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Publication numberUS1628628 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 10, 1927
Filing dateDec 13, 1922
Priority dateDec 13, 1922
Publication numberUS 1628628 A, US 1628628A, US-A-1628628, US1628628 A, US1628628A
InventorsHunt Clarence T
Original AssigneeWilliam C Beers
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Mechanical miniature theatrical
US 1628628 A
Abstract  available in
Images(8)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

May 10, 1927. 1,628,628

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c. T. HUNT MECHANICAL MINIATURE THEATRICAL Filed Dec. 15, 1922 8 Sheets-Sheet 8 Patented May 10, 1927.

1 azasza UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE.

CLARENCE "1. HUNT, OF NEW HAVEN, CONNECTICUT, ASSIGNOR T0 WILLIAM C. BEERS,

OF DANBURY,

CONNECTICUT.

MECHANICAL MINIATURE THEATRICAL.

This invention relates to mechanical minieture theatricals.

The object of the invention is a combination of a miniature theatrical stage with figures disposed thereahout to represent ani mate beings, and mechanical devices cooperating with special constructions of the individual figures whereby the miniature figures are caused to perform ordinary actions of animate beings in lifelike manner, the whole being co-ordinated to cause a pre determined relation of the actions of one or more figures to thoseof other figures, with the result of causing the production on a small scale of a theatrical play or the like, involving actions by a number of individuals.

The invention consists of the arrangement and apparatus herein disclosed.

The several figures may be operated at coordinated times either by separate actuating means or by a common actuating means suitably controlled. The figures cooperate with one another to produce a unitary effect or illusion as of a continuous theatrical performance, holding the attention of a number of observers by virtue of the lifelike character of the performance.

The invention is adapted principally for show-window display to attract crowds to which demonstrations can be made, after the pert'orr-nancc, otthe wares to be sold. The device also is adapted for use as one of the more expensive types of toys. Experience with the invent-ion has demonstrated superior ability to draw crowds at a store window.

thuall figures or toys re resenting auin'late hcings and having movale members have been long known; but this invention difl'ers from those in various respects to be pointed out, all contributing to lifelike motions eltooled at co-ordinatcd times For the pur pose of sl-lsta-ining the interest and attention of observers; the figures being operated sue oessivcly or in co-ordinated time relation so that every movement in its relation to others can be seen without effort and will convey the impression of a logical sequence and a whole performance with related parts.

The mechanism for operating the several figures is so constructed as to properly time theactious of the figures to imitate, on a small scale. the production by living; per

sons, of a play or scene, the several figures seeming to be opcrativoly distinct from each other, and performing their distinctive movements in a lifelike manner without any visible operating mechanisms. An impression created on the mind of an observer of the operation of an embodiment of this invention is that the movements are so realistie and so apparently impossible by mechanical means directly operating the figures, that it seems as if some different force such as electromagnetism must be employed,

While the mechanism for actuating each figure involves individual novel arrangements and produces individual effects, yet the apparatus as a whole with its grouping or succession of individual effects produces a unitary total effect or illusion which would be lessened bv the elimination of one or more of the individual figures and effects (see Fig. l).

()l the drawings,

Figure 1 is a front elevation of the appa ratus showing a perspective interior view of a salesroom, store or old-fashioned cator saloon;

Fig. 2 is a rear elevation of the apparatus;

Fig. 3 is a bottom plan view of the apparatios;

F jg. 4 is a detail sectional view on the line ls-e of Fig. 2. looking in the direction of the arrows and showing the cams of an operating clockwork i Fig. 5 is a section on the line 5-5 of Fig. 4 looking in the direction of the arrows;

Fig. 6 is a detail sectional view looking from the rear of the aqiiparatus and showing the mechan sm for t -aerating lho figures of the salesman and customer;

Fig. 7 is :1 view of the l'iack of the customer, showing its controlling mechanism;

Fig. 8 is a vertical section on the line 8---8 oi. Fig. 7 looking in the direction of the arrows and. showing the mechanism for raising the left arm of the cl'lstonzier;

Fig. 9 is a detail view showing how the customer tilts the bottle;

Fig. 10 is a View looking from the rear of the bar and showing the lower portion of the body of the salesman or drink dispenser, the bottle on the r shelf, and the meclmntism controllifig the salesman and the hot-- i. o

the figure at the lunch counter and of the mechanism for controlling its arms;

Fig. 15 1s a detail sectional View on the line 15-15 of Fig. 14;, looking in the direction of the arrows, and showing the mechanism for raising the oyster and arm to the mouth of the figure;

Fig. 16 is a detail view of the left arm and operating mechanism for the figure at the lunch counter;

Fig. 17 is a vertical section on the line 17'1'7 of Fig. 1a, looking in the direction of the arrows'and showing the mechanism for raising the lunclicounteifigures right arm; I

Fig. 18 is a detail elevation looking at the back of the figure at the table and at the dog, showing the mechanism for operating them; I

Fig. 19 is a section on the line 1919 of Fig. 18, looking in the direction of the arrows; and

Fig. 20 is a section on the line 20-20 of Fig. 2, looking in the direction of the arrows and showing the details of the policemans right arm and connection to the drinking cup.

The novel features of the invention, among others, include mechanisms and arrangements for producing the following movements or effects, which may be more or less according to the following sequence (see Fig. 1)

(1) A figure, as a salesman or clerk, who may be a drink dispenser, turns toward the wall and apparently grasps an article, such as a bottle, and places it in a difi'erent position, letting go of it and later again grasping it and returning it to its original. position.

(2) Another figure (as a drinker at the counter) takes the article and tilts it, as if pouring the contents into a glass, the arm of this figure having a compound movement. A figure as the one sitting at table. or the one at the counter) tilts an article such as a bottle.

(4) A figure (as at lunch counter) apparently lifts an article of food to its mouth and releases it, the arm returning to lowcred position without the article, which disappears, apparently in the mouth of this figure.

(5) The quadruped raises up on its haunches and bends its forepaws, a compound movement taking place.

The raising of an arm of a figure to the mouth, as the lunch counter figure, the seated figure, the figure at the counter, and the policeman (behind the window).

(7) The movement of an arm of a person relative to a movable object, moving the latter to lift it or tilt it (as the policeman, the lunch-counter figure, and the standing customer) (8) The raising of a window apparentl by one of the figures (the policeman behind the window).

(9) The movement of both arms of a figure to perfoim different functions, as out ing with one hand and drinking with the other or pouring with one hand and drinking with the other (as all three customer figures).

(10) The movement of the arm of a. figure and the turning of its head (as the police man).

\Vhile the above are a few of the move-- ments or effects produced by the several figures individually, yet these figures cooperate to produce resultant effects and illu sions, and are operated in part simultaneously and in part successively and in synchronism and order, in order to produce the effect of a play, scene or act.

Another feature of the invention is that the moven'ients of the figures are controlled by several motors or clock mechanisms, a part of the movements being caused by one mechanism and other movements by another mechanism, the action being successive, one clock mechanism controlling the starting of the movement of another. Means is also provided to cause intervals of time to elapse between successive complete poil ornmnces. This last means controls the starting of one moior-mechanism, which in turn controls another molor-1nechanism. The figures are thus synchronized to perform their movements in proper order. After the play or act is completed, there is an inlerval of inaction or an intermission, and then a reeommencemenl ofthe performance; and lhe iii-- lerval may be employed lo show the wane of the merchant in whose store-window the apparatus being displayed for advertising purposes. A phonograph ma) be used not only as an accompaniment to the play, but also during the interval between performances to assist in displaying the advertisers goods to the crowd rolleel'ed by the apparatus of the invention.

The object of the invention is lo secure the novel effects above described b v th mechanism, constructions and arrangemenlx hereinafter described and herein illllt' tlfillil and as covered in the claims.

The specific embodiment of theinvention i no between successive illustrated si milates an old-time hai room or saloon baring therein the fi ures of types of persons frequenting such p 'laces, the figures being constructed and arranged to produce the ejlj'ects, impressions and illusions above referred to, with the purpose and actual. result as proved in przu'tice of holding such old customs up to ridicule. Before tics ribing in detail the specific mechanism or mechanisms eni iiloyed to actuate the several figures, there will be briefly outlined the general arrangement, operation and effects of the device when thus embodied. as

a bar-room scene.

The apparatus (Fig. 1) comprises a box-- like structure open on one side. A view into the box from the open side shows an interior of a saloon. At the left is a bar with the usual furnishings, such as bottles, cash reg ister. etc. A figure representing a bartender is, behind the bar and seems at the com ,inencement ot' the play) to he just about to take an order from inmther igure, representing a customer in front out the bar.

At the rear of the room is a closed window with a stein or glass resting on the sill.

At the right center of the scene is the figure of an oldtimer seated at a table; this figure holds, and continues throu bout to hold, a bottle in its right hand an a glass in its left.

To the right of the figure at the table there is a figure of a do and behind the dog in the rear corner of tie room the figure of a man stands before a lunch-counter.

Behind the closed window is the figure of a policeman, which does not come into View of the spectators until the Window is raised.

The action of the play takes about one minute, approximately, with an intermission of about two minutes, approximately, la s, a complete cycle (play and intermission taking about three mirmtes.

The movements of the several figures are controlled and caused by three clock mechanisms 1. 2 and 3 mounted on the rear of the rear wall of the box, Fig. 2; one of the clocks 1 being controlled b a fourth or masster clock 4, also mounted on the rear of the rear wall. Action of clock .1 starts the action of clock 2 at a redetermined time, while i he action of clocf 2 starts the action of clock 3. Each of these actions slightly overlaps one another, so that there is suhstantially continuous action during the one minute of the play.

Clocks 1 2 and 3 having come to rest after the minute interval, await the start of the action again by the master clock 4 which controls clock 1. y

The action of the lay is as follows. The figure of the barten er turns to the rear of the bar, raises its arm and apparently grasps a. bottle which is standing on the rear shelf.

it then faces lront. bringing the bottle with it, and places it in front of the customer. The .hartenders arm now drops away from the bottle. The right: arm of the customefls figure now moves forward and its right hand grasps the bottle, tilting it by a rotation oi the hand, then apparently pouring a driul: from the l'iottle into the glass held in the lett hand. The customer now returns the bottle to an upright position, and his right arm moves back, releasing the bottle. The bartender then again raises his arm and appijirently grasps the bottle, and turning places it on the rear shelf. As the bartender turns away from the customer. the custon'icr raises the glass in his left hand to his mouth and apparently drinks; and as the bartender faces front. the customer returns his glass to the bar. The foregoing action of the bar tender and the customer is controlled by clock 1. This clock also controls the movement of the right arm of the figure at the lunch counter, the mechanism controlling its arm being connected to the n'lechanism con-- trolling the harteuders arm, so that each time the bartender figure raises its arm the lunch counter figure raises its arm also and drinks from the glass in its hand.

The action of clock 2 begins as the bartender faces the customer the second time.

Clock 2 actuates the lunch counter figure, which begins to simulate the .customers eating of oysters, raising them to its mouth with its left hand, each oyster apparently disappearing into the mouth as the left hand returns to the plate of oysters on the lunch counter. This action oi. eating oysters continutes during the entire operation of clock 2, and is extraordinarily realistic.

Clock 2 also controls the actions oi the oldtimcrs figure seated at the table, and ot the dog. The dog first sits up on its hind legs while its front legs bend at the joints so that the tigure assumes a. begging atti tude directed toward the olt ltimer. The latter now tilts the bottle in its right hand,

as if to pour a drink into the glass in its left hand, then returns it to vertical position and raises its left arm and apparently drinks from the glans. The dog and tigljlrc at the table then repeat their movements successively.

This completes the action of clock about the time the oldtimers ligln'e at the table finishes drinking from the action. of clock 3 begins, which causes the lower sash oi the window at the rear to be raised by the figure of the policen'ia revealing the latter. lts right arm moves forward, and, apparently, graps the drinking cup on the window sill and raises it to its mouth and drinks trom it. It then returns the cup to the sill. The head then turns, iuiiparently tor a look of caution up the street or alley. The d rinltiug operation ill) releases the mechanism of clock 1.

The novel actions and illusions caused and depicted by the apparatus are so extremely realistic and independent of operating means as to cause the spectator to wonder how it is accomplished. For instance, the bartender apparently conveys the bottle to the customer and releases it while the customer grasps and tilts it; then the bartender returns the bottle to the rear shelf. The figure atthe lunch counter apparently eats oysters which he conveys to his mouth by his left hand. and, as the oyster seems to disappear in its mouth, the arm returns to obtain another oyster. Then the policeman, after the window is raised. apparently takes hold of the glass and raises it to its lips, returning the glass to the sill and leaving it standing there after the window is closed. The mechanism employed causes the several movements of the tigu to produce the above'described effects. This mechanism now will be described in detail.

The apparatus comprises (see drawings) a boXlike member A (Fig. 1) open at the front and simulating the interior of a room, in the present case the interior of a saloon.

Back of the rear wall of box A is mounted (Fig. 2) the master clock 1, and clocks 1, 2 and. 3. Above the master clock 4 is located a control O by which the operation can be started or stopped. This control comprises a knob 5 fixed to the end of shaft 6 to which is secured a stop pin 7 and a blade 8. When the clock l is stopped, the blade 8 is in the path of a wind governor 4:, which is part of the clock mechanism. When the knob 5 s rotated counter-clockwise and placed in JliG positionv shown in Fig. 2 in broken lines, the wind governor is free to turn. One of the wheels of the clock 4 (which runs continuously when released by the knob) has three pins 1 mounted thereon which successively engage an ear 9 on a lever 9 pivoted at 9" and connected by a. link 9 to the detent or re ease 1" in the path of the wind governor 1 of clock 1. Everv time t i" passes the ear 9, the detent 1" aised, atarting the mechanism of clock 1. This is approximately e ery three minutes. Clocks 2 and 3 also have wind governors and 3 respectively, which are released by raising their levers or detents 2" and 3" out of their way. Clock 1 controls clock 2, and the latter controls clock 3. As each detent- 1". 2", 3" controlling a wind governor is raised. a finger 13 on each is raised out of a notch 14; in a disk lt associated with each clock 1, 2, 3 and rotated thereby. lVhen any disk 14 completes one revolution, the finger 13, which rides on the of the disl:

drops into a notch 14:, and the detent intercepts the governor and stops the clock. Each of the notched disks 1 1 of clocks 1 and 2 carries a finger 15 which releases the detents 2", 3" in sequence, so that after the disk 14 on clock 1 has made almost a revolution, its finger 15 trips the detent 2", releasing clock 2. Similarly, when the notched disk 14 on clock 2 has made almost one revolution, the finger 15 on this disk trips detent 3", which releases clock 2).

'llhe action of the figures of the bartender B and of the customer at the bar is controlled by clock 1 through the medium of five cams located atthe rear of clock 1 (see Figs. 4: and These cams 10, 11, 12, 13, 1 1 are mounted on a common shaftrotated by clock 1 and act on levers 15, 16, 17, 19 and 18 respectively, on rock shafts 20, 21, 22, 24 and 23 respectively mounted on the framework. These rock shafts have secured to them dependiirqlevers 16, 17, 19 and 18 respectively, which are held under tension in one position by s 'irings 15", 16", 17", 19" and 13" respectively (see Figs. 2, 3 and 6), which return them to normal position after being actuated by the cams and then released. Cams 10 and 11 are double cams adapted to actuate the levers 15 and 16 twice during a revolution of shaft 10.

Lever 15 (Figs. 3 and 6) is connected by a rod 15 to a lever 15 on the end of a shaft 15 (Fig. 10) which carries a gear 15 which meshes with a pinion 15 secured to a hollow shaft 15" on which the figure of the bartender P) is mounted. Actuation of the foregoing train causes bartender l to turn to the rear, rotating- 180. Mounted on the front of the figure of bartender lis :1 rectangular frame (Figs. 6. l0-13) in which is pivotally mounted a hook 3.1 which, when the bartender rotates 136, engages an angular bottle support 32 freely pivoted at its lower end around the shaft 15. This support 32 projects upwardly and through a semicircular slot 32 (Fig. 6) in the rear shelf, and when in the forward position pro jects through a semicircular slot 32" in the bar. as illustrated in broken lines Fig. 6. The bottle 32 is pivoted to the upper end of the support 32 above the rear shelf and is held upright by a spring 3 1.

As bartender B completes its movement to the rear, the hook 31 automatically enpages the horizontal portionof bottle sup-- port 32. As bartender B returns in the re verse direction (under the influence of spring 15". the double cam 10 having released lever 15"). the carrier 32 and bottle are carried around with him to the front, and placed upon the bar. Before the return movement. the bartenders pivoted right arm l6 is raised (moving; around an axis near the shoulder). By the arm movement, the bantcnder appears to grasp bottle. 3?. This drinking. For this purpose, cam 43 (Figs. 2, 18 and 19) engages bell crank 43 connected by link 48 to rock shaft 43. On rock shaft 48 islever 43 which is connected by rod 43 to bell crank 48 connected by rod 48 to lever 43 connected in turn to pivoted left arm 0. Cam 44 next engages bell crank 41, which causes the dog to repeat its action.

Clock 2 also causes figure L at lunch counter to simulate the eating of food such as oysters as follows (see Figs. 14-16) On the back of clock 2 is a gear 45 which meshes with pinion 46 secured to one end of shaft 47 which rotates as long as clock 2 is going. Shaft 47 carries a bent rod 48, on the outer end of which is, a disk representing, say, an oyster 49. Disk 49 moves in a circular orbit, and as it comes up towards the mans mouth, rod 48 engages a spring catch 50 secured to the pivoted left arm 50 of the figure, raising the arm until the hand and disk 49 are about up to the mouth. Arm 50 then strikes a stop 51, which allows rod 48 to pass spring catch 50 on the arm and the arm drops back to its first position. The disk 49 continues on around through an opening 5O through'the mans head (so that: the oyster apparently passes into his mouth) and through. a circular groove 5O at the rear of the figure, when it picks the arm up again.' At the front of figure L is a table 50 onwhich is a dish having the representation of a supply of oysters thereon. The dish and table have an opening 50 through which rod 48 is raised to simulate a picking up of the food 49. The arm 50 is pivoted at the shoulder on an axis coincident with the axis of shaft 47 Clock 3 operates the figure of a policeman P (Figs. 2 and 20). This clock carries a series of cams 51, 52, 53 and 54. \Vindow 51 (Fig. 20) is raised by cam 51, which engages bell crank 51 connected through rod 51 to lever 51 fulcrumed at 51 and connected through rod 51 to the window 51, the policemans left arm 51 being pivoted at the shoulder and connected to the window to move therewith to effect the illusion of the policeman opening the window. Window 51 is held open by cam 51 during the movements of Figure P and caused by cams 52, 53, 54. The policemans right arm 52, Which is pivoted at the shoulder, is raised (to simulate drinking) by cam 52 which engages lever 52 connected by rod 52' (also Fig. 8) to bell crank 52 connected in turn through rod 52 to lever 52 connected to the pivot of arm 52.

The policemans pivoted head 53 is then turned (Figs. 2, 3 and 20) by cam 53, which engages lever 53' connected through rod 53 to lever 58 on rock shaft 53 (Fig. 20) on the upper end of which the policemans head 53 is mounted. This makes it appear as if the policeman is turning his head to look down the back alley. Cam 54 then engages lever 52, which repeats the operation of raising arm to drink after the figures head is returned toward the window. Then cam 51 allows window 51 to close. This completes the play or performance. Arm 52 (Fig. 20) has a curved longitudinally extending hole 55 slidably receiving rod 50 which is attached at its opposite end to glass 57 on the window sill on the other side of window 51, which is cut away at 58 to allow the rod 56 topass through when the window is closed. This allows a relative motion or a lost motion of the arm before it picks up the stein and carries out the illusion of the policeman reaching for the stein, raising it and setting it down and releasing it.

In Fig. 2 an auxiliary means is shown for initiating the operation independently of master clock 4;. This means comprises a handle (30 connected to release 1 and which, when pulled down, raises the release 1" and releases fly l on clock 1 to start the clock.

I claim:

1. The combination with a box constructed to simulate the interior of a room, visible from outside the box like the stage of a theater, and having a sliding window in one side; of a pair of figures of persons located near one another in one part of the room together with a movable representation of an article, one of said figures being rotatably mounted and having a movable arm and the other figure having movable arms one of which arms is provided with a rotatable hand; means for actuating said figures whereby a nmvement of one figure places said article in front of the second figure and removes it from such position; and for actuating the second figure to simulate a pouring from the article and a drinking by the second figure; other figures of other persons in the room and having mo able arms, means actuating said arms to simulate eating and drinking; a mechanically operated figure of a quadruped, and means for actuating it in synchronism with the movements of one of said figures; a figure of a person behind said window, means for actuating said figure and window; and mechanism controlling said several actuating means to cause the actuation of the figures in a predetermined order.

2. The combination with a platforn'i constituting a miniature theatrical stage; of a plurality of mechanically operable figures thereon representing actors having movable members, a plurality of movable articles including drinking vessels for pseudo eating and drinking and respectively associated with the several figures, and means for actuating the movable members of said figures and the movable articles in a predetermined order or sequence to simulate the eating and drinking by the figures of and from the llltl lllU articles by said figures imparting the impression of a succession of part-s of a theatrical performance with succesive actions-0f the various individual actors.

3. The combination with a box simulating a room and constructed to have its interior visible from outside as a stage of a theater, of a plurality of mechanically operable fig ures representing actors located near one another in one part of the room, a plurality of mechanically operable figures located near one another in another part of the room, movable articles for pseudo-eating adjacent the ,figures in front of the room, movable articles for psendo'drinking adjacent the figures in the other part of the room, said figures in both parts of the room having movable arms arranged to be movable to simulate eating and drinking of said articles and service therefor; and means for actuating said figures in a predetermined order or seuence to effect such simulation imparting t 1e impression of a succession of parts a theatrical performance with successive actions of the various individual actors. 4. Thecombination with a box simulating the interior of a room and having a movable window shield, of a movable article Slllllil'rlli' ing a drinking vessel supported apparently on the windowifsill inside the room; a figure located on the other side of? the window, simulating a person and having movable arms and a pivoted head, one of the movable arms of the figure being operatively connected to the movable window shield; the other movable arm of the ligure being operatively connected to the drinking vessel; and mechanism operating the arms and head of the fl me, first mov'ng the window shield to reveal the exterior gurefrom the room interior and apparently permit access of the figure to the drinking vessel, and then alternately to move the drinking cup to simulate drinking and turn the figures head, and finally to restore the drinking vessel and window shield to their normal positions, leaving the drinking vessel in sight and again concealing the exterior figure.

5. The combination with a scene representing a place of drinking, of a plurality of figures of persons located at different port ons of the scene but having no other apparent ce-operative relation to one another; said figures having a movable arm; members sin'lulating drinking receptacles and severally located within reach of said movable arms of the several figures; means ope-ating simultaneously toward the mouths oi. the figures, the arm of each figure and the receptacle within reach of said arm, to simulate drinking; and means causing such operation of the figures and their articles to be successive.

6. The combination with a plurality of mechaniially ope able tigures representing animate beings, oil a plurality of? clock mechanisi'ns, actuating connections between the respective clocks and respective figures, dctents interposed between the clocks to start and stop them successively, and a master clock for controlling the operation of said clock mechanisms to start and stop them successively and operate the :ligures in a predetermined order, and for causing an interval of time between successive complete actuations of the several figures.

7. The combination with a plurality of: mechanically operable figures representing actors, of a plurality of clock mechal'iisms, actuating connections between the respective clock mechanisms and the respective figures, and means for successively starting the operation of the clocks imparting the impression of a succession of parts of a theutrical performance with successive actions of the various individual actors.

8. The combinatioi'i with a plurality of meehanicallv operable figures I'BlDlQSQlllllllQ, animate l'ieii'igs, of motor mechanisms for actuating said ligures in a predetermined order, means controlled by one motor mechanism to control, another to cause their successive operation, and a master control for said motor mechanisms for causing an. interval of time between successive complete oporatirms oi the entire ap niratus.

f). The combination with a figure of a pm son having two arms one ot which is bodily movabh-rand the other of wl'lich has a hand mo \"ably secured to it, oi a tiltable bottle and a movable drinkin 'ecept .e, means independent of the figure and supporting the bottle in po ition engaged by said movable hand; the drinking receptacle being a to the end oi the movable arm; means I ingthe mo mliile hand to engage the bottle to tilt it toward the receptacle to simulate pouring from the bottle to the rcciuitncle; means moving the movabl arm and the re ceptacle secured to it toward the mouth of the figure to simulate drinking from the receptacle; and means causing such operation of the movabh arm and movable hand to he successive :in the (n'der spcciiied.

It). The combination with a ligm'c of a person mounted to swing on a vertical axis, of. an article mounted for revolutionary swinging movement about the axis oi said figure; said lignro initially iacing away from said article and being movable independently of the article; means swinging the figure independently o l movement oi the article to face the latter; the figure having a movable arm: means moving the arm toward the article simulating asping the article by the figure; the article and tigure being constructed tor (o-operative engagement; means co-operatively connecting the figure and article together; means swinging both together to the initial position oi the figure; means disconnecting the figure and article from one another; and means moving the arm from the article.

11. The combination with a plurality of mechanically operable figures representing actors, of motor mechanisms actuating said figures in a predetermined order, and means controlled by one motor mechanism for con trolling the operation of the other motor mechanisms imparting the impression of a succession of parts of a theatrical performance with successive actions of the various individual actors.

12. The combination with a figure of a person, an arm and hand of which figure are movable, of an article movably mounted adjacent said figure, a support for said article, means for moving said arm to engage the article, and means for actuating said hand to move the article.

13. The combination with a figure of a person, of a movable article adapted to he apparently grasped by the hand, a movable support for said article independent of said figure, and means for moving an arm of the figure to a position near said article and then changing the position of the article by moving the support and simultaneously moving the figure and simulating movement of the article by the figure.

14c. The combination with a figure of a person, of-a movable article, a movable support for said article independent of said figure, and means for relatively actuating said figure and article to bring them into juxtaposition to simulate a grasping of the article by a hand of the figure, means for causing a movement of the article and means for causing a movement of the figure, said two means being operable simultaneously to simulate a movement of the article by the hand.

15. The combination with a figure of a person, an arm thereof being mounted for shoulder movement, of a movable article, amovable support for said article independent ot said figure, means for relatively actuating said arm and article respectively and simultaneously to bring them into uXtaposition to simulate a grasping of the article by the hand of the figure, and means for causing a subsequent movement of the figure and article respectively and simultaneously to simulate a movement of the article by the hand of the figure.

16. The combination with a figure of a person, of a movable article, a movable support for said article independent of said figure, means for relatively actuating the figure and article respectively to bring them into juxtaposition to simulate a grasping of the article by the hand of the figure, means for causing a subsequent movement of the figure and article respectively and simultannQUSlV to simulate a movement of the article by the hand, and means for causing a subsequent reverse relative movement of the article and figure respectively and simultaneouslyto simulate a release of the article by the hand of the figure.

1.7. The combination with a figure of a person, said figure having an arm mounted for shoulder movement, of a movable article, a movable support for said article independent of said figure, means for relatively actuating said arm and article respectii ely and simultaneously to bring them into juxtaposition to simulate a grasping of the article by the hand of the figure, means for causing subsequent movements ol the figure f and article respectively and simultaneously to sin'mlate a movement of the article by the arm, and means for subsequently causing a reverse relative movement of the arm and article respectively and simultaneously to simulate a release of the article by the hand of the figure.

18. The combination with a small article, ot a support thcrel'ior, a figure of a person facing away from said article, said figure being mounted for turning movement and having an arm mounted for shoulder movement, means for turning said figure to :tace the article, and means for actuating said arm to move the same towards the article to simulate the grasping of the article by the hand of the figure.

if). The combination with a small article, of a support therefor, a figure of a person :lacing away from said article, said figure being mounted for turning movement, means for turning said figure to face the article and bring the arm of the figure in juxtaposition thereto to simulate a grasping thereof by the hand of the figure, and means for causing thereupon sinniltaneous movements of the figure and article respectively.

20. The combination with a small article, of a support therefor, a figure ot' a person facing away from said article, said figure being mounted for turning movement, means for turning said figure to face the article and bring the arm of the figure in uxtaposition thereto to simulate a grasping thereof, means vtor causing a reverse turning movement of the figure, and means independent of said last-nan'ied means for causing a movement of said article simultaneously with the turning movement oi. the figure.

21. The combination with a movable article, of a support therefor on which it is movable, a figure of a person, said figure being movable independently of said article, and means for connecting and disconnecting said article to and from said figure, whereby a grasping and releasing of said article by the hand of the figure is simulated during movement.

The combination with a movable a1 Li U ticle, of a support therefor on which it is movable, a ti ure of a person, said figure being rotatab e on a vertical axis independently of the article, means for rotating said figure, and means for connecting said article to said figure for movement therewith,

23. The combination with a movable article, of a support therefor on which it is movable, a rotatable figure of a person, said figure having an arm simulating the grasping of said article by the hand of the figure, means for connecting the article to the fig ure, means for rotating the figure while the article is connected thereto, and means for releasing the article from the figure to allow movement of the figure independent of the article. i

4;. The combination with a movable artice, of a su port therefor on which it is movable, a re atable figure of aperson, said figure having an arm mounted for shoulder movement, means for actuating said arm relatively to said article to simulate the grasping of the article by the hand of the gure, means for connecting the article to to figure means for rotatlng the article while it IS connected to the figure, and means for actuating the arm to simulate the iielease of the article by the hand of the gure, a

25. The combination with a movable artiole, of a support therefor, a rotatable figure of a erson, said figure having an arm mounted or shoulder movement and facing away from said article, means for rotating said figure to ace said article, means for actuating said arm to position it to simulate the rasping of the article by the hand of the gure, means for connect ng the article to the figure, means for actuating said fi' ire and article simultaneously to change tieir positions, by rotatin the figure to its initial position, means or lowering said arm away, from the article and raising it again, means for again rotating said figure to return said article to its original position, means again lower' said arm means to release said article rom said hgure, and means returning the figure to its'lnitial position.

26. The combination with a figure representing a person and mounted to swin on a vertical axis; of an article mounte for revolutionary swinging movement about the axis of said figure; said figure being movable inde endently of the article; said article and figure being constructed for co-o erative engagement; means swinging t e figure to and fro on its vertical axis; means connecting said article and figure together causing swinging revolutionary movement of the article by the swinging rotary movement of the figure in one direction; and means disconnecting the article and figure from one another permitting swinging rotatory movement of the figure in the other direction unaccompanied bytbe article.

27. The combination with a figure of a person mounted to swing on a vertical axis, of an article mounted for revolutionary swinging movement about the axis of said figure; said figure having an arm and hand movable toward the article; means moving the arm to simulate grasping of the article by the hand of the figure; the figure and article being constructed for co-o 'ierat-ive engagement; means (JOIIIlGCtlIIg the figure and article together; means swinging figure and article together; means disconnecting the figure and article; and means independ ent of the figure for moving the article.

28. The combination with a pair of figures representing persons, of a movable bottle and a movable drinking vessel; means connecting one figure to the bottle; means moving said figure and bottle together toward the second figure, the bottle and drinking vessel being then in proximity to one another; means disconnecting said figure from the bottle; means connecting the bottle and second figure together; means moving the second figure and bottle together simulating pouring from the bottle to the drinking vessel; means connecting the second figure and the drinking vessel; and means moving the second figure and drinking vessel together simulating drinking from the vessel by the second figure.

29. The combination with a pair of fi ures representing persons, of a movabe article, each figure being mounted to move with the article and provided with means permitting its co-operative connection with the article; means moving the article together with one of the figures into position permitting cooperative connection of the second figure with the article; means disconnecting the article and first figure; and means eilecting such cooperative connection between the article and the second figure and etlecting simultaneous movement of the article by movement of the second figure.

30. The combination with a pair of tigures representing persons, of a movable bottle, means connecting one oil? said figures with the bottle; means siu'iulating grasping of the bottle by said figure; means causing simultaneous movement oii said figure and bottle, by which the latter is moved. to a position within reach of the second figure, the second fi ure lJfilll Jrovided with a movable arm and hand; means moving the arm to cause the hand to engage and simulate grasping o'f thebottle; and means causing the figure to tilt the bottle snnulatlng pouring therefrom.

01. The combination with a rotatable ligure of a person, a second figure having a movable arm and a rotatable hand, a mov able article normally located behind said first figure; means for rotating said first figure to cause it to tace the article and simulate a grasping of said article by the hand of said figure, means for returning'the said first figure carrying with it the article to place the article in front of and adjacent the second figure and between the two fig ures, means for disengaging the first figure from the bottle, means for actuating the arm of the second figure to engage said arti- :terent position.

33. The combination with a figure ot a person, said figure having arms mounted for shoulder movement, one of said arms having a hand holding a representation of a receptacle and the other arm having a rotatable hand, a second figure of a person, which is rotatable and facing said first figure and having an arm mounted for shoulder movement, an article movably mounted behind said second figure, means for rotating said second figure toward said article and raising its arm to simulate a grasping of the article, means for connecting said second figure and article for simultaneous movement; means for rotating said second figure to its said initial, position, placing the article in front of the first figure, and lowering the arm of the second figure; means synchronized to move the arm of the first figure (holding the receptacle) thereafterto position to grasp the article with the rotatable hand of said figure; means rotating said hand, tilting the article toward said receptacle and returning the article to upright position and releasing it; means for again raising the arm of the second figure to grasp the article and returning it to original position; means for lowering the arm of the second figure and releasing the article, returning said second figure to original position; and means for actuating the other arm of the first figure to simulate adrinking from said receptacle. I

34; The combination with a pair of movable figures of persons, of a movable bottle and movable drinking vessel; means for moving one of said figures to simulate grasping said bottle; means moving said figure and the bottle simultaneously to move the bottle to a position within reach of the sec ond figure; the second figure having both arms movable; means for causing the first figure to release the bottle; means moving one arm of the second figure to tilt the bottle over the drinking vessel and simulate decanting, and means moving the other arm of said second figure to raise the drinking vessel and simulate drinking therefrom.

S5. A figure ot a (piadruped, having its hind quarters lined in sitting position, its body pivoted to the hind quarters, the upper ends of its front legs pivoted to the body and its i'ore-pa\\s loosely pivoted to the lower ends of the trout legs, the trout legs and tore-paws extending substantially straight down to the level of the hind quarters, the tore-paws supporting the front of the body in normal sitting position; and mechanism moving the body on its pivot with the hind quarters to a more nearly vertical position and substantially simultaneously moving the front legs on their pivots with the body to substantially horizontal positions, the loose pivots ot the fore-paws permitting the tore-paws to remain by gravity in vertical altho elevated positions, the whole permitting simulation ot a begging attitude .of the quadruped.

36. The combination with a figure of a person, said figure having a pivoted arm, of a rotatable member having a representation of an article of food thereon, means for cans-- ing a simultaneous movement of said arm and member towards the mouth of the figure, and means for releasing the member and arm when they arrive at a position near the mouth of the figure.

37. The combination with a representation of a receptacle of food having an opening therethrough, of a figure of: a person, said figure having an opening through the head at one side of the mouth, and having also a pivoted arm; a member rotatable on an axis coincident with the pivot of the arm of the figure, and having a representation of an article of food at one end, said member being rotatable through said opening in the head of the figure; means for causing said rotatable member to swing the arm of the figure on its pivot toward the mouth of the figure; and means for releasing the arm and allowing its return.

38 The combination with a figure representing a person, and having an arm pivoted at the elbow and having its hand end nor mally located substantially at table height; of a member simulating an article of food and mounted to make complete revolutions in the plane of the mouth of the figure and the hand end of the pivoted arm thereof; the hand end of the arm being reciprocablo between its normal location and the mouth of the figure; means for moving the arm and the food member together from the normal position of the hand end of the arm to the mouth of the figure; and means effectuating the return of the hand end of the arm to its normal location when the food member has reached the mouth of the figure.

39. The combination with a sliding member representing a window-sash, of a figure on one side of the window and having pivoted arms and head, means for actuating one arm and the window-sash to open the latter to disclose the figure, a representation of a container having a sliding connection with the other arm of the figure to allow relative movement of arm and container; means for actuating said arm and container, and means for actuating the pivoted head of the figure.

40. The combination with a sliding windowlike partition, of a figure of a person. said figure being located at one side of said partition and having a movable arm and movable head, an article at the opposite side of said partition from said figure and having a lost motion connection with the movable arm of the figure; means for opening said partition, and means for alternately actuating the arm and head of said figure.

41. The combination with a plurality of figures of persons and a plurality of artineously moving the arms of one figure and an article within reach of said arm; means simultaneously moving the arm of another figure and another article within reach of said arm; and means causing the operation of said respective means at difierent times.

42. A figure of a quadruped in combination with a support therefor which is perforated beneath the hind quarters of the figures, the body of the figure being movably connected with its hind quarters and forward portions of the figure being movably connected with the body; and operating mechanism located below said support, extending thru the perforated portion of the support and connected with the movable body and the movable forward portions thereof.

CLARENCE T. HUNT.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US6039625 *Oct 23, 1998Mar 21, 2000Wang; MaiInteractive and animated mini-theater
US6192215 *Mar 20, 2000Feb 20, 2001Mai WangInteractive and animated mini-theater and method of use
Classifications
U.S. Classification40/419, 446/83, 40/420, 446/304
International ClassificationA63H13/00, A63H13/02
Cooperative ClassificationA63H13/02
European ClassificationA63H13/02