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Publication numberUS1627665 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 10, 1927
Filing dateNov 8, 1921
Priority dateNov 8, 1921
Publication numberUS 1627665 A, US 1627665A, US-A-1627665, US1627665 A, US1627665A
InventorsOverbury Frederick C
Original AssigneeFlintkote Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Roof
US 1627665 A
Images(1)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

May 1o, 1927.-

F. C. OVERBURY ROOF infini...

Patented May 10,1927.

- *UNITED STATES rminnnicx C.l ovERBU'nY, or HILLSDALE, Naw JERSEY, AssMIGNoa'To man F'LINT- Korn COMPANY, or'Bos'roN, MASSACHUSETTS, A CORPORATION or MASSACHU- SETTE.

noon. f

Application ined Npvember s, 1921. seal No. 513,664.

This invention relates to roofing of that type commonly constructed of felt impregnated with asphalt and coated with a heavy asphalt on which are spread and partially embedded particles or granules of/slate or other suitable surfacing material which gives color to the roofingand adds toits weather..

and iireproong qualities. This roofing is of comparatively thin `material and unless special coloring or methods of laying lare resorted to, presents al flat, uninterestingl ap'- pearance, giving an unsubstantial and cheap eifect. One method of relieving thisfwlat appearance to some extent is by laying the roof in a series of. overlapping courses or strips, these strips being cut if desired at their lower edges to simulate the butts of shingles.

Another method which has been paroposed is to produce shadow effects by variously coloring the'material.A This.' may be done by rolling the granular surface material into the asphalt coating. while plastic to a greater extent-'where shadow effects are desired than at other places so that the asphalt flows between the surfacing particles, filling the inf terstices and becoming more or lessvisible n vilnpresslon rolls,form1ng'1n lowrelief a series of. tabs 4 separated by narrow depresthe surface depending 'on the ressure used.

Y As the asphalt is black this actlon causes the According to the present invention the sure in the manner above described.

' pear darker being somew roof toappeardarker at vthe portions sub-v jected to greater pressures, giving the effect of showing the same color as the rest of the material under less favorable light 4conditions. This rolling also produces a surface Aeffect in` low-relief, the ortions which'aplIiat depressed below the level of the 1lighter colored portions.

roofing is composed of overlying courses, the

- ,4 5 surface? level of the exposed portions being 'depressedsharply about the entire exposed margin ofthe overlying course and tapering l therefrom to its normal level. .This insures the raising of the exposed margins above the level of the adjacent underlying material and greatly enhances. the apparent thickness of,

the edge. This a pearance is further heightened. by the 'sha' ow eifect produced by the darker coloring effected by t e localized pres- I This construction makesv possible a much more marked appearance of substantialiconsible with this type of rooting.,

struction than has hitherto vbeen found' pos- Fora more complete understanding o futhiswthe adjacent course as 'shown in Fi ""invention, together with further and 3- and the depressions 5 underlie t e slots `advantageous details and combinations of.

parts, reference may be had to the accompanying drawings in which- Figure. 1 is a plan of a portion of .a roof constructed (according to this invention.

Figures 2 and 3 are sections on lines 2 2 is a section on line 5-5 of 'inwardly from the lower edge of the strip.

vSomewhat above the upper end of theslolts .3 the lower edge of a .succeeding overlying course is to .be positioned with its slots @staggering the rslots 3.. Definingv the position of* the edge of this overlying strip the surface of the strip v1 is impressed sharply asat a as by passing the strip under suitably. formed sions 5 corresponding in shape and size to the slots 3, assuming thatthe overlying strip is of the :same contour as strip l. This im# particles of coating material to show on the pear darker at the depressed portions and giving a desired shadow effect.

The depressed portion r1ses vgradually from ,1 5

ao surface thereof, this causing, the strip to appressed,the surface thereof being level with that of the tabs 2. '1A are superp d-iii over in Figure 3 2, and 3, the tabs 2 lof each overlyingcourse mating the relief portions 4 of theugderlying course so that the sharply s portions a offeach course are po-v ioned directly nextto the lower edge of res 2 plurality of such 'strips ying courses as shown 3. This causes the tabs 2 at their margins to be spaced above-the adjacent surface of the underlying course the amount to which this surface is depressed below the general' level of the strip. Each course also is thus clearly marked to show the position of a succeeding course which adds to the facility with which the roof may be laid.

Due to the fact that thenpper surface of the material is rough, the courses do not l lie closely superposed so that by this construction an apparent thickness of the shingle butts, caused 'by the thickness of -the tabs 2 added'to the relief of the portions 4, may be substaitally twice the thickness of the strip material without dangerously thinning the material at the depressed portions. While as herein shown the roofing is composed of strips, either extending continuously across the roof or in the form of shorter sections, it being common in the art to employ sections having four tab portions, the same idea might also be` exemplified with individual shingles, it being only necessary for the purpose of vthis invention vto depress the surface of the underlying course sharply about the margin of the overlying course and tapering gradually upward away from this margin, this depressed portion being shaded as above described to give an added shadow effect. It is also evident that the lower edge of material might be cut in any shape desired and that the edges of overlying courses might be of different shape or pattern if` desired.

Having thus described an embodiment of this invention it should be evident that many changes and modifications might be made4 therein without departing from its spirit or scope as defined by the appended claims.

l. A roof composed of overlapping courses of material, the exposed surface portions of each course'lying adjacent the edges of the overlying courses being depressed below the normal level of the remaining surface portions, and the portions beneath vsaid overlying course being at the normal level.

2. roof composed of overlapping courses of strip material, the exposed surface por-- tions of each course lying adjacent the edges of the loverlying course being depressed '.11.A stri ofA strip material, the lexposed surface portions of each course lying adjacent the edges of the overlying course being. depressed be# low 'the normal level of and of a darker shade than the remaining surface portions and the portions lying beneath the overlying course being at the normal level.

5. yA roof composed of overlapping courses of material, the exposed surface portions of the courses being sharply depressed below the remaining surface around the exposed margin of the overlying course and gradually rising and merging with the remaining surface away from said margin.

6. A roof composed of overlapping courses of material, the exposed Surface portions thereof being sharply depressed'below the remaining surface around the exposed margin of the overlying course and gradually rising and merging with the remaining surface away from said margin, the depressed portions being of darker shade than the remainder of said surface.

7. A strip shinglecomp'rising a strip cut on its lower edge in `a repeated pattern, and having above said edge the same pattern in staggered relation to said edge impressed in the surface thereof tosharply mark the o location of the lower edge of a superposed strip, said impression merging gradually to the normal level `of the surface toward the lower edge of said strip.

8. A strip shingle comprisingl a strip cut on its lower edgein a lrepeated pattern, and' having above said edge the same pattern in staggeredv relation to said edge impressed in the surface thereof to sharply mark the location of the lower edge of a superposed strip, Y' said impression merging gradually to the normal level of the surface `toward the lower edge of said strip, said impressed portion being of darker shade than the remainder of said strip surface.

9. A strip shingle comprising a strip cut on its -..lower edge ina pattern and having abovel said edge a pattern of the lower edge of a second strip to be superposed on said strip impressed in the outersurface thereof, said impressed pattern being sharply defined at its upper edge and at its lower edge merging into the remaining surface of said strip. l

10. A strip shingle comprising a strip cut on its lower edge in apattern and havingabove said edge a pattern of the lower edge of a second stripl to be superposed on sald strip impressed in the outer surface thereof, sald impressed pattern being sharply defined at its upper edge and at its lower edge .merging into the remaining .surface of said strip, said impressed portion being of darker color than the'remainder of said strip.

p shingle comprising a strip notched at lts lower edge to define shingle-f lll y an abrupt forwardly simulating tabs,

- its said the flat. upper lsurface of gered With respect to the notches of said` strip, the upper edge of said depression being sharply define and the lower edgel merging into the undepressed surface, said' depressed surface being of darker color than that of the remainder of the surface.

13. A prepared roofing shingle element comprising a fibrous foundation layer, an asphaltcoating and a grit surface having grit surface depressed vand the underlying asphalt coating facing transverse shoulder extending throughout the width of the shingle element at the inner margin of its weather end.

14. A prepared roofing shingle element comprising a brous foundation layer, an

asphalt coating and al grit surfacet having its said grit surface depressed and' the underlyingA asphalt coating molded to provide. i ,an abrupt forwardl facing transverse t roughout the width shoulder extending of the shin le element at the inner mar n of its weat er end, and a sloping surflce portion extending forwardly infront of the said shoulder and merging adually with shingle element in its said weather end.

15. A shingleelement having the surface of said-stripmolded to provide -course having a forwardly a 4its upperY Y"surface at the inner end of its weather porfacing transverse shoulder excomprising a fibrous foundation layer and A an asphalt coating of uniform thickness throughout the exposed and covered portions of the 'shingle element except at. the inner end of the exposed portion of the shingle where its said asphalt coating is of reduced thickness to providev an abrupt forwardfacing transverse shoulder extending' l throughout the width of the shingle element.'

17. A roof covering com rising, in combination, a plurality of partially overlapping courses of shingles and spacing means integial with the covered ortion of each course and supporting the ree edges of the shingles of each course above the level of the immediately adjacent exposed surface of the shingles ofthe next lower course.

18. A roof covering comprising, in com` bination, a plurality of partially overlapping courses of shingles, the shingles of each facing transverse shoulder aligned with the free edges of the `shingles of the next higher course.

19. A roof covering comprising, in combination, a plurality of partially overlapping courses of shingles, the shingles of each course having a forwardly facing transverse shoulder aligned with the free edges of the shingles of the next higher course and a sloping surface portion extending forwardly in front of the said shoulder and merging adually with the flat exposed upper suraces of the shingles.

In testimony whereof I have aixed my signature. l

'FREDERICK c. ovERBURY.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5369929 *Feb 1, 1994Dec 6, 1994Elk Corporation Of DallasLaminated roofing shingle
US5375387 *Jan 7, 1992Dec 27, 1994Davenport; Ralph G.Roofing shingle providing simulated slate roof covering
US5611186 *Nov 30, 1994Mar 18, 1997Elk Corporation Of DallasLaminated roofing shingle
US5666776 *Aug 30, 1995Sep 16, 1997Elk Corporation Of DallasFor enhancing the appearance of depth of the shingle
Classifications
U.S. Classification52/559
International ClassificationE04D1/26, E04D1/00
Cooperative ClassificationE04D1/26
European ClassificationE04D1/26