, which are loosely mounted at the forward end of the third boom section C and which enter into frictional engagement with the two outer surfaces of the transverse plates 164 of the boom section D.

Thedisplacement of this fourth section D of the boom is effected by means of chains 168, 175 which are secured at one of their ends through the bolts 169, 174 respectively fixed points on the boom section D, while their other ends are secured at 170, 176 respectively to lugs projecting from the rack bar 122 of the section B.

Figs. 15, 16 and 17 illustrate the details of this attachment to boom section B as comprising a bolt 171 which extends through the lug and is adjustably secured in place by suitable nuts. The lug 170, as will be seen, bridges the interspace between raised portions 172 held on both! lateral plat-es 114 of this boom section B. These bars 172 serve for supporting rollers 173 (Fig. 11) at the rear end of the boom sec tion C, whereby these sections C and B are guided on each other. The longitudinal channel formed between the bars 172 roceives the chains 168. 175. Both of the chains 175 and 168 are trained about sprock ets 177 and 178 respectively, which are secured to the shafts in section C, on which the rollers 17 3 travel.

If, therefore, a longitudinal displacement of the rack bar 122 occurs, it will be trans mitted through these chains to the fourth boom section D. The speed at which the section D is moved must be higher than that of section C, and the latter again travels faster than section B.

If, for instance, in Fig. 10 the rack bar 122 is displaced to the right, the sprocket 153 traveling to the right will through the chain 148 also cause the displacement of the section C attached to the chain. Owing to this displacement of the section C towards the right, the sprocket 178 will be carried towards the right, and as the chain 168 on the sprocket is fastened to the section D, the latter will be displaced. Upon reversion of the movement of the boom section B with re spect to the housing A, the sections C and D will be moved also towards the left (Fig. 10). j The boom section D carries in its forward end a scraper or hoe 180, consisting, as indicated, of the bottom plate 181 and lateral lit) fianges 182 which are secured to the boom selction D at the head 183 by rivets or the li (e.

From the above the operation of the device will be fully understood. After acar has been placed with its door in opposition to the track of rails 1, the bracket 10 is advanced towards the door while the entire boom is contracted. In this contracted condition the boom sections may be turned through actuation of the hand wheel 54 so as to point towards one end of the car, and by means of the motor65 which is then started, the boom section in contracted condition may be tilted so as to point at its forward end towards the upper portion of the car. In this tilting movement the arms 143 of the turntable remain in a horizontal plane, the smaller motor 64 merely having the purpose of shortening the free length of the chains 81 which are wound about the drum 80 near the rear end of the boom section A. While the boom sections are being tilted or subsequent thereto, the motor 92 is started in a predetermined direction so as to extend the sections. The motor 92 is then intermittently reversed, whereby the boom sections are expanded and contracted, and in this expanding and contracting movement, the scraper 180 will push the material from the remote end of the car in direction towards the opening or door of, the same, where it may drop out, the bracket 10 being sufliciently far away from the door of the box car to permit the bulk material to be discharged through this opening. After the heap of material in the interior of the car at one end of the same has been removed, the boom sections in contracted condition may be swung towards the other end of the car, if necessary, after they have been partly withdrawn or entirely withdrawn from the interior of the car. The same operation is then repeated on the other side until the'entire material or the larger part of the same has been completely thrown out. The chains 81 which effect the tilting of the boom sections u wardly towards the end Wall and roof ofthe car, also permit these sections to be tilted downwardly, the more so as the weights of the motors and the gearingare arranged opv posite that point of the boom sections about which the same may be tilted; namely, the pins 43. p

The two motors and 92 are electrically connected with controllers on plate 29 of the supporting structure, so as to be regulated by the operator on platform 6.

I claim: .1. In an, unloader, a supporting structure, including an angular bracket projecting laterally and upwardly from the structure, a

boom structure carried by said bracket, and

means carried by the boom structure for. ex-

tending and contracting. the same.

2. In an unloader, asupporting structure, a boom structure carried thereby and above the same, and power operated means mounted on the boom structure for tilting the same in a vertical plane about an axis passing through the top of the supporting structure.

3. In an unloader, a. supportingstructure, a boom structure carried thereby and above the same, means for turning the boom structure in a horizontal plane relatively to the supporting structure, power operatedmeans mounted upon the boom for tilting the same in a vertical plane about an axis passing through the top of the supporting structure, and means for expanding and contracting the boom structure without disturbing said power operated means or the angle which the boom may assume.

4. In an unloader, a supporting structure, a boom structure carried thereby, means for turning the boom structure relatively to the supporting structure in'a horizontal plane,- means on the boom structure for tilting the same in a vertical plane, and means mounted on the boom structure for expanding and contracting the same, all of said means be ing operable simultaneously.

5. In an unloader, a supporting structure, a boom structure carried thereby, means for turning the boom structure relatively to the supporting structure in a horizontal plane, means mounted on the boom structure for tilting the same in a vertical plane, and means mounted on the boom structure for expanding and contracting the same, said means being operable independently of each other.

6. In an unloader, a supporting structure, a boom structure carried thereby, means for turning the boom structure relatively to the supporting structu're in a horizontal plane, means mounted on the boom structure for tilting the same in a vertical plane, and means mounted on the boom'structure for ex panding and contracting the same, said means being controllable from the supporting structure. I

7. In an unloader, a supporting structure, a boom structure carried thereby, and

means mounted substantially in its entirety upon a vertical side of said boom for extendmg and contractlng the same;

8 In an unloader, a supporting structure,

an overhanging bracket secured to the supporting structure, a turntable movably mounted on the overhanging part of the bracket, a boom structure supported by the turntable above the same, and means for actuating the boom structure.

9. In anunloader, a supporting structure,

an overhanging bracket secured to the supporting structure, a turntable movably mounted on the overhanging part of the bracket, a boom structure supported by the turntable above the same, means on the supporting structure for actuating the turntable, and means on the boom structure for actuating the same.

10. In an unloader, a supporting structure, an overhanging bracket secured to the supporting structure, a turntable mounted thereon, a boom structure, carried above the turntable, the turntable being provided with trunnions about which the boom structure may swing, in a vertical plane, and means for swinging said boom structure.

11. In an unloader, a supporting structure, an overhanging bracket secured there to, a boom structure carried by the bracket. means on one side of the boom structure and secured thereto for expanding and contracting the same, and means secured to the other side of the boom structure for tilting the same.

12. In an unloader, a supporting structure, a boom structure carried thereby, a motor secured to one side of the boom struc ture for expanding and contracting the same, and a motor secured to the other side of the boom structure for tilting the same.

13. In an unloader, a supporting structure, a boom structure carried thereby, an angular bracket forming a part of the supporting structure, a turntable supported at the end of the angular bracket, and means for imparting rotation to the turntable in its support.

14. In an unloader, the combination o1 a supporting structure, having a platform and a turntable laterally disposed relatively to and above said platform, and means controllable by the operator on the platform for imparting rotation to the turntable.

15. In an unloader, the combination of a supporting structure, including an angular bracket, a turntable mounted on said angular bracket, a tension member secured intermediate its ends to said turntable and means connected with the ends of the tension memher, for imparting rotation to the turntable.

16. In an unloader, the combination of a supporting structure, including a turntable laterally disposed relatively to and above the supporting structure, means for imparting rotation to the turntable, the turntable being provided with a pair of parallel arms projecting from the turntable in the same direction, a boom structure pivotally mounted on said arms and means engaging said arms for tilting the boom structure.

17. In an unloader, a supporting structure, and a boom structure carried thereby, the boom structure comprising a housing, a plurality of sections telescopingly arranged with respect to said housing and With respect to each other, flexible elements interconnecting the housing with one of said sections, and the other sections with each other respectively, and means for extending and contracting the boom structure.

18. In an unloader, a supporting structure, a boom structure comprising a plurality of sections, interconnecting means for said sections located within the boom structure and means acting on the interconnecting means for simultaneously moving all of said sections with respect to each other.

19. In an unloader, a supporting structure, a boom structure having a plurality of sections, interconnecting means for said sections located within the boom structure and means acting on the interconnecting means for moving said several sections at ditlerent speeds.

20. In an unloader, a supporting structure, a boom structure havin several sections, means for simultaneously moving the sections of the boom structure, each at a rate of speed different from that of the other sections and connecting elements between said means and sections, all located within the boom structure.

21. In an unloader, a supporting structure, a boom structure having a plurality of telescoping sections, one of said sections comprising a rack bar, means engaging said rack bar for moving said section, and flexible elements interconnecting the other sections with the moved section and adapted to move said other sections when said rack bar section is moved.

22 In an unloader, a supporting structure, a boom structure having a plurality of sections, power actuated means for advancing or Withdrawing one of said sections, a chain connected atone end to a fixed point of the boom structure, and at another point fixedly connected to another section, the first named section having a sprocket over which said chain is trained, whereby upon movement of said first named section in a predetermined direction, the second section is moved.

23. In an unloader, a supporting structure, a boom structure having a housing and a plurality of sections, one of said sections including a rack bar, power means acting on said rack bar to move the rack bar section relatively to the housing, a chain fixedly connected at one end to the housing, and at the other end to a second section, the rack bar section being provided With a sprocket over which said chain is trained, whereby upon movement transmitted to the rack bar section in a predetermined direction, the sprocket is moved in the same direction and thereby moves the chain and the third section.

24. In an unloader, a supporting structure, a boom structure having a housing and sections telescopingly arranged with respect to said housing, means for actuating one of said sections, and flexible elements interconnecting said sections and adjustably secured to the same, whereby upon movementof one of said sections, all of said sections are moved.

25. In an unloader, a supporting structure, and a boom structure, the boom structure comprising a housing and a plurality of telescopingly arranged sections, a motor on the housing, a rack bar on one of said sections, transmission gearing between said motor and said rack bar, and flexible elements interconnecting the other telescoping sections, whereby upon movement being imparted to the rack bar section, all of the sections are moved.

26. In an unloader, a supporting structure, a boom structure comprising a housing and a plurality of telescoping sections, sprockets on said sections, each of said sections being connected with another section by a pair of chains, and each of said chains being trained over a sprocket on a section intermediate said chain connected sections.

27. In an unloader, a supporting structure, a boom structure, and power actuated means for tilting the boom structure in a vertical plane, a transmission driven by said power actuated means and driving a gear, a drum coaxial with said gear and to which a chain is fastened at one of its ends, the other end of the chain being fastened to a fixed point of the supporting structure.

28. In an unloader, the combination of a supporting structure, a boom structure comprising a plurality of telescopingly arranged sections, a motor mounted on one side of the outermost section, a pinion on .said section and driven by said motor, a rack on the next adjacent inner section in engagement with said pinion, a chain secured to said rack at one end and having its other end connected .with the third inner section and another supporting structure, a boom structure, a 1

turntable, arms projecting from the turntable and on which the boom structure is pivotally mounted, a motor connected with the boom structure, a flexible element secured at one'end to an arm of the turntable and secured at the other end to a rotatable element on the boom structure, and means for imparting rotation to said rotatable element to wind or unwind said flexible element thereon.

30. I11 an unloader, the combination of a supporting structure, including a platform, an overhanging bracket secured thereto, a turntable on the overhanging part of the bracket, a boom structure tiltably connected with the turntable, motors on the boom structure for effecting tilting of the same and expansion and contraction respectively, thereof, and means on the supporting structure for controlling said motors.

In testimony whereof I affix my signature at 85 Oneida St, Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

GEORGE MANIERRE.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2613003 *Jan 21, 1946Oct 7, 1952Walter A KostickGrain unloading machine
US2655275 *Jun 6, 1951Oct 13, 1953Caney A ThompsonPulpwood boxcar unloader
US3830438 *Jan 20, 1972Aug 20, 1974Hesston CorpMachine for feeding materials from a stack
US5009560 *Dec 6, 1988Apr 23, 1991Yellow Freight System, Inc.Mixed freight handling system
US5067867 *Jan 14, 1991Nov 26, 1991Yellow Freight System, Inc.Conveyor for mixed freight handling system
US5088873 *Jan 14, 1991Feb 18, 1992Yellow Freight System, Inc.Manipulator mixed freight handling system
US5174708 *Jul 24, 1991Dec 29, 1992Yellow Freight System, Inc.Boom mounted multiple stage freight lift apparatus
US5176485 *Jul 25, 1991Jan 5, 1993Yellow Freight System, Inc.Freight manipulator with articulated cantilever boom
Classifications
U.S. Classification414/572, 414/395
International ClassificationB65G65/00, B65G65/44
Cooperative ClassificationB65G65/44
European ClassificationB65G65/44