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Publication numberUS1630056 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 24, 1927
Filing dateJul 5, 1924
Priority dateJul 5, 1924
Publication numberUS 1630056 A, US 1630056A, US-A-1630056, US1630056 A, US1630056A
InventorsLeroy J Buttolph
Original AssigneeCooper Hewitt Electric Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Water-cooled lamp
US 1630056 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

M 9 L, J. BUTTOLPH WATER COOLED LAMP Filed. July 5, I924 K0 peratures in the lamp are maintained.

Patented May 24, 1927.

UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE.

LEROY J. BUTTOLPH, OF EAST ORANGE, NEW JERSEY, ASSIGNOR TO COOPER HEWITT ELECTRIC COMPANY, OF HOBOKEN, NEW JERSEY, A CORPORATION OF NEW JERSEY.

WATER-COOLED LAMP.

Application filed July 5,

The present invention relates to electric light radiating apparatus useful in the arts generally and particularly in the therapeutic art where diseases are treated by means of 5 radiations from a light source giving off ultra violet rays, and has for its object to provide such apparatus which can be manipm lated readily by hand by the operator.

l have discovered, when operating a quartz lamp or burner having a solid anode and a liquid cathode therein and an arc path of one or two inches on commercial circuits that it is impossible to maintain such a small sized lamp in etficient operation on commercial circuits without the use of external heat radiating devices. As is generally known in the artthe anode and cathode should be I kept at considerably lower temperature than the arc path and especially the cathode. On

the other hand the arc path and the mercury vapor thereof is required to be kept at a characteristic operating temperature in order to maintain the proper resistance and. pressure of the vapor which serves as the arc path.

A ccordingly, in my new invention, I provide the lamp with apparatus for conducting heat therefrom which functions to maintain the tcm 'ierature of the radiant current stream between the electrodes of the lampat the desired operating temperature for giving the maximum amount ofv light. in those cases where illumination is desired and the maximum quantity of ultra-violet light radiations where said radiations are desired.

'ThiS apparatus functions to maintain the electrodes of the lamp at proper temperatures which functioning as a matter of fact is an adjunct of keeping the are path at its proper operating temperature. In this heat conducting apparatus are (1) a jacket of material which is a good conductor of heat such as a metal, and (2) a poor heat conducting medium such as Bakelite. cement, as

bestos, metal or alloy, having direct contact with both the lamp wall and the jacket wall and having such a suitable proportion of the heat generated in the lamp therefrom that the proper operating temperature or tem- The area, extent, and position of contact of the said medium with the lamp are governed to suit the operating conditions of the lamp. It can be extended substantially throughout the length of the lamp, or it may be limited 1924. Serial No. 724,343.

to points near or at the electrodes of the lamp, or limited to an area about one of them, as, for instance, about the cathode chamber. In this heat conducting apparatus the said jacket is thermally connected with means for dissipating heat substantial ly as fast as it is conducted to it from the lamp. such dissipating means being, for example, a water cell such as I use in an embodiment fully described below and shown in the drawings accompanying this application. The said medium between the jacket and the lamp is of a material of lesser heat conductivity than that of the jacket whereby obtained the result of retaining sufficient of the heatgenerated in thelamp to keep the arc path at its proper operating temperature and of dissipating such quantities-as are in excess of such requirements. So, as in the example of the water cell cited, the heat dissipation rate of the exterior cooling means being of a given capacity and greater than the quantity generated in the lamp the said medium will operate.to conduct heat from the lamp tomaintain the lamp at its proper operating temperature and mternal vapor pressure between certain limits and well between the normal fluctuations of ener delivered by commercial electrical circuits, or by such circuits which are provided with auxiliary regulating. devices. The cooling capacity of the external dissipating means of course can be varied and set to suit the particular conditions under which the lamp is to work by varying in this case the rate of water flow through the water cell. In the preferred embodiment of my lamp I employ said medium between the lamp and jacket in the form of a ring about the cathode chamber thereof. The jacket is formed 'to extend substantially the length of the lamp to receive and conduct heat passed to it by radiation and convection from the body of the lamp. and to cooperate with said intermediate medium in its temperature controlling function.

I find that in supplying a lamp or burner with its customary casing and so on that varying'inanufacturing conditions result in conditions not uniform in the various casings resulting in difi'erent inherent heat conducting and dissipating characteristics and as implied abore I select said heat conducting medium from such materials as Bakelite, cement, asbestos, metal, or an alloy to suit the operating conditions of the lamp and also in accordance with such inherent heat dissipating characteristic of the lamp casing.

As an auxiliary means for conducting heat from the lamp and as readily changeable means for controlling the rate of heat conducted fromthe lamp I use flexible spring fingers contacting thermally with heat dissipating means and provided with means for causing their contact with the lamp or for removing them from contact therewith entirely, and also. for carrying the area of their contact therewith which are fully described below and shown in the drawings. Under certain conditions of the operation of the lamp and with the necessary contact area of the fingers with the lamp should it be desired the fingers alone can be used to conduct the heat from the lamp to suitable heat dissipating means.

I illustrate different forms of my invention in the accompanying drawings in which,

Fig. 1, is a vertical section of my artificially cooled hand lamp showing the heat conducting medium contacting with the greater portion of the outside surface of the lamp and having thermal contact throughout the greater part of the outside surface of said medium and thermal contact through a water cell and also showing flexible fingers in contact with one part of the lamp.

Fig. 2, is a section view along line 22 of Fig. 1.

Fig. 3, is a section view along line 33 of Fig. 2.

Fig. 4, is a section view along line 44 and through Fig. 1 and shows in plan the details of the flexible contacting fingers and means for moving them into and out of contact with the lamp and for varying the areas of said contact.

Fig. 5, is a vertical elevation of a. lamp with the conducting medium thereof formed in a ring about the cathode and a ring about the anode, the lamp being indicated by dotted lines.

Fig. 6, is a vertical elevation of a lamp with a jacket thereabout and a ring of heat conducting material about the cathode of the lamp between the jacket and the lamp.

Referring to the drawings the lamp 1 is surrounded throughout the greater portion of its length by heat conducting medium 2 which is of material such as cement, Bakelite or a low melting alloy and which has a light conducting opening therethrough between its extremities. The lamp is surrounded longitudinally by a' closure comprising the water cell 4 and the casing 7 extending between the lateral extremities of the water cell and around the lamp and extending upwardly from the top and bottom of the water cell. The caps 16 and 17- at the top and bottom of the casing complete the closure for the lamp. The electrical conductors 29 and 30 passing through the easing 7 and insulated therethrough in a suitable manner serve to connect a suitable source of electric current to the lamp through the conductors 26 and 27 which also serve to 7 vanes or fins 14 which also serve as a thermal contact between the jacket 3 and water cell 4. These fins 14 extend substantially the length of jacket 3 and are formed near the light conducting opening of jacket 3 into a reflector and enlarged light conducting passageway as shown at 15 in Fig. 2. At the point of juncture of enlargements 15 of vanes 14 with the inner wall 9 of the water cell 4 is mounted in said wall 9 a lens 6 which for use in the application of ultra violet light is made of silica or some other material transparent to ultra violet light. Registering with lens 6 and said openings in jacket 3 and medium 2 is a lens 5 mounted in the front wall 8 of water cell 4 and which is of similar material to that of lens 6. These lenses have water tight seals between them and the walls in which they are respectively mounted. Through the handle 12 which is fixed to the back of easing 7 are liquid conducting pipes 31 and 32 which serve for connection with a water supply and exhaust. Said pipes 31 and 32 connect through pipes 10 and 11 respectively to the upper part of the water cell 4 on either side of the partition 13 which extends from the top of water cell 4 to the lenses in the front and back walls thereof and which serve to distribute the water through said cell and to insure proper cooling circulation therethrough. On wall 9 at the lower part of water cell 4 are fixed as by soldering. brazing, welding. belting and so on the flexible fingers 22. 23. 24. and 25 which are so fixed at a point intermediate of their lengths and have their ends bent from wall 9 toward that portion oflamp l nearest them. These fingers are of spring material and are formed to tend to spring out of contact or into contact with said lamp 1. The bolt 18 which has a left hand screw at one end and a right hand screw at its other end and threaded through the fingers serves to move said fingers into and out of contact with the, lamp, the right hand screw and the left hand screw cooperating to move the fingers on one side of the lamp cooperatively with a similar movement of the fingers on the other side of Hit culated from the source and to the exhaust through the pipes 31 and 32 and thereby through the water cell 4. With the cooling liquid in circulation, the lamp is started into operation by tilting the outfit so that the mercury of the lamp bridges the gap between the electrodes thereof and then breaks the connection thus established whereupon the arc is formed between said electrodes. At the instant of starting because'of the low temperature in the lamp the voltage drop across it is low andis controlled bya stabilizing resistance in the auxiliaries usual to said lamps and not here shown. This initial current is necessarily high and the mercury of the lamp heats up rapidly raising the vapor pressure of the mercury in the lamp and at the same time raising the arovoltage. This process continues until such time as the heat energy in the lamp establishes equilibrium with the cooling members about the lamp. This equilibrium temperature is determined by the conductivity of medium 2,

Y (and said flexible fingers, when used, conduct heat through their respective thermal contacts to the water cell 4.) It is thus obvious that the volt-ampere characteristic of the lamp is controlled by this control of heat equilibrium through such conduction by means of medium 2 (and fingers 22 to 25) since the volt-ampere characteristic of-the lamp itself is dependent primarily on the pressure of the mercury vapor in the lamp. It follows from the foregoing then that the operation of the outfit for any given set of conditions may be controlled and varied by varying the electrical regulating devices in the auxiliary mechanism of the lamp, but it is preferred for any given setting. of the lampand its control mechanism to vary the volt-ampere characteristic of the lamp by varying the rate of cooling as set forth above.

-tween the lamp 1 and jacket 3 is formed principally about the cathode chamber 34 of lamp 1; the jacket 3 extends about the lamp substantially through its length.

Fig. 5 shows a lamp 1- having the medium forme'l in two parts as one ring 2" about the anode of the lamp and the other ring 2 about the cathode chamber. Both these rings are shown as being tapered to fit the interior of the jacket 3. v

I claim as my invention: 1. In a water cooled lamp, in combination, a lamp holding tube, a water, cell. heat conducting means betweensaid tube and said cell, a light passageway between the ends of said tube and light shielding means adjacent the ends of said tube.

2. In a water cooled lamp, in combination,

'a lamp enclosing tube therefor extending substantially the length thereof, a heat conducting medium within said tube contacting with both the tube and the lamp substantially throughout their contiguous surfaces, said tube and medium having registering light conducting passageways.

I 3. In a water cooled lamp. in combination, a lamp holding tube, a water cell in thermal contact therewith, means for circulating water thrpugh said cell, said tube and cell' having registering light conducting passageways. a casing extending between the sides of said water cell and enclosing said tube.

4. In a water cooled lamp, in combination, a lamp holding tube, a water cell in thermal contact therewith. means for circulating water through said cell. said tube and cell having registering light conducting passageways, a casing extending between the sides of said water cell and around said tube, and caps completing a closure with said water cell and said casing.

5. In a water cooled lamp, in combination, a lamp holding tube, a water cell in thermal contact therewith, means for circulating water through said cell, said tube and cell having registering light conducting passageways, a casing extending between the sides of said water cell and around said tube. and caps completing a closure with said water cell and said casing, a lamp in said tube and electrical conductors for said lamp passing through said closure.

6. In a water cooled lamp, in combination. a lamp holding tube, a water cell in thermal contact with said 'tube, a pair of lenses mounted in openings in opposite Walls of said water cell and registering with said tube aperture. a casing extending between the limits of said cell and about said tube,

caps completing a closure with said casing and cell for said tube, a water conducting passageway to and from said water cell, an electric lamp in said tube and conductors therefor passing through said closure.

7. In combination, with an electric lamp a set of fingers of thermal conductive material, and means for moving said fingers into and out of contact with said lamp and for varying the pressure of said fingers on the lamp.

8. In combination, with an electric lamp, a set of fingers of thermal conductive material, and means for moving said fingers successively into and out of contact with said lamp and for varying the pressure of said fingers on the lamp.

9. In combination, with an electric lamp,

' a set of fingers of thermal conductive material, and means for moving said fingers successively in pairs into and out of contact with said lamp and for varying the pressure of said fingers on the lamp.

10. In a water cooled lamp, in combination, a lamp holding tube, a Water cell in thermal contact with said tube, a pair of lenses mounted in openings in opposite walls of said water cell and registering with said tube aperture, a casing extending between the limits of said cell and about said tube, caps completing a closure with said casing and cell for said tube, a water conducting passageway to and from said water cell, an electric lamp in said tube and conductors therefor passing through said closure, and a pair of fingers of thermal conductive material in thermal contact with said water cell, and means for moving said fingers into and out of contact with said lamp and for varying the area with said lamp.

11. In a water cooled lamp, in combination, a lamp, :1 jacket thereabout and a heat dium having registering light conducting openings therethrough.

12. In a water cooled lamp, in combination, a lamp enclosing tube therefor extending substantially the length thereof, a heat conducting medium within said tube contacting with both the tube and the lamp, said tube and medium having registering light conducting passageways.

13. In a water cooled lamp, in combination, a lamp enclosing tube therefor extending substantially the length thereof, a heat conducting medium within said tube contacting with both the tube and the lamp at their contiguous surfaces about the electrodes of the lamp, said tube having a light conducting passageway through the wall thereof.

14. In a water cooled casing having a mercury vapor lamp, in combination. a lamp enclosing tube having a light conducting passageway through its wall therefor extending substantially the length thereof, a heat conducting medium within said tube contacting with both the tube and lamp at their contiguous surfaces about the cathode chamber of said lamp.

15. In a water cooled lamp, in combination, a lamp, a lamp enclosing tube having a light passageway through the wall thereof, and a heat conducting medium within said tube of a material having a lesser heat conductivity than that of said tube. said medium contacting with said tube and said lamp.

Signed at Hoboken, in the county of Hudson and State of New Yersey, this 3rd day of July, A. D. 1924.

LEROY J. BUTTOLPH.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2927464 *Jan 16, 1956Mar 8, 1960Servo Corp Of AmericaPyrometer
US3075113 *Feb 12, 1960Jan 22, 1963Thompson Nuclear Energy Co LtdRemote inspection equipment
US4000407 *Apr 7, 1975Dec 28, 1976Illumination Industries Inc.Combined infrared filter and light focusing apparatus for a mercury vapor lamp
Classifications
U.S. Classification362/264, 313/17, 313/27, 313/46, 313/50, 313/44, 313/13, 313/28
International ClassificationA61N5/06, A61N5/00
Cooperative ClassificationA61N5/06, A61N2005/0644, A61N2005/005
European ClassificationA61N5/06