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Publication numberUS1629287 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 17, 1927
Filing dateOct 18, 1924
Priority dateOct 18, 1924
Publication numberUS 1629287 A, US 1629287A, US-A-1629287, US1629287 A, US1629287A
InventorsMilligan Seaton K
Original AssigneeAmalgamated Roofing Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Roofing
US 1629287 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

\ i 1,629,287 y 1927' s. K. MILLIGAN ROOFING Original Filed Oct. 18, 1924 a 91,

Jams/afar" Patented May 17, 1927.

UNITED, STATES 1,629,287 PATENT OFFICE.

SEATON K. MILLIGAN, OF CHICAGO, ILLINOIS, 'ASSIGNOR TO AMALGAMATED ROOFIN COMPANY, OF CHICAGO, ILLINOIS, A CORPORATION OF ILLINOIS.

ROOFING.

Application filed October 18, 1924, Serial No. 744,377. Renewed December 24, 1926.

My invention relates to improvements in roofing, and is particularly concerned with improvements in roofing of the so-called prepared type.

The objects of my present invention are:

First, to provide a roofing of prepared roofing material in -which'the light and shadow effect of a wood shingle roof is approximated, or even intensified;

Second, to provide a roofing of prepared roofing material that is not'flat or monotonous in appearance and inwhich the shingles are arranged so that they will not produce the pattern efi'ect common to many roofs formed of prepared roofing;

Third, to provide a roof in which the butts of the shingles appear to be much thicker than they are, therebyproducing the illusion of the light and shadow effect;

Fourth, to provide roofing, of the character described, that is simple in construction, economicalto manufacture and easy to appl and Fina l to provide a novel means for pro ducing roofing of the character described above. I

Other objects of my invention will appear as this description progresses, reference being had to the accompanying drawings in which:

Figure 1 is a side elevation of a roof embodying my invention Fi ure 2 is a perspective view of one of the s ingles used for producing the roofing shown in Figure 1;

Figure 3 is a perspective view of a modified form of shingle;

Figure 4 is a similar view of another modified form of shingle; and

Figure 5 is an elevation of a portion of a roof embodying still another modification of my invention.

Referring to the drawings, my improved roof comprises a suitable foundation 10 of sheathing, or other material, upon which the shingles are arranged in overlapping courses, with the shingles of each course overlappin the joints of the next lower course, as shown in Figure 1. The butt ends of the shingles in each course are staggered with relation to each other, so as to tend to break up any tendency to form a pattern. This staggering may be uniform, as shown in the drawin s, or the distances that the shingles are 0 set, relatively to each other,

may be varied so as more completely to effect this result.

Underlying each top shingle 11 is a second shingle 12, the butt end of which extends slightly downwardly beyond the butt: end of the top shingle. Preferably, the exposed end portion of the underlying shingle is black, or some other dark color.

I prefer to have the exposed surfaces of the upper shingles covered with colored grits, or other suitable surfacing material. In the preferred embodiment of my invention these colored grits, or the surfacing material.

should be lighter in color than the exposed end portion of the lower shingle. I find that shingles, such as describedin my co-pending application, Serial No. 718,830, filed June 9, 1924, are admirablyadapted for this use.

The underlying shingle not only adds to the thickness of the upper Shingle, but when the roof is observed from a distance, the exposed portion of the lower shingle has the efl'ect of increasing the apparent thickness of the upper shingle, so that the observer, in place of seeing two shin les or parts thereof, appears to see a sing e shingle, the butt of which is of very considerable thickness. It will, of course, be understood that the effect produced by the protruding end of the lower shin le can be increased or decreased. if desiredjhy permitting more or less of the lower shingle to project beyond the upper one.

I prefer to make the two shingles l1 and 12 separate from each other and to superimpose them, as shown, when the roof laid. 'lhese shingles may, however, be ccmenied,"'or otherwise secured together, as desired, so that they can he laid as a. single unit. That form of my invention shown in Figure 3 is similar to that of Figure 2, except that the underlying shingle is somewhat shorter than the upper one, being justlong enough to receive the nail that passes through the upper shingle.

In that form of my invention shown in Fi ure '4, I contemplate securing to the butt en' of the upper shingle a very much shortcr shingle or strip 12, so that asingle unit will be produced that will give the same effect as the double shingle or Figures 2 and 3. That form of my invention shown in Figure 5 contemplates making use of a strip 13 of roofing material that has notches H cut in one side at regular intervals, soas to produce projections 15, alternating with the notches. .Thenotches 1 and the projections 15 are of substantially the same width and equal in width to the shingles 11 that are shown in dot and dash, superimposed upon the strip in such manner as to expose the notched edge of the strip sulficiently toproduce the same efi'ect as that produced by the projecting ends of the lower shingles in- Figures 1 to 4, inclusive. A roof built up in-the manner shown in Figure 5 will have substantially the same appearance as that of While I have described the details of con-' struction of the referred embodiments of my invention, it is to be clearly understood that my invention is not limited to these details, but is capable of other adaptations and modifications within the scope of the appended claims.

Having thus described my invention, what I claim is:

1."A roof comprising a plurality of overlapping courses of shingles, the shingles of each course covering the joints between the adjacent shingles of the next lower course, and having their butt ends staggered with relation to the butt ends of the adjacent shingles in the same course, and a second shingle lying beneath each of said shingles and projecting beyond the butt end thereof a suflicient distance to produce an impression of thickness but not appearing as a separate shingle, the projecting portions of said lower shingles being dark in color, each of said second shingles being of substantially the v same width as the shingle above it.

2. A roof comprising a plurality of overlapping courses of shingles, the shingles of each course covering the joints between the adjacent shingles of the next lower course,

and a second shingle lying beneath each of said shingles and projecting beyond thebutt end thereof a suflicient distance to produce an impression of thickness but not appearing as a separate shingle, the projecting portions of said lower shingles being dark in color,each of said secon shingles being of substantially the same width as the shingle above it. v

3. A roof comprising a plurality of overlapping courses of laterally abutting shin- 05 gles, having the butt ends arranged in staggered relationand a strip of roofing material projecting substantially uniformly be yond the butt end of each shingle, the pro.- jecting' portion of said strip being darker in color than said: shingle.

4.An article of manufacture comprising a shingle of prepared roofing material and a strip of roofing material secured to the butt end of said shingle and projecting therebeyond, the outer surface of the projecting portion of said strip being dilferent' in color from the color ofsaid shingle.

5 Applied roofing comprising a plurality of overlapping flexible shingle pieces, each shingle piece having an exposed lower edge, and other pieces underlying-and supporting said lower shingle piece edges, said other pieces being of different color than the shingle piece edges they support andproje'cting out from under said shingle piece edges, the lower edges of said other pieces conforming in contour to the lower shingle piece edges supported thereby, whereby an'individual shadow elfect is produced for each shingle piece.

6. Applied roofing comprising a plurality of overlapping flexible shingle pieces, each shingle piece havingan exposed lower edge, and another individual lower piece underlying and supporting the lower edge of each of said shingle pieces, said other pieces being of different color than the shingle piece edges they support and projecting out from under said shingle piece edges, the lower edges of said other pieces conforming in contour to the lower shingle piece edges sup ported thereby, whereby an individual shadow effect is produced for each shingle piece. i

In witness whereof, I hereunto subscribe my name this 8th day of October, 1924.

SEATON K. MILLIGAN.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5369929 *Feb 1, 1994Dec 6, 1994Elk Corporation Of DallasLaminated roofing shingle
US5426902 *Jun 10, 1991Jun 27, 1995Certainteed CorporationComposite shingle having shading zones in different planes
US5611186 *Nov 30, 1994Mar 18, 1997Elk Corporation Of DallasLaminated roofing shingle
US5660014 *Feb 10, 1995Aug 26, 1997Certainteed CorporationComposite shingle having shading zones in different planes
US5666776 *Aug 30, 1995Sep 16, 1997Elk Corporation Of DallasFor enhancing the appearance of depth of the shingle
US5901517 *May 9, 1997May 11, 1999Certainteed CorporationComposite shingle having shading zones in different planes
US6195951Nov 17, 1998Mar 6, 2001Certainteed CorporationComposite shingle having shading zones in different planes
US6305138Oct 18, 2000Oct 23, 2001Certainteed Corp.Composite shingle having shading zones in different planes
US6523316Oct 23, 2001Feb 25, 2003CertainteedComposite shingle having shading zones in different planes
Classifications
U.S. Classification52/554, D25/139
International ClassificationE04D1/12, E04D1/22
Cooperative ClassificationE04D1/22
European ClassificationE04D1/22