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Publication numberUS1636357 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 19, 1927
Filing dateMay 22, 1926
Priority dateMay 22, 1926
Publication numberUS 1636357 A, US 1636357A, US-A-1636357, US1636357 A, US1636357A
InventorsCutts Jr Richard M
Original AssigneeRichard M Cutts Sr
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Anticlimb device
US 1636357 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

July 19, l927.-

R. M. CUTTS, JR

ANTICLIMB DEV-ICE Filed May 22, A192s abbot um* 'Panarea July i9, 1927.

UNIT-ED STATES PATENT OFFICE.

RICHARD I. CUTTB, JB., vF WASHINGTON, DISTRICT 0l' COLUHBIA, ASSIGNOR T0 RICHARD I. CUTTS, SR., 0F WASHINGTONLDISYTBICT 0F COLUMBIA.

mienne navos.

Application led lay 22,

This invention rel-ates to anti-climb devices for use on rifles, and has for its ob- A ject to provide a construction more eliclent in use and less costly to manufacture than those heretofore proposed. 1 With these and otherobjects in view the invention consists in the novel details of construction and combinations of parts which will be more fully disclosedhereinafter and particularly pointed-out in the claims.

Referring to the accompanying drawings forming a part of this specification in which like numerals designate like parts in all views:

Fig. 1 is a side elevational view of the invention as applied to a rifle barrel;

, Fig. 2 is a transverse sectional view taken on the lines 2 2 of Fig. 1 and looking in the direction of the arrows;

Fig. 3 is a transverse sectional view taken on the lines 3--3 of Fig. 1 and looking'in the `direction ofthe arrows; y

Fig. 4 is a vertical longitudinal sectional view of the parts shown in Fig. 1;

Fig. 5 isY a transverse sectional view taken on the line 5-5 of Fig. 1 and looking in the direction of the arrows;

Fig. 6 is a partial longitudinal sectional view taken on the line 6--6 of Fig. 1 and looking in the direction of the arrows; and

Fig. 7 is a vertical lon itudinal sectional view similar to Fig. 4 il ustrating a modi'- fed form of the invention.

This invention is adapted to preventk the climb, jump or whip, as well as reduce the recoil, of machine guns, automatic or semi-l automatic riies of various sizes, and firearms of all kinds. It is attached to the muzzle in any suitable manner and may be adapted to compensate for, or produce, a

lateral movement of the muzzle of the ire arm, as will be disclosed later.

. This invention constitutes an improvement over the invention disclosed in myco-pending` application filed July 20, 1925, Serial No. 44,954, entitled Climb arrester.

' This invention comprises a substantiallyV cylindrical member 1 threaded internally at one end to engage the end of themuzzle 2 of the rifiebarrel 3 provided with the usual bore 4. `When the device is thus secured to a rifle there is formed an expansion chamber 6 which may be cylindrical or otherwise vtending transverselgf` 1926. Serial I0. 110,988.

but of av diameter adjacent the muzzle 2 greater than the bore 4 of the rifle or weapon to which the device may be attached. At the approximate longitudinal center, the device is drawn, molded or otherwise formed to provide a compression chamber as'indicated at 10, and an opening 11 at the free end of the device.` The internal diameter of this constricted opening 11 will be, in all cases,

slightly larger than the caliber of the ammunition used in the weapon.

The wall o f the compression chamber 10 is provided with a plurality of apertures 15 whose centers are substantially disposed in a longitudinal plane' of the device, and each aperture is of such size that substantially l all thereof lies above the central horizontal plane of the climb arrester.

` It is tobe understood that the positions ofl be varied to obtain the said apertures ma results desired wit the variation in the firearms to which the climb arrester is to be applied all within the scope of this invention and in the manner to be later explained.

Each of the apertures 15 comprises a substantially rectangularly shaped'opening exof the device and as best illustrated in igures 1 and 4. Each aperture is provided with a rear surface 20,

A anda forward surface 21, both of which are angularly disposed to an element of the chamber 10,v all as will be clear from Fig. 4. However,'it may be readily seen by anyone skilled in the art that the general outline of these apertures is not essential to this device. v

From what has now been disclosed it will be apparent that this device is provided with an expansion chamber in connection with a compression chamber extending from -tered in said constricted orifice 11 thereby diminishing to a larg? extent the yarea 'of said orifice, but not, o ing the same, with the result that the pressure of the gases expanded in the chamber the muzzle of the rifle to the vconstricted v opening 11. Further it will be seen that Wever, totally clos- '6 will be increased. Also it will be seen muzzle 2 in the direction of said reaction.v

This reaction is made suicient to compensate for the vertical climb of said nozzle. It will of course be obvious that the longitudinal position as well as the nuinber of apertures will vary with the degree of compensation required by the weapon to which the device is applied. That is to say, a machine gun with an attachment of this nature will very likely Ie uire the apertures 15 to be in a dii'erent ongitudinal position relative to said device than the apertures in a device lmade for other lire-arms.

Also it will be obvious that this climb arrester may be rotatably adjusted relative to the muzzle of the rifle as may be required and may be secured in said adjusted position in any suitable manner not shown. The first purpose of this adjustment is to1 change the position of the common central vertical plane through the apertures 15 in order to compensate for any lateral translated movement as may be f eind necessary from the use of the weapon".` The. second purpose ,of this adjustment' is to obtain traversing fire, either to the right or left.

From actual tests, it has been found that a dcvicemade in accordance with this invention will increase the pressure of the gases thereinfnotwithstanding the plurality of apertures lf5`througl1 which some of the gasesv are free to escape. ,This degree of compression, may of course be variedv but said d egree is-always' dependent yon the cali- 'ber of, and pressure developed in, the weapon upon which the device is'to be used, in combination with the desired increase of pressure of said .gases in the device, and the total cross-sectional area'of the apertures. The size of each aperture 15 may also be varied accordin to the particular weapon with which the evice 1s to be used,

' but in all eases the sizeof each opening may be figured from tests, and standards created in order that the apertures may be of sufficient size so that the gases escaping therethrough will produce a reaction on the diametrically opposed interior Wall of the device to force the climb arrester in thedirection of said reaction. That is to say, the gases inpassing through the apertures 15 react against the opposite imperfora'te wall of the device with a component of force at right angles to the longitudinal axis of the device and with a second component of force parallel to said axis, Whether the apertures 15 be slanted rearwardly as shown in the figures or slanted in a correspondingly forward direction. If the apertures are vertically disposed then the gases passing therethrough will react against the opposite wall of the device with a force acting only at right angles to the longitudinal axisof the device. The result of these forces tends to move the muzzle of the gun in the direction of the resultant of said component forces.

It is to be observed that the device 1 also has formed in the wall of the expansion chamber 6 a plurality of apertures 30 very similar to the apertures 15, in that they are slits obliquely disposed to an element of the chamber. The seslot-s 30, likewise rearwardly inclined as particularly illustrated in Fig. 6, are adapted to receive a portion .of the gases emerging from the muzzle 2 of the rifle barrel 3 which, in passing therethrough, will be deflected in the direction illustrated b the arrows. The result of the passage fo the gases through the apertures 30 will cause a reaction in adirection of the resultant of the component forces -of the emerging gases. Stated in other words, there will be a tendency to move the gun not only in a forward direction, but also in a direction away from the apertures 30. However, it is not desired to have the gun move positively in this last named dlrection, because such a movement would cause a substantially horizontal movement ofthe gun which in turn would create a traversing lire, due to the said aperturesB() beingl dlsposed 1n a substantially horizontal plane of the device 1 disposed 90 from thev -from the muzzle 2 into the expansion chamber 6 will therefore pass-through the apertures 35 exactly in the same manner as they pass through the apertures 30 except -as to direction. VFrom Figure 5 it will be seen that the extremities of the apertures 30 and 35 lies in intersecting diameters 110 and 41 of the device 1 which is a very important' feature and necessary in order to prevent horizontal translation of the gun barrel during semi-automatic orautoma'tic ire while at the same time allowing'the gases to escape through said apertures.

The purpose of these side apertures is to counteract the recoil of the gun and it is to be observed from the drawings'that the cen-` ters of said a ertures are disposed in a substantially horizontal plane when the device 1 is in normal operative position upon the gun barrel 3, which is at 90 to the vertical plane passing through the centers ofthe apertures 15. The result of this construction is that the gases passing through the apertures 15 will overcome the climb of the gun while gases passing with equal force through the side apertures 30 and 35 will reduce the recoil of said gun. From Aactual-tests it has been found that these apertures 30 and 35 of equal size and opposite disposition utilize but a small percentage of the gases of combustion, thus reserving the greater percentage of gases for use in the compression chamber to prevent the climb or vertical movement of the muzzle of the gun by their emergence through the apertures 15.

ItV is to be understood, however, that the apertures 30 and 35 may be placed forward in the Walls of the compression 'chamber where better results may be obtained from the gases emerging therethrough due v'to the increased pressure of said gases. In this connection, however, the slots will be either omitted entirely or reduced in num# ber in order to accommodate ,the recoill slots and 35 and in direct proportions to the amount of climb to be overcome.-

In Figure 7 is 'shown amodifed'form of the invention wherein-the device 1 comprises a cylinder which lacks'the compression chamber 10. However, the .gases emergin from the muzzle 2 of the rifle 3 will enter t e ptrtion of the cylinder corresponding to the expansion chamber and a portion of theseY gases will pass outwardly through diametrically opposed slotted apertures 46 exactly similar tothe apertures 30 and 35. The muzzle gases will travel into the forward portion 47 of the cylinder, but before they 'can pass through the orifice 48 in the end of the cylinder, they will encounter the turnedover end portion V49 of the cylinder, forming the orifice 48, and be obstructed suddenly thereby, and tovsu'ch an extent that the pressure of said gases Will be increased andan- `other portion of the gases' will emerge through-the slotted apertures 50 in a manner similar to the escape of the gases through the apertures 15. The apertures 50. are exactly similar. to the apertures 15 except that they are not `provided in a tapered section of the device with the result Ithat the f forward innermost edge of said apertures 50 will not act upon the gases traveling through the device 'in the sameI positive manner that the corresponding edges of the apertures 15 'act upon the gases passing therethrough.v

The turned-over end portion 49 of the device if not equal to the effect produced b invention but is illustrated only to show an.- other means of building uppmaintaining,

and retaining .for a longer period of time than possible with the-construction shown in Fig. 4, a pressure of the gases for use through apertures as heretofore disclosed.

However, this modified construction, which vmay be used with an equal degree of success with low powered `guns, is not suitable for higher poweredkguns due to the fact that the increase of gas pressure is formed suddenly as )contradistinguished from the, gradual building up of the same pressure in the preferred form illustrated in the precedingfigures. The advantage accruing from a gradual building up 4of the pressure will be apparent but may be stated as allowing the Work to. be performed by said frases starting sooner, and extending overa laenger period of time. Y This is due to the fact that, with particular reference to Figure 4, the increase in the gas pressure starts when the bullet 26 reaches the compression chamber' 10' and gradually builds up until the maximum diameter' of the bullet is centered in the orifice 11. On lthe other hand, with the construe.

tion shown in Figure 7, the gas pressure is not increased until said gas has reached the end Wall 49 of the cylinder at which time it is practically instantaneously increased, due to the centering of the bullet in the orifice 48. It is to be understood, however, that in the use of the modified form with lower powered guns, the bullets of which are generally of a short longitudinal dimension, it is highly desirable to retain the gases withln the chamber 47 for a period of time sufiicient to allow them to perform the Work necessary, and therefore in this case the longitudinal dimensionI of the orificial surface would necessarily be increased. Stated in other words, it is obvious that for a low powered lot gun utilizing a short bullet, the increase in fire is desired. This is accomplished by the escapement .of the gases through the' apertures 15, which have been now rotated so that the plane of the central portions thereof lies to one side of the vertical plane of the device. While usual normal lateral translation of movement of the muzzle of the rifle is toward the right as viewed from the butt, rotatable adjustment` of this device is intended to be such as will be understodd from the foregoing with reference to the gases'to positively secure the result desired,

to the end that the device may be attached to fire-armsLcompletely eliicient, small in size an light in weight. It is apparent that unless the device is clearly efficient, light in weight, and smaller in size,its` value willbe negligible.

It is obvious that those skilled in the 'art may vary the details of construction as well as the arrangements of parts, without departing froml the spirit of the invention, and therefore it is not desired to be limited to the above disclosure except as may be required by the claims.

What is claimed is 1. A firearm provided with a muzzle and a chamber associated therewith adapted to receive the gases of explosion, Vthe walls .of said chamber provided with a group of dlametrically opposed apertures and another i group of apertures disposed to onev side of a planepassin through the axis of said chamber, where y on firing,I said gases will exert a forward pressure on said muzzle due to said first' named apertures and a downward pressure on .said muzzle due to said second named apertures.

2. A firearm provided with a muzzle and' a. chamber associated therewith adapted to receive'the gases of explosion, the walls ofY said chamber provided with a group of-diametrically opposed rearwardly directed apertures and another group of apertures disposed to one side of a plane passing through the axis of said chamber, whereby on firing, said gases will exert a forward pressure on said muzzle due to said first named apertures and a downward pressure on said muzzle due to said second named apertures.

3.7A firearm provided with a muzzle and a chamber associated therewith adapted toreceive the' gases of explosion, the walls of said chamber provided with a group of dia- 'metrically opposed transversely extending apertures and another group of apertures disposed to one side of a .plane passing throughthe axis of said chamber, whereby on firing, said gases will lexerta forward pressure on said muzzle due to said first named apertures and a downward pressurel said chamber provided with a group of diametrically opposed rearwardly and outwardly directed apertures and another group of apertures disposed to one side of a plane passing* through the axis of said chamber, whereby firing, said gases will exert a forward pressure o n saidv muzzle due to said first named apertures and a downward pressure on said muzzle due to said second named -by on firing, said gases will exert a forward pressure on said muzzle due to said first named apertures and a downward pressure on said muzzle d ue to said second named apertures. i

6. Inafirearm the combination of a muzzle and a chamber provided with one group of apertures disposed to one side of a plane passing through itsy axis, and with another group of apertures disposed on opposite sides of a 'plane passing through said. axis, the wall of said chamber opposite said first named apertures being imperforate, and all of said apertures adapted to cause a movement of said muzzlelupon iiring in a plurality of directions.

7. In a firearm the combination of a muzzle and an adjustable chamber provided with one group of apertures disposed to one side of a plane passing through its axis, and with another group of apertures disposed on opposite sides of a plane passing through said axis, the wall of said chamber opposite said first named apertures being'imperforate, and all of said apertures adapted to cause a move- 'ment of said muzzle upon firing in aN plurality of directions.

- 8. `In a firearm the combination of a muzzle and an adjustable chamber provided with Vone group of transversely extending apertures being imperforate, and all of said aper-v tures adapted to cause a movement of said muzzle upon'firing in a plurality of directions.

9. In a firearm the combinaion of a muzzle and a chamber provided with one group of apertures disposed obliquely to the axis of the chamber and to one side of a plane passing through its axis, and with anotherv group of vapertures disposed `obliquely to the axis of the chamber and on opposite y receive the sides of' a plane passing throughsaid axis,l

y of said apertures adapted to cause a movement of said muzzle upon firing in a plurality of directions determined by said oblique dispositions.

10. In a firearm the combination of a muzzle and a chamber provided With one group ofapertures disposed in a longitudinal plane to one side of a plane passingthrough vits axis, and with another group of apertures disposed on opposite sides of said longitudinal plane, the wall of said chamber opposite said first named apertures being imperforate, and all of said apertures adaptedto cause a movement of said muzzle upon firing in a plurality of directions. 4

11. In a firearm the combination of a muzzle and a chamber provided with one group of apertures disposed to one side ofl a plane passmg through its axis, and with another group of apertures disposed on opposite sides of'a plane passing through saidaxis, the Wall of said chamber opposite said first named apertures being imperforate, and all of said apertures adapted to cause a movement of said muzzle 'u on tiring in a plurality of predetermine directions.

12. In a firearm provided with a muzzle the combination of an expansion chamber to receive thegases of explosion as they emerge from said muzzle; a compression chamber in prolongation of said expansion. chamber to ases therefrom; and means associated wit said compression chamber to release a portion of said gases .under increasedpressure tending to produce movement of said muzzle in a, longitudinal direction.

. 13. The combination with a gun barrel,- 4of an adjustable chambermounted on and extending beyond the muzzle of the barrel to receive the ases of explosion as they emerge from said barrel, said chamber being provided with means to substantially simultaneously compress said gases in a longitudinal direction and to release said gasesl in a transverse direction, said, transverse movement being in a direction governed by the adjustedposition of said chamber.

14. In a firearm provided with a muzzle the combination of an adjustable expansion chamber to receive the (gases of explosion as they emerge from sai muzzle; means assoclated with said chamber to increase 'the pressure of 'the expanded gases; and meansV further associated with said chamber to release the expanded gases under pressure to tend Ato produce movement of Asaid muzzle in any redetermined direction due to the adjustability of said chamber.

15. In a firearm provided with a muzzle the combination of an expansion chamber to receive the gases of explosion as they emerge gases under from said muzzle; means associated with said chamber to increase the pressure of the' expanded gases; and means further associated with said chamber to release the expanded gases under pressure in a plurality of predetermined directions to oppositely counteract the movement of said muzzle in a plurality of directions. f

16. In a firearm provided with a muzzle the combination of an expansion chamber to receive the gases of explosion as they emerge from said muzzle; constricting means associated with said chamber to increase the pressure of the expanded gases; and means further associated with said chamber to release the expanded gases under pressure in a plurality `of predetermined directions to oppositely counteract the movement of said muzzle ina plurality of directions.

17. In a firearm provided with a muzzle the combination of an expansion chamber to receive the gases of explosion as they emerge from said muzzle; means comprising a tapered passage associated with said' chamber to increase the pressure of the expanded gases; and me ns further associated With said chamber to ahelease the expanded gases under pressure in a plurality ofpredetermined 'directions to oppositely counteract the movement of said muzzle in a plurality of directions. y

18. In a firearm provided with a muzzle the combination of an expansion chamber to receive the gases of explosion as they emerge from said muzzle; means associated with said chamber to increase the pressure of the expanded gases; and means comprising a plurality of apertures further associated with said chamber to release the expanded pressure in a plurality of pre-- determined directions to oppositely counteract the movement of said muzzle in a plurality of directions.

19. In a firearm provided with a muzzle the combination of an expansion chamber to receive the gases of explosion as they emerge from said muzzle; means associated with said chamber to increase the pressure of the expanded gases; and means comprising" a plurality of apertures further associated Lwith said chamber and arranged in a plurality of groups to release the expanded gases under pressure in predetermined drections to oppositely counteract the movement of said muzzle in a plurality of directions. v y

20. A firearm-provided with a muzzle and an adjustable expansion chamber 'to receive the gases of explosion as they emerge from said muzzle, said chamber being provided with means to increase the pressure of the expanded gases, and also means to release the expanded 'gases under pressure, said last named'means being disposed atan angle to the axis of said chamber to tend to produce sition of said chamber.

21.l In a {iream provided with a muzzle the combination of a chamber to receive the gases of explosion as they emerge from said muzzle, said chamber provided with means to release a portion of said gases in predetermined directions to counteract recoil,v and further provided with means to release under increased pressure another portion of said gases in a predetermined direction to counteract climb of said muzzle In testimony whereof 1 ax my si nature.

RICHARD M. CUTT., JR.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2446994 *Mar 1, 1944Aug 17, 1948George A BarkerExplosive-operated shears
US2457802 *Jun 6, 1944Jan 4, 1949August BauerSilencer and recoil reducer for firearms
US2916970 *Feb 10, 1956Dec 15, 1959Mutter John FAnti-recoil gun barrels
US2935000 *Apr 14, 1954May 3, 1960Palmer R Bonds JrCombination torque and recoil compensator and barrel bushing for guns
US3455203 *Mar 22, 1967Jul 15, 1969Arthur PillersdorfMulti-linear nozzle ballistic attenuator of recoil,blast and flash
US3492750 *Nov 15, 1967Feb 3, 1970Ashbrook Clifford LMuzzle choke
US3664052 *Apr 2, 1970May 23, 1972Mounier BruceImpact actuated underwater gun
US3714727 *Aug 25, 1970Feb 6, 1973Skb Arms CoA gun barrel
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Classifications
U.S. Classification89/14.3
International ClassificationF41A21/00, F41A21/36
Cooperative ClassificationF41A21/36
European ClassificationF41A21/36