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Publication numberUS1629315 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 17, 1927
Filing dateDec 21, 1925
Publication numberUS 1629315 A, US 1629315A, US-A-1629315, US1629315 A, US1629315A
InventorsMat For Revetment Work
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Mat for revetment work and process of making same
US 1629315 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

MAT FOR REVETMENT WORK AND PROCESS OF MAKING SAME May 17., 1-921.-

Filed Dec. 21; 1925 Patented May 17, 1927.

rs 'r'r SYRUS SHIRLEY scomr, or CARROLLTON,.MISSOUERI, assrenon or onn nnnr rooLAnK E. JACOBY; OF KANSAS CITY, MISSOURI i I MAT FOR REVETMENT WORK AND PROCESS or MAKING SAME? Application filed December This invention relates'to mats foruse in therevetment' of river banks and the like and has for one or its objectsto produce a new 'and' improved 'mat, of combined woven wlr'e and WlllOW or other suitable tre'e' growths or brush, in which the willowand wire as' so intertwined that the latter re liably maintain the former in position and the mat as a whole is as effective as a strictly willow woven mat;

Heretofore, it has been customary in wea' vingimats'to lay a plurality of parallel strips of material and then to intertwine' crosswisefstrips through the first named strips'by passing said cross-wise strips first over and then under the strips first placed in position. It will be apparent that this method of weaving is extremely slow and is, therefore, very high in cost. A second object of the invention is to disclose a new, novel, usefuh eificient' and inexpensive method ofweaving a mat composed of a' combination of willows or the like and w re fabric.

With the ob ects IlZlHlQCllD V1ew,the 1nvention consists in certain fe'aturesof construction and combination of parts as here matter described and claimed; and in order j that it may be fully understood, reference is to be had to the accompanying drawing, in which I Figure 1 is a planview of a mat in the process of construction, illustrating at the right the 'matas' it appears when complete.

Figure 2 is a side view of the mat as shown in Figure 1. Figures 3 to 7- inclusive, illustrate diagrammatically the various steps employed process of Weavmg' in the new and novel In the said drawing, Where like reference characters identity corresponding parts in a'lho fthe figures, a plurality of rolls the number depending 'on the width of the mat; ofsuitable wire mesh 1 of any desired width, weighti and length, are placed along the ground'and unrolled alternately in opposite directionstsee. Figure 3), a distance equal to the width oftlie rows ofmat'mat'erial it is desired to form. The meeting or adjoining corners ofthe wire fabric are tightly tied together by suitable ties 2. V

For convenience in the explanation of the processof' weaving the rollsof'material as firstplaced on the ground will be identified 21, 1925. Seri'aINo. vases.

soon as the'rolls' have; been spaced as shown in Figures 3 and t, the" first r'ow 'r" of wil lows or the like 1V is packed intop'o'sition, it being apparent that practically all sizes of material may beplaced without necessi tating special cutting and that" any thic'lt ness of" mat may be produced by regulating the quantity of material JV placed in position.

v lhe first row to? of material having-been placed, the operators lift the rolls of wire" a to the right, as illustrated it beingevident that each roll a will' be' receivedbe tween a pair otf'rolls b. The rolls 6 are now lifted over the mat material ofroww? and drawn tight the' adjacent corners ofthe rolls a and b (see Figure 1 be corners of the wire fabric are now prefer ably'tightly wired or otherwise secured" together as at 2, as shown clearly in Figural to hold the row y in compacted form.

.The rolls 5 are now carried back over" the row 1 see'Figure 6. and placed be} tween said row y and the row as, the

rolls it being unrolled asufiicient distance for the reception of the row a otnece-ssary mat material. After'the row 2 of matineterial has been placed'the rolls '6, see Figure 7, are hrought o'ver the top of'said row and placed on the'ground betweenthe'rolls' a, and the adjacent corners of the Wirefabric are preferably. tightly wired together asat 2 in Figure 1 to hold said row in' compacted condition. 1

The rolls a are now carried back over the row a, see Figure 7,.and the process of forming the row 1) of mat material is carried out in all respects similar to the process described in connectioniwith Figures Sand 6. A complete cycle o'fop'erations in the method of carrying out the process of the'invention has now been completed.

It will be apparent that the process as-de scribed is continued until a mat of any deits feeding of the completed mat directly off the barge into the desired position, or the mat may be completely woven on the bank and then placed in the most convenient manner, where necessary.

A mat constructed in accordance with the iinvention may be tied, staked or weighted to hold it in position in any of the common and Well known methods now in use. It is desired to emphasize the point that the process of weaving is universal in its character, that is the same process lends itself to use in weaving any thickness of mat with the rows of material of any desired width, and that a continuous mat of any width or length may be just as conveniently woven.

From the above description, it will be apparent that I have produced a mat and process of weaving which possesses all of the features of advantage pointed out as desirable, and while I have described and claimed the preferred form of the invention, I reserve the right to make all changes properly falling within the spirit and scope of the appended claims.

Iclaimz- 1. The process of weaving a mat of mat material and wire fabric comprising the placing of a plurality 'of rows of rolls of fabric alternately unrolled a predetermined distance in opposite directions, compacting a quantity of mat material in the space thus provided between the rows, then alternately unrolling the rolls of one row overthe mat material to bind the same in position, and removing the other row of rolls so that it shall not interfere with the process.

2. The process of weaving a mat of mat material and wire fabric comprising the placing of a plurality of rows of rolls of fabric alternately unrolled a predetermined distance in opposite directions, compacting a quantity of mat material in the space thus provided between the rows, alternately removing the rolls of one from position, and then unrolling the rolls of the other row over the mat material to bind the same in position.

3. The process of weaving a mat of mat material and wire fabric comprising the placing of a pair of rows of rolls of fabric alternately unrolled a predetermined distance in opposite directions, compacting a quantity of mat material in the space thus provided between the rows, then alternately unrolling the rolls of each row to the right and to the left so that the fabric of each row rolls of the first-named row a predetermined distance, compacting materlal on thelength.

of fabric thus exposed, unrolling the rolls of the second-named row over the row of mat material to secure the same in position,

then alternately repeating the process for the full length of the '1nat.-

5. The processof weaving a mat of mat material. and wire fabric comprising the placing of a pair of rows of rolls of fabric alternately unrolled a predetermined distance iii-opposite directions,;securing the adjacent corners of the fabric together, compacting a quantity of mat material in thespace thus provided between the rows, then unrolling the rolls of one row over the mat material to bind the same in position, securing the adjacent edges of the fabric together. and then removing the other row of rolls so that it shall not interfere with the process. 1 v

6. Amat comprising a plurality of parallel rows of mat material, and a plurality of rows of wire fabric placed at right angles to the mat material, the wire fabric of each row alternately overlying and underlying adjacent rows of mat material.

7. A mat comprising a plurality of parallel rows of mat material, and a plurality of rows of wire fabric placed at right angles to the mat material, the wire fabric of each row alternately overlying and underlying adjacent rows of mat material and the rows of wire fabric being so related'that adjacent rows are alternately overlying and underlying any particular row of mat material.

8. A mat con'lprising a plurality of parallel rows of mat material, a plurality of rows of wire fabric placedv at right angles to the mat material, the wire fabric of each row alternately overlying and underlying adjacentrows of mat material and the rows of wire fabric being so related that adjacent rows are alternately overlying and underlying any particular row of mat material, and means securing together the adj acent corners of said wire fabric rows.

In witness whereof I hereunto affix my signature.

SYRUS SHIRLEY SCOTT.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4135843 *Jul 21, 1977Jan 23, 1979Construction Techniques, Inc.Erosion control mat
US4312601 *Feb 20, 1980Jan 26, 1982The Secretary Of State For Defence In Her Britannic Majesty's Government Of The United Kingdom Of Great Britain And Northern IrelandFascines
US4354443 *Nov 10, 1980Oct 19, 1982Dason International Products Inc.Afghan construction and method
US6109835 *Aug 29, 1996Aug 29, 2000Grabhorn, Inc.Biofilter bags for erosion control
US7125204Oct 31, 2003Oct 24, 2006Finn CorporationPortable pneumatic blower
US7275893Mar 19, 2003Oct 2, 2007Finn CorporationApparatuses and methods for dispensing materials
US7811029 *Feb 9, 2007Oct 12, 2010Agrecol, LlcWoven soil stabilization system
US8100220Mar 27, 2009Jan 24, 2012Rexius Forest By-Products, Inc.Vehicle having auxiliary steering system
US20040184889 *Mar 19, 2003Sep 23, 2004Arlen RexiusApparatuses and methods for dispensing materials
US20050095070 *Oct 31, 2003May 5, 2005Doug WysongPortable pneumatic blower
US20080193229 *Feb 9, 2007Aug 14, 2008Graham William TWoven soil stabilization system
US20090242316 *Mar 27, 2009Oct 1, 2009Rexius Forest By-Products, Inc.Vehicle having auxiliary steering system
Classifications
U.S. Classification442/186, 405/17, 139/425.00R, 139/424, 405/19, 28/143, 139/383.00R, 428/457
Cooperative ClassificationD03D15/00