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Publication numberUS1633787 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 28, 1927
Filing dateAug 1, 1925
Priority dateAug 1, 1925
Publication numberUS 1633787 A, US 1633787A, US-A-1633787, US1633787 A, US1633787A
InventorsOtto Kress
Original AssigneeAmerican Lakes Paper Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Oil and grease proof paper and container made therefrom
US 1633787 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

v 1,633,787 June 28, 1927. O. KRESS OIL AND GREASE PROOF PAPER AND CONTAINER MADE THEREFROM Filed Aug. 1. 1925 InvG-71237? @25 f7-S566,

y .iQ/:

- UNITED STA `OF APPLETON, WISCONSIN, ASSIGNOR T0 AMERICAN LAKES PAPER COM- Patented I J une 28, 1927.

TES

' OTTO KRESS,

'.PANY, OF CHICAGO, ILLINOIS,

A CORPORATION OF DELAWARE.

OIL AND GREASE PROOF PAPER AND CONTAINER MADE THEREFROM.

Application illed August lThe present invention has primarily for its object the provision of an improved com posite paper sheet adapted to carry olls, lard, grease, and like materials, and to provide an efficient and inexpensive contalner made therefrom, whereby such materials as gasoline, lubricating oil, lard, grease, or the like may be carried, the container being of such cheap construction that after it has been used once it may be discarded.

I have discovered that it is possible to render sheets -of paper impermeable to the passage of oils and grease if such sheets are united together'by a non-drying cement, insoluble in oil and carrying Water in sufiicient quantity to prevent the passage of oil therethrough, this being due to the fact that the `water carried by the cement repels the passage of oil and grease. I have found also that a container made from sheets of paper so united together will for a long period of time effectively serve to retain oils, grease, or the like, the water carried by the cement that unites the sheets repelling the oil or grease, which otherwise would pass through the pores of the paper.

The invention consists in the features of novelty hereinafter described, illustrated in the accompanying drawing and particularly pointed outin the claims at the end of this specification.

Figure 1 is a sectional view showing a composite paper sheet formed of tWo sheets of paper united together in accordance with my invention; Figure 2 is a perspective view showing a bag-shaped container embodying my invention; Figure 3 is a sectional view showing a plurality of sheets of paper united together by an oil and grease proof cement, these sheets being given greater body by having united thereto a sheet of paper board; Figure 4 is a perspective view of a container in the form of a. box or carton made from the composite sheet illustrated in Fig. 8 of the drawing; Figure 5 is a seetional view similar to Fig, 1, but having a paper sheet united thereto by Waterproof cement; and Figure 6 is a view similar to Fig. 3, with an additional sheet of paper united thereto by a waterproof cement.

Referring to Figs. 1 and 2 of the drawing,

1, 1925. Serial No. 47,439.

A and B designate two sheets of paper and C denotes a thin film of adhesive material whereby the sheets will be inseparably united together. The sheets of paper A and B ma be of any suitable character or quality, a though I prefer to employ so-called greaseproof papers, such as are known in the trade under the names of grease proof, glassine and vegetable parchment. In preparing the composite sheet illustrated in Fig. 1, I prefer to apply the adhesive to the opposmg surfaces of two sheets A and B, 1n order to be absolutely sure of a continuous film of such adhesive over the sheets, although if desired, the adhesive C may be applied .to the surface of one sheet of paper only and the other sheet may be then firmly pressed thereon. While I regard it within the broad scope of my invention to employ for uniting the sheets of paper any suitable cement or adhesive that will carry water in sufiicient quantity to prevent the passage therethrough of oil or grease, one preferred adhesive which gives very satisfactory results consists of a strong solution of commereial/glucose which may be varied.in concentration from 40 to 70% of actual Weight of dry glucose; that is to say, the solution may contain from 60 to 30% of Water. In order to render the film more fiexible, there may be added, if desired, from 5 to 30% of glycerine, which will serve to maintain the film in moist condition and prevent the evaporation of the water for a long period. If desired, also, there may be added to the glucose solution from 5 to 30% in 'weight of dry calcium chloride, as this salt is very hygroscopic and Will fend to draw moisture and so maintain the water content of the adhesive for a long period. An adhesive such, for example, as that above described.,

Will be found to be insoluble in oil and to carry Water in sufficient quantity to prevent the passage of oil therethrough, and is, in effect, non-drying. By the term non-drying, I mean that the adhesive is of such character that the moisture thereof will not evaporate or -dry out for a long period of time. v

The composite sheet of paper such as illustrated in Fig. 1 of the drawing may be made u into a variety of 'l'orms of container-s for ods or grease. In Fig. 2, the composite sheet is shown as formed into a bag-like container, the top of which is closed in` any suitable manner and is provided with a lling tube D of suitable material, and having a convenient handle E whereby the bag may he carried. Bags of this character can be very cheaply made, and the material being iexible, can be conveniently stored for use. When such a bag or container is filled with oil (gasoline, for example), it will be found that while the oil will 1n time penetrate the interior sheet, the Water carried by the film of non-drying cement or adhesive will prevent the passage of the oil through the bag. If desired, the outer surface of the ba or container may be covered with an a dtional sheet of pa er such as Kraft paper) pasted thereto an serving to strengthen the bag.

In Fig. 3 of the drawing is shown a composite sheet rendered somewhat heavier than the composite sheet illustrated in Fig. l and better adapted for forming boxes or cartons for containing lard, grease, or other oily materials. This composite sheet is shown as formed of paper sheets A and B united by a film C of oil or grease proof cement as heretotore described, a sheet of paper board A2 being shown as united to the sheet A by a ilm A3 of suitable cement, such as silicate of soda, starch paste, or the like.

In Fig. 4 there is shown a box or carton made from the composite sheet illustrated in Fig. 3. This carton may comprise a body portion of ordinary shape and construction, having end flaps at its top adapted to be turned inward after the boX has been filled.

Tt it is desired to make the container moisture proof, as well as oil and grease proof,

' a further sheet of paper may be connected to the outside of the-container by a thin film of 4asphalt cement. Thus in Fig. 5, I have shown a composite sheet similar to that illustrated in Fig. l, but having an outer sheet A4 united to the sheet of paper A by a thin film Ali of asphalt. So, also, in Fig. 6 is shown a composite sheet similar to that illustrated in Fig. 3, but having an outer sheet A4 united to the sheet of paper board A2 by a thin film of asphalt or equivalent Waterproof cement.

Figures 1, 3, 5 and 6 are necessarily exaggerated in order to show the elements comprising the composite sheets, but it will be understood that the composite sheets shown in Figs. 1 and 5 are suliiciently thin and flexible to permit the formation of baglike containers, and the composite sheets shown in Figs. 3 and 6, while somewhat thicker and somewhat stifler, are sufiiciently iiexible to form cartons or containers such as illustrated in Fig. 4.

My improved composite paper sheet will be found not only sufficiently flexible to enable containers such as above described to be -formed therefrom, but the film or films et' cement en'iployed in uniting the sheets of paper are of such non-drying, flexible character, that it will not become brittle and will not crack when the containers are folded, scored, printed upon or carelessly handled. The composite sheet illustrated in Figs. 1 and 5 of the drawing will be found particularly well adapted in the lining of boxes, barrels, or the ike, that are to contain oils, solid grease, or like materials.

The details above described and the precise character and composition'of the oil and grease proof cement may be varied without departure from the broad scope of the invention.

Having thus described my invention, what I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent is 1. A composite oil and grease proof sheet comprising two sheets of paper permanently united together by a non-drying cement insoluble in oil and carrying water in sufficient quantity to prevent the passage of oil therethrough.

2. A composite oil and grease proof sheet comprising two sheets of paper permanently united together by a non-drying cement insoluble in oil and carrying water in suiticient quantity to prevent the passage of oil therethrough and having a supplemental sheet united thereto by a film of/ waterproof cement.

3. A composite oil and grease proof sheet comprising two sheets of paper united together by a non-drying vcement consisting mainly of glucose and water.

4. A container for oil, lard, or like material comprising sheets of paper united together by a non-drying cement, insoluble in oil, and carrying water in suilicient quantity to prevent the passage of oil therethrough.

5. A container for oil, lard, or like material comprising sheets of paper united together by a non-drying cement, insoluble in oil, and carrying Water in suiicient quantity to prevent the passage of oil therethrough, one of said sheets having a supplemental sheet united thereto by a waterproof cement.

6. A container for oil, lard, or like material comprisinga paper board having upon one side a sheet of paper-united thereto by a ihn of asphalt and having -`united to its other side at least two sheets `.ofpaper con.

nected together by a non-drying cement, insoluble in oil, andearrying water in suiiicient quantity to prevent the passage of oil therethrough.

7. A composite oil and grease proof sheet comprising two4 sheets of paper united together by a non-drying cement consisting mi'nly of glucose, Water and calcium chlori e.

8. A composite oil and grease proof sheet comprising two sheets of paper united together by a non-drying cement consisting mainly of glucose, water, calcium chloride and glycerine.

9. The method of making an oil and grease proof container that consists in interposing between two sheets of paper a nondrying cement inso water 1n' suicient passage of oil therethrough,

incorporating said contamer.

luble in oil and carrying quantity to prevent the and thereafter 10 sheet 1n the form of a OTTO KRESS.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2690838 *Feb 28, 1950Oct 5, 1954Tepper John JCombination toilet tissue package
US5203491 *Oct 17, 1991Apr 20, 1993James River Corporation Of VirginiaBake-in press-formed container
US5573693 *Jul 15, 1993Nov 12, 1996Conagra, Inc.Food trays and the like having press-applied coatings
US5827616 *Jul 19, 1996Oct 27, 1998Sibille DalleCoated greaseproof paper and process for manufacturing it
US20030226648 *Jun 6, 2002Dec 11, 2003Mcdonnell William T.Multiple ply paperboard material having improved oil and grease resistance and stain masking properties and method for forming same
US20150151508 *May 7, 2013Jun 4, 2015Ahlstrom CorporationMultilayer article comprising a biodegradable polymer-based layer and a cellulose-fiber based support; method of manufacturing multilayer article and food accessory comprising a multilayer article
US20160016717 *Mar 19, 2014Jan 21, 2016Ahlstrom CorporationFibrous substrate containing fibers and nanofibrillar polysaccharide
WO1993025057A1 *May 26, 1993Dec 9, 1993Conagra, Inc.Food trays and the like having press-applied coatings
Classifications
U.S. Classification428/34.2, 229/5.81, 428/491, 156/224
International ClassificationD21H27/32, D21H27/30
Cooperative ClassificationD21H27/32
European ClassificationD21H27/32