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Publication numberUS1627459 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 3, 1927
Filing dateFeb 15, 1926
Priority dateFeb 15, 1926
Publication numberUS 1627459 A, US 1627459A, US-A-1627459, US1627459 A, US1627459A
InventorsRanney William C
Original AssigneeRanney William C
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Holder and carrier for golf clubs
US 1627459 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

1,627,459 May 1927' w. c. RANNEY HOLDER AND CARRIER FOR GOLF CLUBS Filed Feb. 1 1926 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 May 3, 1927. 1,627,459

w. c. RANNEY I HOLDER AND CARRIER FOR cow owns Filed Feb. 1 1926 2 Sheets-Shee t 2 Patented May 3, 1927.

UNITED STATES WILLIAM G. RANNEY, 0F ELBRIDGE, NEW YORK.

HOLDER AND CARRIER FOR GOLF CLUBS.

Application filed February 15, 1926. Serial No. 88,479.

My invention relatesto a holder and support for golf clubs and, if desired, also a supply of balls, it being particularly devised for the use of pla ers who cannot have the services of cad ies. The holder which I have devised enables a player to dispense with the usual golf bag of leather or canvas, although the latter may be used in conjunction with my holder and support if desired. While being carried by the player the holder confines the golf clubs, but when he desires to play it is set upon the ground, and supporting legs are moved outward to sustain the holder in an upright position, itbeing at the same time opened so as to permit free selection and removal of the club or clubs desired for use. When the holder is raised by the handle from the upright standing position to be carried, the legs close inwardly, and encircling arms close about the shafts of the clubs, thus securely retaining them within the holder as it is being carried.

In the drawings- Figure 1 is a perspective view of a holder and carrier for golf clubs embodying my invention, theparts being illustrated in the positions they occupy when the holder is resting upon the ground and is supported in an upright position by the. legs.

Fig. 2 is a side view of the holder with the parts in the positions they occupy while the holder is being carried.

Fig. 3 is a top plan view showing the su porting frame, the arms for confining t e clubs. and the connection of the movable handle with the arms, through which the latter are operated. a

Fig. 4 is a horizontal sectional view looking downward, taken on the line IVIV of Fig. 1.

In the accompanying drawings, 2 indicates a base plate which is preferably circular in shape and may be made of wood or other suitable material. Upon this plate rest the ends of the shafts of the golf clubs when placed within the holder. Rods 3, preferably two of them. extend upwardly from the eripheral edge of the base plate, to whlch they are secured by having their ends bent, as at 3, and laid in grooves in the peripheral edge of the plate, where they are secured. The rods are of a length suited to ive support to the upper ends of the clu shafts when placed within the holder. They are preferably united by an integral semi-circular portion 5 located in a plane parallel with the plane of the base 2, and extending to the rear of the rods 3. One or more rings 4, preferably formed of wire, are supported on the upright rods 3, but a single ring, arranged a llttle above the base plate, being shown.

6 designates the handle of the carrier. It is located to that side of the holder which I herein term the rear side, and is preferabl formed by twisting together the intermediate portions of two wires or small metal rods, the upperportions 7 of which diverge and are coiled about the rods 3 near their upper ends to form eyes 8, or are otherwise secured to such rods so as to be free to move longitudinally upon them. The lower ends of the wires forming the harfdle 6 extend toward the rods 3 in side-by-si-de relation to each other, as indicated at 16, and then diverge, as at 16, their ends being coiled about the rods secured to the rods so as to be free to move longitudinally upon them. When the carrier is lifted, by one grasping the handle, the latter moves u wardly, sliding upon the rods 3, and when 1t is set down and the handle released the latter is moved downwardly upon the rods. The purpose of these movements will be explained.

13, 13 are a pair of forwardly extending curved arms at the upper ends of the rods 3, upon which they are free to swing, being preferably connected with the rods by eyes 12. When the arms 13 are swung inwardly or toward each other they form, with the curved piece 5 of the upright supporting frame, a closure of ring shape adapted to encircle and confine the shafts of the clubs near their ends. When the curved arms are moved outwardly or away from each other the encircling ring is opened, giving access to the clubs, which may then be easily removed from the holder. 1

, I make provision for automatically opening and closing the arms 13 by the sliding movement of the handle upon the rods 3 which 'has been referred to. The arms 13 are preferably formed of pieces of stiif'wire, coiled at intermediate portions to form the eyes 12 surrounding the rods, and thence continuing to form the parts 10 which lie alongside the upper portions of the upright frame rods 3. The lower ends of the parts 10 are coiled to form loops or rounding. the rods 3. Stops 14 are arranged 3 to form eyes 17, or are otherwise v eyes sur- I below the eyes or coils 10 and hold the curvedarms 13 in, place upon the rods 3. The upper ends of the wires or rods constituting the handle 6 are bent to form eyes 9 which surround the rods 10 of the encircling arms 13, the eyes 9 being just beyond the loops 8 that embrace the rods 3.

The rods 10 each have a slight spiral bend, relative to the rods 3, so that as the upper looped ends of the handle are moved lengthwise of the rods 3 and 10, the latter are rotated somewhat about the rods 3, cansing the arms 13 to be opened and closed, as has been described. Thus when the handle is moved downwardly, as when the holder is setdown upon the ground, the encircling arms 13 are opened; and when the handle is moved upwardly, as when the holder is lifted, the encircling arms are closed.

18 indicates a-pair of legs, pivotally supported at their upper ends, at 19.- The legs are connected by links 20 with the movable handle frame. As shown, the upper ends of the'links 20 are united to clips 21 secured to the wires constituting the handle frame adjacent to where the parts 15 thereof join with the diverging parts 16, which location is inside of the pivotal supports 19 of thelegs, that is, between such supports and the rods 3. 22 are clips on the legs to which the lower ends of the links 20 are united. IVhen the support rests upon the ground and the handle has been moved downwardly, the legs 18 will be swung outwardly or away from the rods 3, as indicated in Fig. 1, by reason ofthe connection of the legs with the movable handle frame; but when the handle is moved upwardly, as when the support is being carried, as indicated in Fig. 2, then the legs will be swung inwardly or toward the base and supporting rods 3. Thus it will be seen that the movements of the handle upon the rods 3 are utilized to effect the opening and closing of the encircling arms 13, and also the outward movements of the legs to supporting positions when the support is set down, and the inward movements, to inactive positions, while the support is being carried.

The frame on which the legs 18 are hinged or ivoted is preferably formed of wire and rigidly secured to the rods 3. It is shown as being of two parts, the upper of which consists of a piece of wire bent to have two arms 23, 23, secured at their upper ends to the rods 3 and curved downwardly and rearwardly to form the supports for the pivoted ends 19 of the legs. Thence the arms 23 extend downwardly, in the form of an intermediate, loop that is united by intertwining coils 27 with the lower part of the leg support, 25. This part consists of a wire connected at its ends to the rods 3 and extending thence downwardly and rearwardly to form a pair of guides 26 for the legs 18, in which they lie when moved outwardly to supporting position, as indicated in Figs. 1 and 4. The intermediate portion of the lower section or part of the leg support, between the guides 26, is united with the intermediate portion of the upper part or section by the coils 27.

28 indicates a golf ball holder. It consists of a pair of approximately V-shaped wire end brackets 29, 30, supported upon the frame rods 3, and located preferably to the rear of the latter, so as not to interfere. with the removal of the clubs from the holder. The lower bracket 30 is preferably located just above the ring 4, although its location is a matter of convenience rather than one of necessity. A series of upright rods 31 extend between the brackets 29 and 30, being preferably supported in intermediate eyes 32 formed in the brackets. The upright rods 31- are preferably located at the angles of an equilateral triangle, and thus are adapted to serve as the side supports for a stack of balls which may be placed within the holder 28. The portions of the .lower bracket 30 lying between the eyes 31 thereof will serve as the base of the holder on which the lowermost ball rests. Toprevent the balls escaping from the holder the upper end of one of the rods 31, preferably the rearmost one, is bent to form an arm that overlies the enclosed space in which the balls are placed. This rod has sufficient freedom of rotative movement, in the supporting eyes 32, to permit the arm 31 to be swung to one side to allow balls to be inserted into and removed from the carrier 28.

I have described and illustrated in detail an embodiment of my invention in which most of the parts are formed of wire, but it is apparent that the invention is not limited to the particular material employed in forming the several parts of the holder.

What I claim is:

1. In a holder and carrier for golf.clubs, the combination of a frame in which the clubs may be set, movable rigid confining arms for holding the clubs in the frame,

, manually operated means by which the arms may be set to open or to closing position, as desired.

2. In a holder and carrier for golf clubs, the combination of a frame in which the clubs may be set, suitably supported movable confining arms for holding the clubs in the frame, a handle by which the holder may be carried movableupon the frame, and connec tions between the handle and the confining arms by which the latter are opened or close accordingly as the handle is moved relative to the frame.

3. In a holder and carrier. for golf clubs, the combination of a frame in which the clubs may be set, suitably supported movable confining arms for holding the clubs in the frame, a handle by which the holder ma be carried movable to an upper position when the holder is being carried and to a lower position when the holder is resting upon the ground, and connections between the handle the combination of an upright frame in be which the clubs may be set, confining arms pivotally supported upon the frame near'the upper end thereof and arranged to encircle the shafts of the clubs, a handle by which the frame may be carried supported on the frame so as to slide thereon, and connections between the handle and the confining arms arranged to move the arms on their pivots to closing position when the handle is moved into the position occupied while carrying the holder, and to move them to open position when the handle is moved to the position it occupies when the holder is at rest on the ground.

5. In a holder and carrier for golf clubs, tle combination of a frame in which the clubs may be set, having upright rods, a carrying handle supported on the rods and movable along the same, confining arms pivoted upon the upright rods of the frame arranged to be moved to a position to encircle the shafts of the clubs and confine them in the frame, bars connected with the confining arms and lying alongside the upright rods of the supporting frame, the bars having pivotal movement about the upright frame rods, they being spirally arranged relativethereto, and connections between the handle and the confining arms including loops that encircle the upright frame rods and also the bars of the confining arms which lie along 1 side the frame rods, whereb ment of thehandle the con ing arms are caused to turn on their pivotal, supports.

6. In a holder and carrier for golf clubs, the combination of a frame in which the clubs may be set, suitabl sup orted movable confiningarms for hol ing t e clubs in the frame, movable legs for sustaining the holder when resting upon the ground, and manually operated means by which the confining arms are alternately moved to open and to closing positions, and the legs are alternately moved by the movecOnfining arms for hol .clubs may y to supporting and to inactive or closed positions.

7. In a holder and carrier for golf clubs,

the combination of a frame in which the sup orted movable ng t e clubs in the frame, legs movable alternately to ositions for sustaining the holder upright w en resting upon the ground, and to inactive closed positions, a handle by clubs may be set, suitabliy 1 carried movably supported on the frame, and connections between the handle and the confining arms and the sustaining legs, respectively,by which said partsare simultaneously operated as the handle is moved on the frame.

8. In a holder and carrier for golf clubs, the combination of a frame in which the clubs may be set, a movable handle frame which the holder may located to one side of the supporting frame and having arms slidably uniting it with the supporting frame, legs for sustaining the holder in an upright position, ivotally supported to one side of the upriglit supporting frame, and connecting links between the legs and the movable handle frame, the connections with the latter being between the pivotal supports for the legs and the upright frame, whereby as the handle frame is moved in one direction the free ends of the legs are swung away from the supporting frame, and when moved in the other direction are moved toward the supporting frame.

9. In a holder and carrier for golf clubs, the combination of a frame in which the be set, a pair of pivoted legs adapted when moved outwardly to hold the supporting frame in an upright position, and a frame carried by the said supporting frame on which the legs are supported, such frame being formed with guides in which the legs ie when moved outwardly to positions to hold the su porting frame upright.

10. In a l the combination of an which the clubs ma be set, avingaa pair of upright rods, an a holder for golf balls formed of brackets secured to the said rods, and-rods supported in the said brackets and spaced apart to form a cage ada ted to retain a stack of balls, one of the rods being upri ht frame in folder and carrier for golf clubs, i

bent to overlie the stack of balls and confine them within the holder.

' WILLIAM C. RANNEY.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3954239 *Jan 7, 1974May 4, 1976Kerbs Jr Charles FCarrier for golf equipment or similar items
US5285990 *Mar 17, 1993Feb 15, 1994Engel Thomas HGolf club rest
US5810299 *Apr 14, 1997Sep 22, 1998Poulos; JonGolf bag support stand
Classifications
U.S. Classification248/96
International ClassificationA63B55/06, A63B55/00, A63B55/04
Cooperative ClassificationA63B55/04
European ClassificationA63B55/04